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X Collection 
INDEX 



Page:_ 



Barcode Number 



LIBRftRY OF CONGRESS 

llillil iliii iilti il III ii Ji ill" '"" ""' "'*' "'" ■*'" •'" 




029 767 380 4 

LIBRftRY OF CONGRESS 



I 





029 7 67 381 6 



Box Number 



I? 134 



Total of 
Volumes 



-^^o 



^133 



^ 



Call Number 






yv^jfr 



(ifCo-u,jJ4) 






BRIDGES 

l)N DVVIJ) B. STEJNMAX 



CONsI LTINC KXCINKKR 



.S8 



\^^ 



REPRINTED FROM 

SCIENTIFIC 
AMERICAN 

NOVEMBER 1954 






PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER 

The Voice of the Engineer" 

• 

Published Four Times a Year at Mount Morris, Illinois 

The American Association of Engineers 

8 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago 3, 111. 



Volume 40 



June 30, 1955 



Number 2 



Dr. Sleinman, Liie Member of AJl.E., 
Heads Academy oi Sciences 

Dr. D. B. Steinman, internationally 
eminent bridge engineer and scientist, was 
elected President of the New York Acad- 
emy of Sciences at the Annual Dinner of 
the Academy on December 4th. He suc- 
ceeds Dr. George B. Pegram, distin- 
guished scientist and Dean of the Gradu- 
ate Faculties of Columbia University. 

Dr. Steinman is a Life Fellow of the 
Academy and was one of the founders of 
its Section on Mathematics and Engi- 
neering. He is a Past President of the 
National Society of Professional Engi- 
neers, National Council of State Boards 
of Engineering Examiners, U. S. Council 
of tlie International AsscK-iation of Bridge 
ami Structural Engineering, American 
Association of Engineers, Structural Di- 
vision of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, American Bridge, Tunnel and 



Turnpike Association, New York State 
Society of Professional Engineers, Metro- 
politan Section of the American Society 
of Civil Engineers, and other professional 
organizations. He has designed and built 
over 300 bridges on five continents, and 
six of his bridges have been honored in 
the Annual Artistic Bridge awards for 
the most beautiful bridges in America. 

Dr. Steinman is the author of a num- 
ber of well-known books on bridge engi- 
neering in addition to hundreds of scien- 
tific, mathematical, and technical papers 
and publications. He has twice received 
the Norman Medal, the highest award of 
the American Society of Civil Engineers. 
For his scientific and professional con- 
tributions and achievements he has re- 
ceived numerous honors and awards from 
engineering and scientific bodies in this 
country and abroad, and a number of 
decorations and honors from foreign 
countries. 



SS 



^ BULLETIN DE L'ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONALE DES PONTS ET CHARPENTES 

^ MITTEILUNGEN OER INTERN. VEREINIBUNC FOR BROCKENBAO & HOCHBAD 

BULLETIN OF THE INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR BRI06E ANB 

No. 14 STRUCTURAL ENOINEERINB No. 14 



30 Juillet 1955 



30. Julj 1955 



Julf30, 1955 



The Mackinac Bridge, Michigan (USA) 



Ce pont-route a une longueur de 
8100 m. II comporte deux approches 
admettant chacune 30 travees et une 
partie mediane a 3 travees. 

La partie mediane constitue un pont 
suspendu de 2580 m de longueur, la 
portee entre les deux pylones etant de 
1150 m. Le tablier a 4 pistes a une 
largeur de 14,6 m. Les pylones de 
168 m de hauteur sont en acier. Les 
piles ont du etre enfoncees parfois jus- 
qu'a 60 m au-dessous du niveau de 
I'eau. Les travaux ont commence en 
juillet 1954 et doivent etre termines en 
novembre 1957. Le poids de I'ensemble 
de I'ouvrage doit etre de 66 500 tonnes 
d'acier (cables, tablier, pylones) ; le 
volume de beton atteindra 335 000 m* 
(fondations, blocs d'ancrage, piles et 
appuis). Les frais de construction sont 
estimes a 99 800 000 dollars. 

Les investigations geotechniques ont 
revele un sol de fondation rocheux, ad- 
mettant une capacite de charge de 
65 kg/cm^, ce qui correspond a une 
securite de quatre fois. Pour tenir 
compte du charriage des glagons, il a 
ete necessaire de proteger les piles avec 
des plaques d'acier. Les deux cables 
porteurs travaillent a une traction de 
30 000 tonnes. On a admis pour la 
pression du vent 250 kg/m*. Le treillis 
derenforcement a unehauteurde 11,5m. 

D'apres ses calculs aerodynamiques 
et les essais en soufflerie,rauteur estime 
avoir realise sur cet ouvrage la plus 
grande securite possible. 



Diese StraBenbriicke ist 8100 m lang 
und besteht aus den beiden Zufahrts- 
bauwerken mil zusammen 30 Feldern 
und dem 3-feldrigen Mittelstiick. 

Dieser Mittelteil ist eine Hiinge- 
briicke von 2580 m Lange, wobei die 
Spannweite zwischen den beiden Tiir- 
men 1150 m betragt. Die 4-spurige 
Fahrbahn ist 14,6 m breit. Die 168 m 
hohen Tiirme sind aus Stahl. Die Pfei- 
ler muBten teilweise bis auf 60 m Tiefe 
unter dem Wasserspiegel fundiert wer- 
den. Die Arbeiten wurden im Juli 1954 
begonnen und sollen bis zum November 
1957 beendet sein. Das ganze Bauwerk 
soil 66 500 t Stahl (Kabel, Fahrbahn- 
konstruktion, Tiirme) und 335 000 m' 
Beton (Fundamente, Verankerungs- 
blocke, Pfeiler und Widerlager) ent- 
halten. Die Baukosten wurden auf 
99 800 000 Dollars geschatzt. 

Die geotechnischen Untersuchungen 
ergaben fiir den felsigen Untergrund 
eine Tragfahigkeit von 65 kg/cm^ was 
einer 4-fachen Sicherheit entspricht. 
Mit Riicksicht auf den Eisgang sollen 
die Pfeiler mit Stahlplatten gestiitzt 
werden. Die beiden Tragkabel-werden 
auf 30 000 t Zug beansprucht. Als 
Winddruck wurden 250 kg/m* ange- 
nommen. Das Versteifungsfachwerk ist 
11,5 m hoch. 

Der Verfasser glaubt. auf Grund 
seiner aeroydnamischen Berechnungen 
und Versuche im Windkanal eine 
groBtmogliche Sicherheit fiir dieses 
Bauwerk erreicht zu haben. 



This road bridge is five miles long 
and consists of the two approach sec- 
tions, of altogether 30 spans, and the 
3-span centre section. 

This centre section is a suspension 
brid-ge 8,614 ft. long, with a span of 
3,800 ft. between the two towers. The 
4-lane carriageway is 48 ft. wide. The 
550 ft. high towers are of steel. The 
piers had in some places to be founded 
at a depth of 200 ft. below the water 
level. Work was begun in July 1954 and 
should be completed by November 
1957. The complete structure will re- 
quire 66,500 tons of steel (cables, deck 
structure and towers) and 440,000 cu. 
yds. of concrete (foundations, anchor 
blocks, piers and abutments). The 
estimated total coat is 99.8 million 
dollars. 

The geotechnical investigations gave 
a bearing capacity for the foundation 
rock of 60 tons per sq. ft., with a factor 
of safety of 4. In consideration of ice 
conditions, the piers will be protected 
by steel plates. The two suspension 
cables have a combined loading of 
30,000 tons. The wind pressure was 
taken as 50 Ib/sq. ft. The stiffening 
trusses are 38 ft. deep. 

The author considers, on the basis 
of his aerodynamic calculations and 
wind tunnel experiments that the great- 
est possible safety has been achieved 
in this structure. 



D. B. STEINMAN, Consulting Engineer, New York, N. Y. 
Suspension Bridges. The Aerodynamic Problem and Its 

Solution 
Les problemes aerodynamiques du pont suspendu et leurs 

solutions 
Die aerodynamischen Probleme und ihre Losungen bei 
Hangebriicken 






New Underwater Concreting Records 
Set at Mackinac Bridge 



Mortar hitrusion technique eniployed in pJacin^i over 
22,000 cubic yards of pier concrete in 5-day period. 



€ 



Reprinted from the September, 1955, issue of 
ROADS AND STREETS 



/ 



^5 



EXTRAIT DU GiNIE CIVIL 
du I 5 Juln I 955 



LE YIADUC 

SUR LE DETROIT DE MACKINAC 

entre le lac Michigan et le lac Huron 

(^TATS-UNIS) 

par 
D. B. STEINMAN. 

Ingenieur-conseil , New-Yori'. 






O A Die 



High Aerodynamic Stability 
For Mackinac Bridge 

Wind tunnel tests on a model of 
the Mackinac suspension bridge in 
the University of Washington labora- 
tories have upheld the views of the 
designer, D. B. Steinman, consulting 
engineer of New York, that the struc- 
ture will have unusually high aero- 
dynamic stability. The tests indicate 
that the bridge will have complete 
stability against all modes of oscila- 
tion (vertical, torsional and coupled) 
at all wind velocities and all angles 
of attack. 

The outstanding feature of the de- 
sign is the provision of 10 ft wide, 
open spaces between the stiffening 
trusses and outer edges of the road- 
way; the bridge trusses are spaced 68 
ft apart and the roadway is onlv 48 
ft wide. The design also provides the 
equivalent of an opening along the 
centerline of the bridge, since the two 
outer lanes are solid, while the two 
inner lanes and the center mall have 
an open grid construction. Maximum 
torsional stability has been achieved by 
providing two systems of lateral brac- 
ing, located in the planes of the top 
and bottom chords of the truss, a 
feature recently added to the Golden 
Gate Bridge in San Francisco. 

The model was also tested with all 
openings in the deck closed as if by 
ice, and even under these conditions 
its aerodynamic stability was main- 
tained. 

Prof. F. B. Farquharson, director 
of the laboratory at the University of 
Washington, conducted the tests. 






ENGINEERING NEWS-RECORD 

Vol. 155, No. n September 15, 1955 



76 



THE AUSTRALASIAN ENGINEER 



June 7, 1955. 




NORTH CABLE ANCHORAGE. 

Concreting operations on North Cable Anchorage (Pier 22). Constructed 
rectangular coffer dam of interlocking steel sheet-piling. 



and ihe lines of waiting cars have ex- 
tended along the highway as far back 
as 20 miles from the ferry. Parking 
6eldi5 are provided for the waiting cars, 
and the occupants find overnight 
accommodation to resume their place in 
line in the morning. 

Photographs, ijtereo views, and 
movies of these traffic conditions at 
the Mackinac ferries were used to 
convince bankers and investors before 
the bridge bonds were sold. 

The proposed toll rates on the bridge 
will average 10 per cent, higher than 
the present rates on the' ferries; the 
time-saving will be the governing ad- 
vantage to the motorists. At an average 
toll rate of $3.08 per vehicle ($2.10 
for a passenger auto., more for trucks), 
the estimated traffic of 2,000,000 cars 
and trucks in 1958 will yield a revenue 
of over $6,000,000 in the first year of 
operation, with progressive increases 
thereafter. According to the traffic ex- 
perts, the bridge will pay for itself in 
18 years (retiring aJl bonds), and can 
then be made toll-free. 

From Oream to Reality. 

Since 1920 there had been several 
bridge and tunnel projects. In 1950 
the present Mackinac Bfjdge Authority 
was created by the Michigan State 
Legislature. The Authority promptly 
appointed a Board of Consulting En- 
gineers: O, H. Ammann, G. B. Wood- 
ruff, and the writer. In 1951 the 
;hree-man Board of Consultants re- 



ported that construction of the bridge 
is feasible. The traffic-engineering firm 
of Coverdale and Colpitis was retained 
to make the survey of traffic and pros- 
pective revenue. 

In .January, 195 3, the Authority 
selected the writer to design and super- 
vise the construction of the bridge, 
and the writer engaged Glenn B. 
Woodruff as his Associate Consultant. 
WitWn two mootlu, in March, 195 3, 
preliminary contract plans and esti- 
mates of quantities were rejdy and the 
substructure and superstructure con- 
tracts were negotiated and awarded for 
prompt commencement of construction 
as soon au the bonds could be sold. 
All plans were rushed to get construc- 
tion started in the spring of 1953. 

Bonds Sold. 

Two attempts to sell the bonds were 
made in April and June, 1953, but the 
bond market was unfavourable. A new 
syndicate of investment bankers was 
formed and, in December, 1953, this 
group of bankers purchased the $99.8 
million of bonds to finance the project, 
at interest rates of four per cent, for 
$79.8 million of first-lien bonds and 
Vi per cent, for $20 million of second- 
lien bonds. 

On lanuarv 18, 1954, the $79.8 mil- 
lion of first-lien bonds were ofered by 
the banking r.yndicatc and sold to the 
bond houses and investin" public in 
one day. The second-lien bonds were 
not offered to the public but were held 



by the underwriters for their own 
accounts. 

Througrh the spring of 1954 the con- 
tractors proceeded to order materials 
and. to mobilize equipment. During the 
next few months, $5 million of floating 
construction equipment was assembled 
and in place along the Une of the 
bridge for the '.ubstructure contract, 
»aid to be the largest and finest floating 
equipment ever assembled for a con- 
struction contract. 

On July 10, actual excavation was 
commenced for the subaqueous founda- 
tions. Over 700 men were engaged 
on the work at the site, working 20 tc 
24 hours a day. It was a race against 
time and a battle against the elementG. 
The winter ice conditions at the Straits 
limit the normal working season to 
eight months. Word went down the 
line, from the president of the Merritt- 
Chapman fy Scott Corporation to every 
man in the' organisation, to spare no 
effort or expense to meet the engineer's 
fchedule and to get all the suspension 
bridge piers and anchorages down to 
rock before the freezing of the Straits. 
To make up for time lost by impossible 
weather conditions, the men continued 
working in the rough water of the 
Straits through the winter cold, snow, 
and storms until freezing of the Straits 
finally forced the work to stop on 
January 14. 1955; but the two main- 
stMn piers were safely down into the 
bed rock under the Straits, and the 
side-span piers and anchorages were 
already completed as scheduled. 

An Ultra-Safe Bridde. 

Because of the unusual brecciated 
formation, people said that the rock 
underlying the Straits could not sup- 
port the weight of the bridge. To re- 
solve any doubts, outstanding geologists 
and soil-mechanics authorities were re- 
tained. Exhaustive geological studies, 
laboratory compression tests, and "in- 
place" load tests on the rock undel 
water at the site established, without a 
doubt, that the rock under the Straffs 
can safely support more than 60 tons 
per square foot. This is four or more 
times as great as [he greatest possible 
load that will fee imposed on the rock 
by the structure, including the com- 
bination of dead load, live load, wind 
load and ice pressure. The foundations 
were proportioned to keep the maxi- 
mum possible resultant pressure below 
1 5 tons per square foot on the under- 
lying rock. 

Because the public had been alarmed 
by the unscientific claims that no struc- 
ture could withstand the ice pressure 
at the Straits, we added a further 
generous _ margin of ultra-safety. Ac- 
:ording to the most recent engineering 
literature on the subject, the maximum 
ice pressure ever obtained in the field 
is 21,000 pounds per lineal foot of 
pier width, and the greatest ice pres- 
sure producible in the laboratory under 



5 6 



WILLIAM PROCTER PRIZE 
FOR SCIENTIFIC ACHIEVEMENT 



4> 



Wisconsin 



Poetry Magazine 



Founded 1954 



Vol. 3 September -October, 1957 No. I 



PRIZE AWARDS FOR VOLUME II 



Prize Awards for No. 6 - VOL. 2 

The awards for Vol. II, No. 6, judged by vote of member- 
ship were given to Margaret Buxton, Mark Van Doren, David 
B. Steinman, Alfred Leland Mooney, Frederika Blankner, 
Helen Frith Stickney, Alice Phelps Rider, Virginia Chapin 
and Barbara Lee Newman. 



Six judges were chosen to decide the awards for VOL. II as a 
whole. The winners are as follows : The Oil Painting by Leander 
Leitner was given to Beulah Jackson Charmley. Two paintings 
by Rockwell H. Schaefer went to Dr. David B. Steinman. There 
was a tie for the twenty-five dollar award. This was divided 
between Jean Starr Untermeyer and Margaret Widdemer. The 
ten dollar award went to Edward Davison. The Prof. Knosker 
award of ten dollars was given to Gordon Gilsdorf, the ten dollar 
Princess Matchabelli Award to Mary Boyd Wagner and the ten 
dollar Emma Mills Award to Ted Lovington. Two five dollar 
awards went to Laura Benet and to Ailce Phelps Rider. The 
awards went to Laura Benet and to Alice Phelps Rider. The 
ten dollar Dorothy Quick Award went to James Reynolds. 






IL MATTING 



L C N E D r 4 NOVEMBRE 1957 



IL PONTE 
SULLO STRETTO 

Svcrnio ostUi ai versi. Sia- 
mo diffid&^ti degli ingegneri 
che producono versi. Siamo 
perples»i dinanzi al progetto 
di un ponte sospeso sullo 
Stretto di Messina. 

Eppure, pubblichiamo i se- 
guenti versi, composti da un 
ingegnere, e dedioati preci- 
smnente alia visione del pon- 
te suUo Stretto: 

Alto sopra lo stretto, 
Ogni timor sparito, 

Kello splendor torreggia 
II grande ponte ardito; 

K questa luce appare 
Qual fulgida speranza 

Ai secoll futuri 

D'umana fratellanza. 

Perch^ questa eccezione f 

Perchd qv^sti versi so^io 
atati composti precisamente 
dall'ingegnere che ha proget- 
tato il ponte, — D. B. Stein- 
rrutn — e ci pervengono dal 
suo studio, sito in 117 Liber- 
ty Street New York 6, N. Y., 
USA. 

E adesso i compositori di 
versi nostrani sono avvertiti; 
se vogliono che Veccezione si 
ripeta, devono prendere la 
kifurea in ingegneria, proget- 
tare un altro ponte su qiial- 
che Stretto, e spedirci il loro 
prodotto poetico da New 
York. 



r 



AMERICAN WEAVE 

A Magazine of Poetry for Enjoyment 
Eilitecl by Loving Williams and Alice Crane Williams 






n 




I INTENDED A SONNET 
{With a bow to Austin Dobson) 

I INTENDED a sonnet 

and it turned to a triolet: 

when I started upon it 

I intended a sonnet, 

but I saw your new bonnet 

with ribbons of violet; 

I intjended a sonnet 

and it turned to a triolet. 

D. B. Steinman 



E T T I LETTERARI ^~^ C^ >t^ (j 

L U C A N I A D' O G G I "^^ 



Novembre ■ Dicembre 1957 



Per l America 



THE ICE CREAM VENDOR OF SORRENTO 

I was strolling to buy a memento 

On the sun-dazzling beach of Sorrento, 

By the blue Neapolitan sea. 
When the sweet strains of Santa Lucia 
Drew my eyes to a gelateria 

On the rocks near the ferryboat quay. 



IL GELATAIO DI SORRENTO 

Bighellonavo per comprare un ricordo 
Lungo Vabbacinante spiaggia ili Sorrento, 

SulVazzurro mare di ISapoli, 
Quando le note soavi di Santa Lucia 
Richiamarono il mio sgunrdo a una gelateria 

Sugli scogli presso al niolo del vaporetto. 



At the flower-draped booth the young vendor. 
In accents appealing and tender, 

Entrated the folks passing by: 
« Get some ice cream, signore, signori, » 
Until twilight on red wings of glory 

Overspread the cerulean sky. 



Dal chiosco infinrato il gelataio giovinetto. 
Con accenti teneri e nllettanti, 

Invitava i pas.santi : 
« Gelati ! Signore, Signori, gelati! » 
Finche il cropuscolo su rosse ali di gloria 

Si diffuse nel cielo turchino. 



But the strollers went by without heeding 
The desperate note of his pleading 

And the lure of the gramophone's tune; 
When the gold of the sunset departed. 
The youth stood alone, broken-hearted. 

In the sadly-sweet light of the moon. 



Ma la gente passava senza curarsi 
Delia nota disperata del suo invito 

E della melodin allettante del grammofono. 
Quando Voro del tramonto scomparve 
II giovune rimase solo, col cuore spezzato, 

Nella soave trixtezza della luce lunare. 

1). B. Steinman 



117 Liberty St. 

New York 6. N.Y. 







n 1 n s u 1 a 



1 



O 

E 
T 

S 



A MATHEMATICIAN'S ADVICE TO A YOUNG LADY 



Take a number, just for fun, 
Draw a line and marry one. 
Now your adding has begun, 
Multiply and carry one. 

II 

Avoid long division, repair it: 

Just make up the difference and square it. 

Ill 

Extract the root of every trouble; 
Divide your joys and they will double. 

IV 

A pair is greater than its parts; 
One love is better than seven. 
A line that joins two loving hearts 
Is the shortest distance to heaven. 

— D.B. Steinman 



Poetry Society 

of Michigan 
SUMMER 1957 



DECEMBER 
1957 



S6 




CHRISTMAS SYMPHONY 

On Christmas eve I crossed a bridge 

That links two lands in amity. 
No barrier stands across the span; 

Instead my heart rejoiced to see 
A portal arch of balsam boughs 

To spell once more, in soft blue light, 
The ageless words of peace and hope 

That shepherds heard one starry night. 

Afar I heard the church bells ring 

And saw the twinkling light aglow; 
A peaceful gladness filled the air 

As on that night of long ago ; 
And now, to join the symphony, 

The span and towers, soaring high, 
Are like a star-strung frame of song, 

A gleaming harp against the sky. 

Both dreams of man invoke the stars: 

The bridge of faith, the prayerful spire; 
Both give their anthems to the world, 

To ring out with the heavenly choir ; 
And as their music thrills my soul, 

I hear the angel-song again, 
The blessed tidings of great joy: 

"Peace on earth, good will to men." 

David B. Steinman, New York Alpha '06 



BENT OF TAU BETA PI 



v% 



• 



Reprinted from Journal of the Franklin Instititk, \C^ \ *VG 

Vol. 264. No. f), IXconilxr, 1957 CI 

Printed in U. S. .^ - O ^ 

MEDAL DAY PROCEEDINGS AT THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE 

October 16, 1957 

PRESENTATION OF THE LOUIS £. LEVT MEDAL 
(Founded in 1923) 

This Medal is awarded to the author of a paper of especial 
merit, published in the Journal of The Franklin Institute, 
preference being given to one describing the author's experi- 
mental and theoretical researches in a subject of fundamental 
importance. 

To David Barnard Steinman, Consulting Engineer, New York, 
New York. 

Dr. Rolph : "The Chair recognizes Dr. Joseph S. Hepburn." 
Dr. Hepburn: "Mr. Tresident, I present David Barnard Steinman 
for an award. 




David Barnard Steinman 

"In his excellent paper on the design of the Mackinac Bridge for 
aerodynamic stability. Dr. Steinman lias made a concise and compre- 
hensive presentation of the engineering principles involved in his 
design of this suspension bridge. 

"The outstanding original feature contributing to aerodynamic 
stability is the provision of wide open spaces between the stiffening 
trusses and the outer edges of the roadway. An additional factor 
for such stability is longitudinal open spaces in the bridge floor between 
the roadways. 

"The contribution of these features to such stability was confirmed 
by wind tunnel tests on scale models. Previous suspension bridges 
have had critical wind velocities ranging from 30 to 80 miles per hour. 
The Mackinac Bridge as designed has no critical wind velocity. 

"I present David Barnard Steinman, of New York, as a candidate 
for the Louis ¥.. Levy Medal, in recognition of his outstanding paper, 
■'The Design of the Mackinac Bridge for Aerodynamic Stability," 
apixaring in the December, 1956 issue of the Journal of The Frank- 
lin Institute." " 

Dr. Rolph: 'Dr. Steinman, by the same authority, I present 
t(j \c)u this Louis E. Levy Medal and the Certificate and Report which 
accompany it." 



From Vision To Achievement 

By DAVID BARNARD STEI]>fMAN, Nat Hon, 
LL.D., L.H.D., Litt.D., Eng.D., Sc.D. Consulting Engineer 



EVERY MAN'S PHILOSOPHY of life is the 
product of his experiences. This is 
especially true of the professional man. 
His faith, his dedication, and his de- 
votion to his profession are the prod- 
ucts of the experiences that have 
shaped his life. 

To me, engineering has been a suc- 
cession of inspiring influences, of im- 
pelling ambitions, of obstacles over- 
come, and of dreams come true. The 
realization — one after another — of 
dreams that seemed hopeless leaves me 
reverent and humble. 

I am proud to belong to a truly great 
profession — the profession of plan- 
ners and builders. 

The engineer is a builder. He builds 
his dreams and the dreams of his 
feUowmen into enduring realities. He 
harnesses God's magic for building 
man's dreams. He overcomes obstacles, 
breaks down barriers, and builds the 
bridge for the onward march of Civili- 
zation. 

Our one lesson from past experience 
is never to underestimate the future of 
engineering progress. Each new dis- 
covery opens tremendous vistas of fur- 
ther invention and application. The 
quickening tempo is logarithmic. Each 
new generation, building on the past, 
sees more progress in science and en- 
gineering than was recorded in all the 
preceding centuries. 

Before the dawn of history, the 
greatest engineering achievement was 
the invention and application of the 
wheel. This was man's first great im- 
provement upon nature. The pre- 
historic genius who hit upon this ap- 
parently simple invention could not 
have visualized the vast future signifi- 
cance, the amazing vistas of mechanical 
progress thereby made possible. Hardly 
any subsequent engineering advance 
would have been possible without the 
wheel in its manifold developments, 
symbolized by all the indispensable 
wheels of industry, transportation, and 
power. One invention led to millions 
of others. If all the wheels used, 
consciously or unconsciously, in our 
daily lives were suddenly annihilated, 
our civilization would collapse. 

Despite occasional myopic prophets 
who discounted, further progress, en- 
gineering achievement has advanced 
at an ever accelerating tempo. 

In 1837, a distinguished British scien- 
tist, with the odd name of Dionysius 
Lardner, published a scientific paper 
in which he proved, with irrefutable 
mathematical equations nobody could 
question, that it was impossible to 



Editor's Note — Because of the many in- 
spired requests at the Convention for 
Brother Steinman's after dinner comments 
they are reproduced here In full. 



build a steamship capable of a non- 
stop voyage from England to America. 
A few months later, on April 24, 1838. 
the steamer Sirixis arrived in New 
York, the first to cross the Atlantic 
entirely under steam. The ship brought 
to America copies of Lardner's paper 
"proving" that such voyage was im- 
possible! 

In 1843, Henry L. Ellsworth, U. S. 
Commissioner of Patents, wrote in his 
Annual Report to Congress: 

"The advancement of the arts, from 

year to year, taxes our credulity and 

seems to presage the arrival of that 

period when human improvement 

m.ust end." 
If the Commissioner had been a 
mathematician, he would have known 
the elementary fact that an expanding 
series can never be convergent; it can 
never approach a limit, but must con- 
tinue to expand to infinity. 

In 1902, Simon Newcomb, the dis- 
tinguished American mathematician, 
published a paper in which he proved 
mathematically that mechanical flight, 
of a machine heavier than air and 
capable of carrying a man, was physi- 
cally impossible. The following year, 
on December 17, 1903, two bicycle 
mechanics, the Wright brothers, made 
their epoch-making flight at Kitty 
Hawk in North Carolina — the first 
flight by man in a machine heavier 
than air. That is the way progress is 
made — by defying the impossible! 

With their crude box-kite, made of 
wire, wood and fabric, and propeller- 
driven by a small motorcycle engine, 
Orville and Wilbur Wright ushered in 
the age of flight, leading to the present 
gigantic and powerful multi-engined 
planes and ultrasonic jet planes, and an 
unlimited future of rockets, artificial 
satellites, and space-travel. 

This picture of human progress is 
sketched in some lines I have written, 
under the caption "Ad Astra." 

When man first flung a log astride a 

stream. 
He leapt millenniums beyond his 

birth; 
Now strands of steel translate his 

lofty dream 
To link the farthest corners of the 

earth; 
He tames the sea, and ventures forth 

to sail 
The very skies in globe-encircling 

flight; 
His jets and rockets blaze a fiery trail 
And ring the universe with lanes of 

light. 
Unsated still, though master now of 

space, 
Man strives (as strive he must)- to 

conquer time; 




Brother Steinman 

Some inner force impels him on, to 

trace 
Beyond the stars a destiny sublime. 
With light of faith to set his spirit 

free 
Man builds a bridge to span 

eternity. 

In 1912, when I was a young Pro- 
fessor of Civil Engineering at the Uni- 
versity of Idaho and had just published 
a book on "Suspension Bridges and 
Cantilevers," I was in correspondence 
with Gustav Lindenthal, who was then 
the dean of American bridge engineers. 
I confided to him my ambition to 
specialize in long-span bridges; he re- 
plied in a discouraging vein, declaring 
that no more long-span bridges would 
be built; the high price of steel, he 
said, had made them prohibitive. (The 
price of steel, erected, had gone up 
from 21/i cents to 3 cents a pound)) 
Two years later, in 1914, Lindenthal 
called me to New York to be his 
Special Assistant on the design and 
construction of two new record-break- 
ing bridges, the Hell Gate Bridge at 
New York (the world's largest and 
heaviest arch span) and the Sciotoville 
Bridge over the Ohio River (the 
world's greatest and longest continuous 
truss bridge) . Never underestimate the 
future of engineering! 

It took forty years (from 1889 to 
1929) to increase the world's record 
span length by only 150 feet, from the 
Forth Bridge in Scotland with 1,700- 
foot span to the Detroit-Ambassador 
Bridge of 1,850-foot span. In the next 
eight years, in two bold jumps, the 
world's record span-length was more 
than doubled, with the George Wash- 
ington Bridge (1931) of 3.500-foot span 
and the Golden Gate Bridge (1937) of 
4,200-foot span. 

In the ten years from 1930 to 1940 
there was more progress in bridge en- 
gineering than in all the centuries 
preceding. This included new bridge 
types, new record-breaking span- 
lengths, new materials, improved 
methods of analysis, and new erection 
methods. We are now working on 
bridge projects with unprecedented 
span-lengths of 5,000 to 6.300 feet, and 
bridge engineers now agree that span- 
lengths of 10,000 feet are well within 
the range of practical feasibility. 

On November 7, 1940, the world was 
shocked and the engineering profession 
was startled by the aerodynamic de- 
struction of the Tacoma Narrows 
Bridge, of 2,800-foot span, in a mild 



Triangle Review 



November 1957 






POETRY LONDON-NEW YORK 



Vol. 1, No. 3 Winter, 1957 



HART CRANE AND THE BRIDGE 

He felt the spell of it — the span that arched 
Above the harbor-traffic and its sounds. 
For his growing fever to create 
A spelled out order from the city's maze. 
He found the vision and the symbol here, 
The bridge's arc that a man had made 
To tilt the sky above the city's tides. 

Spirits and echoes still lingered there — 

Within the house, that very room, writhin whose walls 

Another man in torment had lived 

And made his bid for immortality. 

From this same attic on the Brooklyn shore, 

Through years of pain and loneliness, 

The stricken builder of the Bridge had watched 

His dream take shape in shining stone and steel. 

With a quickened pulse his flight was launched. 

Of cities and the open road he sang; 

Of iron rails, workers in the fields, 

Of boyhood memories, of lake and star 

Of rough South Street and the sailor's chants, 

Of Istanbul, sunken continents, and China. 

In a mighty pulsing like the march 

Of pioneers across the western plains, 

A nation's march from ocean to ocean. 

He flung the Bridge and heard its singing strings, 

A chain of strength to bind a continent 

And leap through space to reach his goal 

— Fulfillment of man's hunger. 

He saw the throb of machines 
Emerge from the earth's dark into light. 
Transformed like the Bridge in its skyward curve, 
A giant hand to set free man's longing 
— And lift him to the stars. 

His journeys now were done; 
Broken, spent, the poet sang no more. 
But still driven by a restless fire. 
Southward he sailed, and found the peace he sought 
In one last leap into the sea he loved. 

D. B. STEINMAN 



^- vc^\«vo 



.^e 




EVOLUTION 
By D. B. Steinman 

In ancient reign of fang and claw, 

When cruel struggle was the law, 

The feral and the ruthless thrived, 

The killer and the brute survived. 

These bred the race and multiplied 

While those with gentler instincts died. 

For that was evolution's plan 

In primal phase — "Descent of Man." 

A new dawn: Man was more than clod. 

And men appeared who walked with God. 

The prophet, poet, artist, sage. 

Lit beacon lights beyond their age. 

No longer brute, now heart and soul 

Are pointed upward toward a goal. 

For this is evolution's plan 

In crowning phase — "Ascent of Man." 

— David B. Steinman 



OCTOBER, 1957 



X. TG HO 



1 V. 




2^!^s^J 



Juni 1957 




H, 



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cinee^iHG 




f/ORIZONS are not boundaries. 
* * The future of engineering is un- 
bounded. There is no hmit to fu- 
ture progress and achievement. 

The horizon is merely the line of 
tangency circumscribing that which 
is immediately visible. There are 
always vast areas beyond the hori- 
zon. The opportunities for future 
discoveries and inventions are un- 
limited. 

The one assured fact is that hori- 
zons are ever expanding. As we 
scale new heights, new and greater 
horizons come into view. 

When we stand on the seashore, 
our horizon is a circle of three miles 
radius. When we ascend to the top 
of the Empire State Building, our 
horizon is enlarged to a radius of 
41 miles. The area of our field of 
view is increased 200-fold. 

Our one lesson from past experi- 
ence is never to underestimate the 
future of engineering progress. Each 



An address at the University of Flor- 
ida, March 11, 1957, following the ded- 
ication of the David B. Steinman 
Faculty Lounge 



by D. B. Steinman 

(National Honor Member) 



new discovery opens tremendous vis- 
tas of further invention and appli- 
cation. The quickening tempo is lo- 
garithmic. Each new generation, 
building on the past, sees more prog- 
ress in science and engineering than 
was recorded in all the preceding 
centuries. 

Before the dawn of history, the 
greatest engineering achievement 
was the invention and application of 
the wheel. This was man's first great 
improvement upon nature. The pre- 
historic genius who hit upon this 
apparently simple invention could 
not have visualized its future sig- 
nificance, the amazing vistas of me- 
chanical progress thereby made pos- 
.sible. Hardly any subsequent engi- 
neering advance would have been 
possible without the wheel in its 
manifold developments, symbolized 
by all the indispensable wheels of in- 
dustry, transportation, and power. 
One invention led to millions of oth- 
ers. If all the wheels used, con- 
sciously or unconsciously, in our 
daily lives were suddenly destroyed, 
our civilization would collapse. 

THE SPRING-FALL 1957 TRANSIT 



^Ite Khanate V^eam of ^\appcL j'^^hi 



oS 



David B. Ste'inmon 
(W-84) 



imW. or W £ACB[D fUM[ 

Dedicated +o The Kappo PVii Club 



Mary Louise Dutcher 
Opsilon 



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Kee - pers of +he sd-cred flame, Her -aids of fhe neaven-|/ host, 
In your song We hear His voice. In yoar light His love we 5ee^ 



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Hold high His lamp and Sing His name. Else darkness spreads and man IS lost. 
A dawn to make He world re-joice, A vi -sion of Di -vin - i " ty. 




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KEHPERS OF THE SACRED FLAME 
Rac Dcnnison (Epsilon) 

'I'o \paii ihc i^cif) from iihiii I" iihin 
Coiislnicl ,1 hy/dj(e iml nuule by hands. 
So/ uooil or sloiic or iron haiuh — 
(9/ H/iDi.in K/nclness hiiihl the spcin. 

— David B. Stcinman 

These arc words written by one ot the 
worlds ^createst bridge desi^qners and engineers. 
David B. Steinman. ami express the great need 
for building BRiDcl's of lovf. Dr. Steinman is 
the designer ot' the Mackinac Bridge in Michi- 
gan wlnicli was reccntl)' opened, as well as man}' 
other beautiful and useful bridges around the 
world. He is not only aware of the importance 



of linking land to land but also of linking man 
to man through love. 

Dr. Steinman was a very generous contribu- 
tor of materials for the 19^7-°iS Program and 
Devotional Book and wrote and dedicated a 
poem entitled "Keepers of the Sacred Flame" 
to The Kappa Phi Club. This poem was pre- 
sented at the (a)uncil of Chapters and delegates 
were asked to write music to accompany this 
lovely poem. Mary Louise Dutc her (Upsilon).. 
National Program Director, closed her chal- 
lenging Council experience by composing ap- 
propriate music. 1 he words and music become 
more meaningful each time they are read or 
simg and will live in the hearts of Kappa Phis. 
as thc\' remember BRifx.is or i.ov i-. 



DtTMllIxT 1957 



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THE STEINMAN POETRY LECTIJRES 

AND 

THE UNIVERSITY LECTURES 

19584959 



X. TG 140 
. S 8 



* 



Tuesday, October 14 

* Monday, October 20 



Tuesday, October 28 



Tuesday, November 18 



* Wednesday, December 3 

* Monday, February 16 



Tuesday, March 10 



"^ Wednesday, March 18 
Tuesday, April 14 

"^ Monday, April 20 
Tuesday, April 28 



POETRY FOR OUR TIME. Associate Professor 
John Holmes, Department of English. 

ARCHIBALD MACLEISH, reading from 
his poems. 

THE PERSONAL QUALITY OF VERGIL'S ART. 
Professor Van L. Johnson, Chairman, Depart- 
ment of Classics. 

DANTE AND HIS WORLD. Professor George 
H. Gifford, Wade Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages. 

JOHN CROWE RANSOM, reading 
from his poems. 

RICHARD WILBUR, reading from his 
poems. 

DONNE VS. SHAKESPEARE: THE ISLAND AND 
THE CONTINENT. Professor Kenneth O. Myrick, 
Chairman, Department of English. 

CARL SANDBVRQ, reading from his 
poems. 

WHITMAN: POETRY FOR DEMOCRACY. 
Associate Professor Wisner P. Kinne, Depart- 
ment of English. 

JOHN CIARDI, reading from his poems. 

ELIOT: POETRY AND CHRISTIANITY. Assistant 
Professor Sylvan Barnet, Department of English. 



This combined series of poetry readings and lectures is open to the Tufts 
University community at large. The readings of the five major American 
poets (listed in italic) comprise the Steinman Poetry Lectures, and are given 
on the dates listed in Cohen .Auditorium at 8:00 P.M. The University Lec- 
tures, each given by a distinguished member of the Tufts faculty, are in- 
tended to provide a continuing discussion of the historical conte.xt in which 
the ])oets' readings are made. These lectures are given at 8:00 P.M. in the 
Coolidge Memorial Room, Ballon Hall, on the dates listed. 



The 



X . TG 140 
. S 8 



Detroit News 



DECEMBER 21, 1958 




-sss^^ism 



Mackinac Bridge — 'Greatest in World' 



Gazing at 'Mighty Mac' 



HIGBTV MAC. by Lawrence A. 
Rubin; Wayne State Univer- 
sity Fress^ 

By STODDARD WHITE 

Sault Ste. Marie and St. 

Ignace were discovered 

almost a century before 

what is now Detroit. Not 

until 1669, or 32 years 
before Cadillac landed,. did 
white men even set foot 
In the Lower Peninsula. 

Coming west from what 
are now Montreal and To- 
ronto, the early explorers 
took a northern route 
which led thera onto the 
Great Lakes at Georgian 
Bay. Even Niagara Falls 
was a belated discovery. 

The early explorers 
looked with amazement ■ — 
or paddled through — the 
Straits of Mackinac. This 
w_a s a passage between 
Lakes Huron and Michi- 
gan, not a crossing place 
between the Upper and 
Lower Peninsulas. 

Even as civilization de- 
veloped in both peninsu- 
las, roads and railroads 
ended at the water's edge. 
Autos, trains and foot pa.s- 
sengers were ferried across 



the barrier — and many a 
northbound tourist turned 
back at Mackinac City 
when he learned he had a 
long boat ride ahead. 

Little more than a year 
ago, the barrier was for- 
ever broken. Steel and wire 
of the Mackirlac Bridge 
linked the peninsulas and 
united Michigan for the 
first time. 

In paraphrase, these are 
the words of Frank B. 
Woodford, Detroit news- 
paperman and historian. 'To 
him, author Rubin, execu- 
tive secretary of the Mack- 
inac Bridge Authority, must 
be indebted for his intro- 
duction — words in a book 
composed mainly of pic- 
tures. 

Rubin's work has been, 
of necessity, largely selec- 
tion and editing. This book 
is the pk-torjal story of the 
bridge, from the days 
before it was begun until 
the day it was dedicated^ 
longest suspension bridge 
In the world. 

The builder, D. B. Stein' 
man, says in the book it is 
"the greatest bridge in the 
world." Having designed 



many of the greatest, .he 
should know. 

Rubin's chief debt — and 
that of the reader — is to 
the bridge's photographers. 
Four thousand pictures and 
14,000 feet of movie film 
were shot during the four 
years of construction. The 
book, 'Mighty Mac," is a 
skillful culling of these to 
about 200, a step-by-step 
picture of an unsurpassed 
engineering feat. 

Excellent photography is 
matched by imaginative de- 
sign, typography and bind- 
ing which make the book 
a valuable souvenir as well 
as a valuable record. 

Prentiss M. Brown, chair- 
man of the bridge author- 
ity, identifies this as not 
only the authority's official 
pictorial history, but the 
second of three books. 

Neither the first — which 
will tell the over-all story 
in words — nor the third — 
the record of the bridge 
since it opened Nov. 1, 1957 
— has yet been written. But 
they are envisioned as com- 
panion volumes. 



Stoddard White is Tlie Dctiolt 
Newi marine writer. 



X. TG 140 



DECEMBER 8, 1958. 



.-S-8 



THE AUSTRALASIAN ENGINEER 



Dedication of Mictiigan's Mackinac Bridge 

Dr. STEINMAN'S DESIGN 
"One Of The Greatest Engineering Accomplishments Of Our Time" 



Michigan's Mackinac Bridge, the 
largest suspension bridge of the world, 
was dedicated now after four years of 
construction work, and it really is a 
marvellous work. Wilber M. Brudccr, 
Secretary of the Army, described the 
new five-mile span linking Michigan's 
upper and lower peninsulas as "one 
of the great engineering accomplish- 
ments of our time." 

Dr. Steinman's Achievements 

The' Franklin Institute in Philadel- 
phia has presented its Louis E. Levy 
Medal to the designer of the Mackinac 
Bridge, Dr. David B. Steinman, famous 
bridge builder. He received the medal 
in recognition of his outstanding 
paper," The Design of the Mackinac 
Bridge for Aerodynamic Stability". 
Here arc a few features of Dr. Stein- 
man's important new principles. 

The main span at Mackinac is ' 
suspension bridge. The stiffening 
trusses are 38 feet deep, or 1 /100th 
of the span length. This is the same 
ratio adopted, after years of exhaustive 
aerodynamic tests, for the proposed 
Severn River Bridge in England, and 
68% greater tthan the ratio of San 
Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge. 

An important feature contributing 
to the high degree of aerodynamic 
stability is the provision of wide open 
spaces between the stiffening trusses 
and the outer edges of the roadway. 
The trusses are spaced 68 feet apart 
and the roadway is only 48 feet wide, 
leavinp; open spaces 10 feet wide on 
each side, for the full lenRih of the 
suspension bridge. For further perfec- 
tion of the aerodynamic stability, the 
eauivalent of wide longitudinal open- 
ing is .provided in the middle of the 
roadway. 

The two outer lanes, each 12 feet 
wide, are made solid, and the two 
inner lanes and the centre mail (24 
feet of width) are made of open grid 
construction. Wind-tunnel tests have 
confirmed the high aerodynamic sta- 
bility of this design of cross-section. 
"The Mackinac Bridge represents a 
triumph of the new sccience of sus- 
pension bridge aerodynamics." 

The outstanding superior aerodyna- 
mis stability achieved in the Mackinac 
Bridge is best shown by a comparison 
with the critical velodties determined 
also by wind-tunnel investigattion for 
other notable suspension bridges. Dr. 
Steinman lists the critical wind velo- 
cities for the prior long-span bridges 
in the following tabulation: 



From Our New "Vork Correspondent. 

Critical 

Bridge Wind 

"Velocity 

Bronx-Whitestone, after 

addition of stiffening 

trusses — 30 m.p.h. 

Golden Gate 40 

George Washington 55 

New Tacoma Narrows 76 „ 

Makinac, with deck 

closed — 632 

Mackinac, with deck open, 

as designed Infinite 

A thorough aerodynamic investiga- 
tion was conducted by Professor F. B. 
Farquharson in the Suspension Bridge 
Laboratory at the University of Wash- 
ington covering the degree of aero- 
dynamic stability inherent in the design 
of the Mackinac Bridge. It was shown 
that the aerodynamic stability of the 
Mackinac Bridge exceeded all prior 
experience in aerodynamic investiga- 
tion. 

The wind-tunnel tests at the Uni- 
versity of Washington showed con- 
clusively, as prediaed by Dr. Stein- 
man, that the Mackinac Bridge, as 
designed has the following features: 

1) Complete and absolute aerody- 
namic stabihty against vertical oscill- 
ations at all wind velocities and all 
angles of attack; 

2) Complete and absolute aerodyna- 
mic stability against torsional oscill- 
ations ata ll wind velocities and all 
angles of attack; 

3) Complete and absolute aerody- 
namic stability against coupled oscill- 
ations (combining vertical and tor- 
sional) at all wind velocities and all 
angles of attack. 

The Mackinac Bridge with its ap 
proaches is 5 miles long. Its length 
from anchor bl ock to anchor block — 
between the ends of the 24i-inch 
cables that hold up the roadway — is 
8164 ft., or about 2000 ft. longer 
than the Golden Gate Bridge.- 

Another way of measuring suspeii- 
sion bridges is by the distance of the 
centre span, from tower to tower. 
Using this method the Golden Gate 
Bridge over the entrance to San 
Francisco Bay, with a 4,200 central 
span is 400 feet longer, while the 
central span of another famous sus- 
pension bridge, the George Washing- 
Con Bridge in New York, is 300 feel 
shorter. 

The $100,000,000-bridge is also the 
costliest in the world. The bridge is 
painted in forest green. It hangs from 
steel cable-, strung in a parabolic arc 
between giant towers as high as a 
fifty-seven-story building (above water 
height is 552 feet)'. 



Why Was the Bridge Built? 

The new bridge spans the Strait of 
Mackinac between Lake Michigan and 
Lake Huron. These waters divide the 
State of Michigan into the densely 
populated and highly industnaliseJ 
Lower Peninsula (with the industrial 
metropolis Detroit) and the sparsely 
populated Upper Peninsula. The latter 
has immense natural resources (part 
of it is known as "The Copper Coun- 
try") and is a popular vacation region. 

The state ferry service, which has 
been operating across the straits for 
some thirty-five years, was discontinued 
shortly after the bridge opened. Ac- 
cess to the Upper Peninsula now is 
easy. The five-mile ferry crossing took 
duced the crossing time to ten to 
over one hour. The bridge has re- 
twelve minutes. During the summer 
months, lines of waiting cars had ex- 
tended along the highway as far back 
as 30 miles from the ferry. 

Drivers had to stay over nights in 
cottages and boarding houses to resume 
their place in line in the morning. At 
an average toll ra.te of $3.25 (jEAI/8/-) 
for paMcnger can, more for truck* 
and tHuet, the estimated tnfic will b< 
two million can tod trucks in the cur- 
rent year. The bridge it (upposcd to 
pay for itself in 18 yetn. 



Ultra-Safety of tlte Bridie 

Some other bridges built by Dt. 
Steinman are the Thousand Islands 
International Bridge, the Mount Hope 
Brid-fce m Rhode Island, the St. John's 
Bridge m Portland. Oregon. He made 
the designs for the bridge across the 
South Channel of St. Lawrence River, 
and for the designs for the bridge 
which is planned to cross one day 
the Messina Strait between Sicily and 
Southern Italy. 

The Public had been alarmed by 
unscientific claims that no structure 
could withstand the ice pressure at the 
Straits of Mackinac. The maximum ice 
pressure ever obtained is 21,000 pounds 
per lineal foot of pier width. Dr. 
Steinman multiplied this figure by five, 
and designed the piers to bt safe for 
a hypothetical, impossible ice pressure 
of 115,000 pounds per lineal foot. 

Similarly, because the public had 
been told that no structure could resist 
the force of storms at the Straits, the 
design was made ultra-safe againsi 
wind pressure by Dr. Steinman. The 
greatest wind velocity ever recorded 
in the vicinity is 78 milt.s per hour; 
this represents a wind force of 20 
pounds per square foot. He multiplied 
this force fay 2^ and designed the 
bridge to be ultra-safe against a hypo- 
thetical, improbable wind pressure of 
50 pounds per square foot. 




X. TG 140 
S 8 



tablet 



A CATHOLIC WEEKLY 



BROOKLYN ] 7, \. Y., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 13, 1958 




The Star of Bethlehem 

A million stars proclaimed Thy glory, 
With neW-born light in one of them, 
The brightest in Thy diadem. 
To point the way to Bethlehem, 
When Love Divine waa born. 

A million hearts enshrine Thy story; 
Aglow with love as carols ring, 
We hear the angel voices sing 
As once to shepherd and to king 
On that first Christmas morn. 

— D. B. STEINMAN. 



BAU 



MASCHINE 



UND 



TECHNIK 



X. TG 140 

Building Machinery and ConstnicUon Medtods^ 
Madiines el Tediniques de Construction 



5. Jahrgong 



November 1958 



Heft 11 



Die Mackinac-Briidce 

DurdiKihrung der Bauarbeilen und Einsatz von Baumasdiinttn 

Construction equipment on the Mackinac Bridge 

L'equipement utilise pour la construction du pont sur les Straits of Mackinac 

Dr. D. B. Steinman und J. W. Kinney, New York 



7.-niam.m,iniaau-n.g 

Nach einem Icurzcn Uberblick iiber das gesamte Briicken- 
bauwerk mit 5,5 km Ldnge wird zundchst iiber die Griin- 
dungsarbeiten an den Briickenpfeilern berichtet, insbesondere 
an den Pfeilern der Hdngebriicke, die mit 2550 m Gesam.t- 
lange die groPte bisher gebaute Hdngebriicke ist. Der Ein- 
satz der hauptsdchlich schwimmfdhig ausgebildeten Bauma- 
schinen. Krdne, Bagger und einer Betonfabrik, wird an Hand 
von Abbildungen erldutert. Auch iiber die einzelnen Phasen 
der Montage des Briickenbauwerks in Stahlkonstruktion mit 
Betonfahrbahnplatte und Asphalibeton als Verschleipschicht 
wird berichtet. 

Summary 

The water crossing is 17,913 feet long, consisting of a suspen- 
sion bridge across the channel, and deck truss construction 
at both sides of the channel crossing. The land approaches 
including two viaducts, a filled causeway, a toll plaza, and 
the north approach road, bring the project length to five 
miles. The suspension bridge is 8,614 feet overall, the longest 
yet built. The machinery and equipment (cranes, a concrete 
mixing plant, etc.) was mostly mounted on steel barges. The 



steel erection equipment was of the conventional type, but 
some of the equipment ordinarily used on suspension bridge 
towers, cable spinning and stiffening truss erection were 
peculiar to this type of work. Conventional concrete was 
used on the deck and the wearing surface was made of as- 
phaltic concrete. 

Resume 

Le pont propre a une longueur de 5,5 km. Les auteurs discu- 
tent d'abord les travaux de fondation pour les piliers du 
pont, en particulier pour les pylones. Le pont suspendu a une 
longueur totale de 2550 m et est le plus long qui ait jamais 
ete construit. Les illustrations montrent l'equipement en 
machines pour la plupart flottantes utilise pour la construc- 
tion. L'article traite aussi les differentes phases du montage 
des elements en acier ainsi que de la inise en oeuvre du 
bcton de tablier et du beton asphaltique de la couche d'usure. 

Von dem bekannten amerikanischen Briickenbauer, Dr. D. 
B. Steinman, der den Entwurf fur die Macklnac-Briicke 
ausgearbeitet hat, und J. W. Kinney, seinem fiir die Bau- 
ausliihrung verantwortlichen Mitarbelter, ging uns ein Be- 
ridit Uber den Bau dieser BrUcke zu, dessen deutsche 
Fassung wir nachstehend veroffentlldien. 




Bild 1. Luftaufnahme der fertigen Mackinac-Brijcke von SiJdwesteft 

Mnckinac Bridge from the Southwest Vue aenenne du pont sur les Straits of Mackinac vu du sud-ouest 



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' ; ) 



DECEMBER 1958 
Vol. 28, No. 12 



NATIONAL 

/SOCIETY OF \ 

PROFESSIONAl. 

lENCINEERSJ 

*■ FOUNDEO I9J*, ' 



The Classics of 
Engineering 
Literature 



By 

WALTER JAMES MILLER 

Associate Professor of Englisli, New York Unix'ersiiy 




The author writes that the name of Dr. D. B. Stein- 
man, above, is "certain to remain on any bibliography 
of major engineering authors." 



* * * 



Another name certain to remain 
on any bibliography of major en- 
gineering authors is D. B. Stein- 
man. He has published hundreds 
of interesting, sometimes exciting, 
pamphlets, articles, papers, books 
on the mathematical, esthetic, struc- 
tural, ethical, theoretical facets of 
bridge building. Typical of his 



cogent, swift ])rose, his masterful 
attack on technical sidiject matter, 
is his paper on The Design of the 
Mackinac Bridge for Aerodynamic 
Stabilily (1957). 

Rensselaer Polytechnic is- 
sued a 28-page bibliography of the 
Irtlniical writings of D. H. Stein- 
man. 



♦ * * 



THE BENT 

of TAU BETA PI : 

Title Reg, U.S. Pat. Off. 



>f. TP 



1 1' 



s 



Volume XLIX 



DECEMBER, 1958 



Number 4 



TRIBUTE TO THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE 




D. B. Steinman 



ON THIS occasion of the 75th anniversary of 
the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge, I am 
glad to record my personal heartfelt tribute 
to this grand old structure, not only as "The Bridge" 
that has been my inspiration since boyhood but also 
as the best-known and the best-loved bridge in the 

world. 
f- ^^ "% When the Brooklyn 

t ^ '' Bridge was completed in 

/ *^ 1883, it was the engineer- 

LK^ ^5*^^ '"g achievement of the 

^^^' V. ^ century — the longest single 

— * .«J» i » span ever built, the tallest 

and strongest, the first sus- 
pension bridge in the world 
to use steel cables and steel 
trusses. Today there are 
bigger bridges, but they 
never could have been built 
had not Brooklyn Bridge 
shown the way. And its 
story is still the greatest bridgebuilding story of all. 

JOHN A. ROEBLING was the pioneer genius who 
developed the art of building great spans sus- 
pended from wire cables. In 1831 he came to America 
as a young immigrant, fleeing autocratic oppression 
and seeking freedom — freedom to work, to build, to 
achieve. During the years that followed he proved his 
talent and genius as an inventor and as a bridgebuilder, 
inventing wire rope and building one great span after 
another. 

In 1867 he was called to New York to plan and 
build his crowning lifework, the great span over the 
East River to connect Brooklyn and New York. For 
two years he worked feverishly to complete his plans, 
as though in a race against death. 

It was to be his dream bridge, the consummation of 
his life's ambition. From his first sight of a small 
suspension span in his student days, all of his longing, 
all of his preparation, all of his striving, were pointed 
toward this goal. By iron determination, by relentless 
concentration, by unsparing energy, by achievement 
after achievement, he had won this opportunity to 
create the world's greatest span. And now, from his 



By D. B. Steinman, New York Alpha '06 

brain and his soul, combining the genius of the 
mathematician, the builder, and the artist, he had 
crystallized the vision — the lines and the form, the 
power and the grace, the beauty and the magic of his 
masterwork. He had battled and overcome the forces 
of doubt and prejudice, and he had finally won the 
right to go ahead with the building of the Bridge. 

IN HIS heart and in his mind he saw the great 
bridge of his dreams — the magnificent pylons, en- 
during as the pyramids, founded on solid rock deep 
below the rushing tides; the powerful cables of steel 
sweeping downward and upward in the arc of Nature's 
law; and the arching roadway carrying the multitudes 
over a span greater and more beautiful than the world 
had ever seen. 

He saw it clearly as it was to be, "a great work of 
art," "the great engineering work of this Continent 
and of the age." Time was to justify his prophecy, 
and posterity was' to behold the magic and the power 
of the thing he had created. 

But he, who had dreamed and planned all this, was 
not to see the time-defying towers, or the vast sweep 
of the mighty cables, or the rushing thousands crossing 
on the far-flung span. He was not to see his bridge 
take form. He was not even to see the first stone laid. 

TRAGEDY struck. On July 6, 1869, while he was 
making the final surveys, the accident occurred 
which took the life of John A. Roebling. At the end 
of the race, with the goal in sight, fate exacted its toll 
— a toll doubly cruel by its timing. 

The master builder's dying words were, "The bridge 
will be beautiful!" 

With its inspiration gone, the Brooklyn Bridge 
seemed impossible to build. A new guiding spirit was 
needed to carry the great work forward. 

Dr. Steinman, internationally eminent engineer, has won 
many honors for his achievements in bridge design and construc- 
tion. One of his greatest accomplishments is the Mackinac 
Bridge in Michigan, recently completed, and he is currently de- 
signing a bridge across the Bosporus in Turkey. He was en- 
gaged a few years ago to supervise the modernization of the 
Brooklyn Bridge, in the shadow of which, on New York's lower 
east side, he was bom and raised. 



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DECEMBER 1958 
Vol. 28, No. 12 



X . TG 1 }T 
.S 8 



NATIONAL 

^SOCIETY OF \ 

PROFESSIONAL 

k ENGINEERS. 



The Classics of 
Engineering 
Literature 



By 

WALTER JAMES MILLER 

Associate Professor of English, New York University 




The author writes that the name of Dr. D. B. Stein- 
man, above, is "certain to remain on any bibliography 
of major engineering authors." 



Another name certain to remain 
on any bibliography of major en- 
gineering authors is D. B. Stein- 
man. He has published hundreds 
of interesting, sometimes exciting, 
pamphlets, articles, papers, books 
on the mathematical, esthetic, struc- 
tural, ethical, theoretical facets of 
bridge building. Typical of his 
cogent, switt prose, his masterful 
attack on technical sidjject matter, 
is his paper on The Design of the 
Mackinac Bridge for Aerodynamic 
Stability (l<,)r)7J . 

Rensselaer Polytcc luiic is- 
MU'cl a 28-|5age bitjliograpliv oi the 
Icihniral writings ol D. ]>. Sicin- 
iiian. 

Stcinmaii has uritlcii liu- (uiixiu 
artides on "lit idgcs" lor scvcial 
stanthuil cik \( lopeilias: Mi])erb 
inaga/inc articles on mk li Mihjects 
as ■■{•(•aiilv and Its Xixational Syni- 
l)i)K;" and Imu' popular books. 
Mixiilc tividiic (it Mriil;ni/i( ( n)")7, 



in collaboration with [. \c\ill) 
actually makes the most technical 
cliffuidties of this project iiUclligi- 
ble to the public. Ihidges and their 
liiiildrrs (1910, in c ollaboi ation 
\vith ,S. Watson) is more than a 
good histors; it is an intellectual 
chronicle ol the figlit anainst igno- 
rance and picjiidicc, a dedicated 
study ol the kind ol moial c harac ter 
that makes an engineer. Steinman 
has also used \ cise as a medium lor 
|)eispec live on his lilc and his 
world; he has published a small vol- 
imie and won several respeclablc 
|)oetry prizes. Like lellord, he has 
earned the praise ol orolessional 
poets; .Maiiaiuie .\fooie, lor ex- 
ample, has enjoyed his "concept ol 
the bridge as a 'raiid)ow''." .Stein- 
man is at his best in bis intellectual 
and narrative pcjeiry, in which he 
s])eaks trenchantly ol cNolution, 
racial discrimination, synrbcjiisui of 
the l)ridiie. 



D. B. STEINMAN 

Consulting Engineer, New Vorl 



X . TG 140 
. S 8 



LONG-SPAN BRIDGES 



GREAT spans are man's defiance of nature's challenge. 
Bridges are an expression of man's constructive 
spirit — his urge to overcome barriers, to master the forces 
of nature, to speed travel, to link communities, to widen 
horizons. In many ways the story of bridgebuilding is the 
story of civilization. In region after region around the 
globe, the development of a couniry has awaited the build- 
ing of bridges and has kept pace with the progress in the art. 

Around 1870. the era of long-span bridges was born. 
Bridge building began to be transformed from an empirical 
craft to a scientific art. As the design of bridges evolved, 
so did their materials. With steel and mathematics, the 
ugly iron trusses of the early railroad era gave way to new 
bridge forms, forms combining strength and beauty — the 
modern arch, cantilever, continuous truss, and suspension 
bridges. 

The longest spans thus far attained for the various 
bridge types are presented in Tabic 1. 



Arch Bridges 

The longest-span arch bridges are given in Tabic 11. 

The Eads Bridge over the Mississippi River at St. 
Louis, built 1867-74 by Capt. James B. Eads, with three 
hingeless arch spans of 502, 520 and 502ft, was the largest 
and boldest arch bridge of its day, and is still in use. This 
structure represented the first use of pneumatic caissons in 
the founding of large piers, the first major use of the 
cantilever method, the first use of hollow tubular 
chord members, and the first use of high-strength alloy 
steel as a bridgie material. Its success inspired modern 
steel arch construction. 



One of the greatest arches of all time was the Hell 
Gate Bridge over the East River at New York City, with 
a span of 977!ft, completed in 1917 the crowning 
achievement of Gustav Lindenthal. The .'suspended road- 
way carries four railroad tracks on a heavy ballasted floor. 
The outline of the arch, framed between great masonry 
towers, produces a monumental composition. 

TABLE II. — LONGEST-SPAN ARCH BRIDGES 



Year 


Bridge 


Location 


Span 
(in feet) 


ly.^i 


Kill van Kull 


New York C it\ 


U.52 


19.12 


.Sidney Harhoui 


Allslralia 


\(<}0 


\'>}5 


Birchcnt)ugh 


Southern Rhodesia 


1080 


1955 


Naga-.aki-.Saschii 


Kui-.hu K.. Japan 


1042 


1417 


Hell Calc 


New Yiiik < il\ 


977 S 


1941 


RainbDw 


Niagara |-alK 


950 



Inspired by the Hell Gate arch. Ihe Sydney Harbour 
Bridge, built l')24-.'?2. is al.so a parabolic steel arch of the 
half-through type. The ambition of the Australians to boast 
the longest arch span in the world was frustrated, however. 
Another arch, begun \\\c years after the Sydney Bridge but 
completed four months earlier (1931). was made 25 inches 
longer in span. The Sydney Span is I60fl; the Bayonne 
Bridge over the Kill van Kull at New York City was made 
1652ft lin. In 1935 Ralph Freeman completed the 
Birchcnough Bridge in Southern Rhodesia, with an arch 
span of 1080ft. the third longest in the world. 



TABLE I. — THE WORLDS LONGEST SPANS FOR VARIOUS BRIDGE TYPES 



Type 


Bridge 


Location 


Year 
Completed 


Span 
(ill feet) 


t able Suspension 


Golden Gate 


San hrancisco 


i9.n 




4:(K) 


1 ranspoitcr Bridge 


+ .Sks Ride 


C hicago 


193.1 


1X511 


C antilevcr 


* yuebee 


C anada 


1917 


IXtHI 


Steel Arch 


Kill van Kull 


New Yoik 


1931 


K.52 


Eycbar Suspension 


* f-iorianopolis 


Brazil 


1926 


1 1 14 


Concrete Arch 


Sando 


Sweden 


1943 


XM. 


Continuous Girder 


River .Save 


Belgrade 


19S6 


X5(. 


Continuous 1 russ 


t^ubuque 


Mississippi River 


1943 


X45 


Simple Truss 


• Metropolis 


Ohio River 


1917 


720 


Vertical Lift 


* (ape Cod C .Liial 


Mass.ichusells 


193.'! 


.s44 


Wichert Truss 


Homestead 


Pittsburgh 


1937 


.stV, 


Swing Span 


* hort Madison 


Mississippi River 


1927 


.■125 


Tubular Girder 


* Britannia 


Menai Straits 


1850 


4W) 


Timber Span 


* McKcnzie Rivet 


( Dburg. Ore. 


1916 


}m 


Prestressed Concrete Girder 


Worms 


(jcrmany 


1953 


.17s 


Bascule 


* .Saull Ste. Marie 


Michigan 


1914 


."fi 


Simple Girder 


Harlem River 


New York 


1951 


}Mi 


Masonry Arch 


Plauen 


Saxony 


1903 


29S 


Single leaf Bascule 


♦ Ihlh Street 


( hicago 


1919 


2Wt 


Concrete Girder 


Villcneuve 


Seine River 


1939 


2.sf. 













Not standing. 



*R;ulio.nJ biidtic 



Centenary Number, December 1958 



THE INDIAN & EASTERN ENGINEER' 



INSTITUTO TfCNICO Dt LA CONSTRUCCICN Y DEI CEMENTO 

X. TG 140 
, S 8 



DAVID B. STEINMAN 

puente de Mackinac 

ArUculo publicado en el n.° 105 de la 
Revista Informes de la Construccion 

Noviembrt 1958 



OepbBlto legal- M, Sep. 592-1958 \. 

PATRONATO .JUAN DE LA CIERVA. 06 invESTIGACIOn TECNICA DEL CONSEJO SUPERloe DE INVESTIGACIONES CIENT|F(CAS Vi 



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MICHIGAN'S MIGHTY MACKINAC ^^( 

From Engineering News-Record and U. 5. Steel News 



(he mighty Mackinac Bridge will be studied by 
bridge engineers from all over the world for the lessons 
it can teach in construction procedures and its wind 
resistant provisions. It is the longest uninterrupted 
crossing over water in the world— nearly five miles, of 
which three-and-two-fifths miles are spanned by steel. 
Nearly half of this is covered by the world's second 
longest suspension bridge. 

A suspension bridge was required across the Straits 
of Mackinac because it is the only type of structure 
capable of spanning the deep channel. It replaces five 
ferries, which in favorable weather could transport 416 
automobiles an hour for a 45 to 55 minute trip as 
compared to 600 cars per hour for a ten to twelve 
minute trip on the bridge— without any interruption 
from ice or wind. 

Each of the 552-ft towers contains 6500 tons of steel 
topped by two 30-ton saddles that cradle the suspen- 
sion cables. Overall, there are 66,500 tons of steel in 
the superstructure. The towers are supported by piers 
descending 200 ft to bedrock, and the anchorages for 
the cables rise as high as a ten-story building above 
water level and cover almost as much area as one-third 
of a football field. 

The identical suspended side spans are 1800 ft long, 
extending from the towers to piers carrying the cable 




bents. The cables are extended over these steel frames 
to cable anchorages 472 ft closer to shore. By locating 
the cable terminals beyond the ends of the suspended 
spans, it was possible to place the anchorages where 
rock foundations could be found at moderate depths. 

Since the bridge erection work could be carried on 
for only eight months of the year at the Straits, it was 
necessary to schedule operations carefully, with par- 
ticular attention to the most difficult part of the 
project— the suspension span. Plans called for the erec- 
tion of the backstay spans in 1955 so that catwalks 
for the cable spinning could be erected as soon as the 
Straits were free of ice in 1956. 

In order to save erection time, each backstay span 
was assembled on shore and floated to the span site 
Falsework was erected on two barges with the top 
slightly higher than the level of the piers that the span 
would rest on. Then the backstay span— 472 ft long 
and weighing 750 tons— was assembled on the false- 
work. After the barges were carefully maneuvered 
between the anchor and cable bent piers, the barges 
were flooded with water. As the barges settled deeper 
into the water and as the backstay span inched into its 
position atop the piers, it was fitted with anchorage 
shores and fastened with steel pins. 

The bridge towers weathered a winter of heavy gales 
with only about half of the riveting completed. As is 
customary with such a structure, they were bolted 
together when they were erected, and the following 
spring they were replaced with ri\ets. Since the rivet- 
ing and welding had to be done from the inside out, 
JTi dark confined cells, the men wore electric cap-lamps 
powered by special batteries. The stringing of exten- 
sion lines would have created a footing hazard and 
possible short circuits through abrasive wear of the 
insulation. Each tower had a temporary construction 
elevator, which facilitated the movement of the rivet- 
ers and their equipment to and from their work. 

While riveting was being completed in the towers, 
the erection of the 28 approach spans got under way— 
16 on the south approach and 12 on the north. All the 
sti'clwork for tliese deck truss spans were fastened 
with high strength bolts. 

Erection of tlie 89 stillening trusses was a combina- 
tion of tiTiie-tested methods on similar bridges and new 
procedures tailored to fit the particular job. The tniss 
si'ctioiis ranged up to 130 tons for one panel of two 
trusses w ith their cross bracing. They had to be hoisted 
a niaxinmm of 155 ft above water level and the opera- 
tion had to be synchronized to keep the sections level 
at all time. 

Erection crews worked both ways from the towers. 
Since the bridge is symmetrical about its center line. 



Sonderdruck aus: DER STAHLBAU 



. Jahrgang, Seite 161 lits 165 
Heft 6 - Juiii l'(58 



^ eriag von \^ ilhelni Ernst & Sohn. Berlin-Wilmersdorf, Hohenzollerndamm 169 



Die Briicke iiber die SlraBe von Mackinac, USA 

^ on Dr.-Ing. Frank Schwarz. Holland. Micliiftan. ISA 
I)k 621.3 Hiiiigchruil>ru 



1. E i n 1 e i t u n g 

Am 1. November 1957 wurde die lanpste Haugebriicke der Welt 
deni Verkehr ubergebcn. Die etwa 6 km lange Aniage iibergpauut 
die -Maokinac-Stralie zwischeu dem Midiigan- nnd Hnron-See in den 
Vereiniglen Staateii. Wie aus der Obersiilitszeiilinnng (Bild 1 




Bilil 1. <M'ograpliis(4ie Lage »ler MatJiiuac-StraBe iu Midiigau (USA) 

iind 2) ersiditliA, ist die Lage dieser Briicke reeht eigenartig. Sie 
erbebt ihre 168 m boben Pylone in einer flaclien. sparlidi hesie- 
delten (^egend. fern von GroBstiidten und Industriezenlren. Die 
niirlisten GroBstadte (Cliioago und Detroit) sind 600 km weiter 
siidlidi. 

Trotzdem erwartet man einen jiibrlidien \erkebr von mud zwei 
Miltionen Fabrzengen, ilie eine Gebiibr von $ 3.23 pro Wagen (und 
entsprerltend bobere Zolle fiir Lastwagen) zablen werden. .Auf die- 
sen gepriiflen \ erkebrssdiatzungen bat mau die Finanzierung der 
100 Milliouen $ gegriindet, die fiir den Ban erforderlidi waren. 

Die nene Briicke stellt niinilidi die kiirzeste uud bequemste \ er- 
liiiidung (lar zwisHicn den induslriereidien Slaatcn an den 1 fern 
der groBen Seen (Obio, Iniliana. Midiigau) nnd tien Staaten des 
Wcstcus (Wisconsin, Minnesota. INortb Dakota nsw.). AuBerdem 
liegt die Mackinac-StraBe in iinmittelbarer Niibe der kanadisdicn 
tirenze im Herzen der Provinz Ontario, weldie seit deni lelztcn 
Vi eltkrieg in einem nngrabnten wirtsdiafllidien Anfscliwnng be- 
griffen ist. Die Mineralsdijitze und Neuansietllung von Imniigranten 
baben die F.rridilung zablreidier neuer Industrien bervorgebradit. 



fiir weldie die nene Brii(ke eine willkommene \ erbindung zu den 
\ ereinigten Staaten berstellen wird. 

Zwisdien den zwei kleinen Stiidten Mackinac - City und 
Saint Ignace bestand sdion seit vieleu Jabren eine staatlidie Fiibre 
fiir SlraBenfabrzeuge. wiibrend die ))rivaten Eisenbabniinien ibre 
eigenen Trajektscbiffe benutzten. Aufang der Jagdsaison bildeten 
sidi an den Zugiingen der Fiibren bis zu 2.5 km lange Wagen- 
kolonnen. die nnglaublidie Wartezeiteu, bis zu 16 Stunden, er- 
fordertcn. 

Als Ergebnis der eiugebenden tedmisdien und Hnanziellen Vor- 
studien, die die zu diesem Zweck 1950 gegriindete Gesellscbaft 
..Mackinac Bridge Autbority" anstellte. wurde im Januar 1953 die 
endgiiltige Projektierung Dr. Steiuman und Dipl.-Ing. Woodruff 
iibertragen. Die Finanzierung gestattete jedoch erst 1954 niit den 
eigentlidien Bauarbeiten zu beginnen. 

Die Briicke wurde trotz vieler tedinischer und klimatisdier 
Sdiwierigkeitcn programuigemiiB am 1. November 1957 dem Ver- 
kehr iibergeben. Auf diesen Termin waren aucb die erwarteten 
ersten Einnahmen beredinet worden. 

2. A I I g e m e i n e B e s e b r e i b u n g und G r ii n d u n g 

Wie aus Bild 3 ersiditlidi, bestebt die Mackinac-Briicke aus drei 
banlidi getrennten Teilen: die siidlicbe Auffahrt von 1735 m Liinge, 
bestebend aus 16 Stablfadiwerktragern auf Betonpfeilern; es folgt 
die eigentliilie Haugebriicke, die sidi von Verankerung zu Ver- 
ankerung 2627 ni erstreckt, mit einer mittleren Offnung von 1158 m 
zwiscben den zwei Haupttiirmen, und sdilieBlidi die 1100 m lange 
niirdlidie Anffabrt (zwiilf Fadiwerktriiger auf Betonpfeilern), die 
auf einen sdion friiber erriditeten alten Damni iibergebt. 

Die freie Hiibe der Briidie betriigt 46 ni iiber normalem \^ asser- 
nivcau, so daB die griiBten Fraditscbiffe uugebindert gleidizeitig in 
beiden Riditungen unter der Briicke verkehren konnen. Die Briicke 
bat vier StraBenfabrbabnen mit einer Gesamtbreite von etwa 17 m, 
eiusdilieBlidi cines Betriebssteiges. Die beiden Fabrtriditungen 
sind durdi einen 1 m breiten Streifen getrennt. Die Pylonfunda- 
mente wurden auf den Rami einer Unterwasserrinne im offenen 
Senkkaslenverfabren gebaul. Jeder Pylon ruht auf zwei zylindri- 
sdien Eisenbetonfundamenten von je 12 m Diirdunesser. Diese ge- 
trennten. rniulen Fundaniente erstrecken sidi von 8 m iiber Nasser 
bis -3 111 unter Wasser. \ on dieser Tiefe ab stebeii sie auf einem 
gemeinsainen runden Fiindierungsturni von ungefiibr 38 m Durch- 
messer. der 70 m tief auf I'rfelseii gegriindet ist. Dieser Enlwurf 
entslaiid aus der Notwendigkeit. eine iniigliilist geringe. runde 
(*berHiidie zu ('rzielen. iim ilas .-Vnbaufen von Eismassen weitest- 
gebi-nd zu vermeiden. 




Su-iiiniaiiu? Ori(!ilial-Elilwurf 



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Scimitar and Song 



August, 1958 



IN A GAEIDEN LONG AGO 
D. B. Steinman 



I remember summer roses in a garden long ago; 
You were with me, my beloved, in the golden moonlight glow. 
A nightingale was singing in the dreamy woodland grove 
And all the longing of my heart was in his song of love: 

You are sweet, sweet, sweet, my darling. 

Oh, my love, I love you sol 
The nightihgale was singing in a garden long ago. 



I remember summer magic, all the sweetness in the air. 

The honeysuckles blending v/^ith the fragrance of your hair. 

The melody of moonlight and the starlight in your eyes 

Were mingled with the glory of the stars that filled the skies. 

You are sweet, sv/eet, sweet, ray darling. 

Oh, my love I love you so.' 
All the stars were singing in a garden long ago. 






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C H R M A T O N E S 

April Number 
1958 



A LEGEND OF CREATION 
By D. B. Steinman 

God proclaimed: Let there be Light! 
He flung a million gleaming stars 
Against the velvet black of night. 

The clouds of glowing Stardust swirled 

To fill the skies with golden glory. 

Then God reached out and made the World. 

Three men stood by — a loyal band. 
They saw each spinning planet hurled 
In ordered orbit from His hand. 

With Venus, Jupiter, and Mars, 

The Earth, in flight-path, found its place 

Amidst the galaxy of stars. 

As they beheld Divine Creation 
Shine forth in majesty through space. 
The men knelt down in adoration. 

And one man asked, "How was this done?" 
God answered. "Seek, and thou shalt find!" 
The quest of Science had begun. 

"How beautiful!" cried one, inspired. 
God said, "Thou too. create in beauty!" 
With joy the Artist's soul was fired. 

The third man yearned, with wonder filled, 
To do such tilings as God had wrciught. 
God said, "Go forth — to plan and build!" 

The Engineer, with consecration. 

Went forth to dream, and build his dreams — 

To add new works to God's Creation. 

— David B. Steinman 





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THE BARN DOOR 

D, B. Stelnman 

"Hi, young feller, want to see 
Something you ain't seen before?" 
The old man led me through his barn 
And then rolled back a sliding door. 
Behind us, musty timbered gloom ; 
Before us — apple trees in bloom ! 

The dawn glow lent an aura to 
The orchard under springtime light; 
Soft blossoms covered every bough 
Like gentle snowflakes caught in flight. 
Faint apple breath borne on the air 
Whispered the lure of nectar there. 

A spell was traced against the blue. 
The inscape of a veil so spun 
Of petals, air and light and dew. 
"Ain't that a pretty sight, my son?" 
He understood my speechless nod. 
My silent thanks to him— and God. 



SPRING 1958 



PENINSULA POETS 



Volume XIII Winter 1958 Number 1 



^> 



CHILD OF ISHMAEL 



Your infancy beheld a world that smiled, 

And you smiled back — a happy, laughing child. 

Too soon the years despoiled your paradise 
Sheltered by love and hymned by lullabies. 

Your tragedy is etched upon your face, 
Pariah, branded for your alien race. 

The cross of fire becomes a blasphemy — 
Man's blazing boast of inhumanity. 

Child of Ishmael, hounded by the pack, 
Your only crime is that your skin is black. 

— David B. Steinman 

in Wisconsin Poetry Magazine 



International Section 






Projects 
Around the 
World 



Saulf Sfe. Marie Span Nears Reality 

^\nh the retention rlnr,n„ t...,„ _r t. . ^INIAKIO 



^\uh the retention dunns June of Dr. 
D. B Stennna,,, to prepare a prehminary 

J^ey report, mprepa.ation for financing 

f the proposed SIl to .S15millK,n interna 

nond crossing of the St, Mary's Rner at 

Saul Ste. Mane, M.chigan and Ontario, 

^°?--!°"8'u project took a major step 
foruard. The retainer was arranged by th? 
Omano Department of Htghlays'and 

1 e Mtchtgan State Htghnay Department, 
^ J^h are handhng the prelin.inarv cost 

and have agreed to construct the ap- 
proaches for the project. Since then tlfe 
Sau t Ste. Marie. 0„t.. City Counc, i 
<^]]y established its local 'approach s. e 
ami .s rev,.smg its traflK planning in the 

Recent completion of the Mackinac 

Bndge. miles to the south and constru" 
^-" '^y the Ontario Depart.nent of High, 
u^s of a new scenic Inghwav. which ,s ex- 
Ptctcd to become a n>ajor tourist attrac- 

fon (from Canada's Sault C:itv north ml 
-tu-ard around l.ke Superior to f^ln 
VMllam) have expanded ,l,e local pres- 

-;^ the crossing mto a state and ,!ro; 

Mi!.!'' ''■" ^"'' "«^"^'« involved are 
i^^ch.gans International Hrt.lge Author- 

•y. or^nudly created in 19^5 to study e 
feasdji tv Mf ■. ^;f >r • .. ^i^'") uic 



plans are for Michigan to butld the Vmeri- 

can and the Province of Ontanothe^m. 
clian approaches, while the I.uernational 
Bndg^Authority, through agreemetu^ 
ts Canadian counterpart, would conduct 
he revenue bond financing of the b d^e 

xpec^edin^^^^^ 
expected in Michigan to pro^ ide specifi 

cally for the freeing of the bridge',' 
^^^^el^nds have been paid off, tX 

r^ceral (i 'i'" ^'I^'^^"-''- ^'■■^i'^le for 
Juleral .Aid under the Interstate hi.hw.v 
program. Canadian authorities have i 
.'hey would like to have toll T^n.'^ 
n-lcfinuely on the crossing i„ ^ ,"' 
provide maintenance, but have ex e Ld 
themselves willing to yield the p 'i t .t 
'"-cler to get the project started 

An arrangement was made ,,u,, ,j,, ,^ 

B-Ste.nman last year bv the Intel-nation .1 
Bridge .Authority for design ol „ 

A/arys crossing. The plan ,s to span the 
"ver immediately above the Soo' ..U 

"'■'■^". 'cet long, u-,th 125 feet of clearance 



^aMbihty c.f a St. Mary's toll crossing and 

' -"^''fn the event studies justifial i 
andtheSt.Marv'sRiverKridgx'co.,ltc' 
a Canadian body formed some six ^ ears a-.;; 
onduct Canadian arrangements am 
^^hose Ui. recentiv was extendul. Presen 



the Canachan I.OC k.tarly ,,,;„,„,, ,,^, 

":V^'''^''^''^'™'hrKlgeat.SI|,.oooo 
with .S.lOOO.OOO for \„„. ' 'oo.UUU, 

" "" Vn'eiican and S2„-,00. 
" -Kulian approaches and S5,5.)0, 
*'"h„,h, actual water crossing. I Yallic 

-•-"Hhcateonlv a minimum ;^asi, 
h>' financing the entire project bv „ II 

-venue but with the appi^.ach costs p 
h) others Ic-asibilitv ,., the remain, I,,- 



140 



) 



1 9 3 S 



WHO'S WHO 



111 



WORLD POETRY DAY 




DAVID B. STEINMAN, Bridge Engineer and Poet— 400 
bridges on five continents, including the world's largest. 
Author 20 books and 600 professional papers. Four col- 
lege degrees and 19 honorary ones. 



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LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



'•■ G 1 -.(; 



':8 




REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT OF LOYOLA UNIVERSITY TO THE CITIZENS BOARD 
Given at the Chicago Club, Tuesday, October 7, 1958 



Intellectual and Professional Activities 



Thmiigliotit the SS yciirs of its existence, Lovola lias been con- 
seious of Its obligation as a cultural center to offer intellectually 
Jtiniulatnig programs to its own students and to the conniiunitv. 
This past vcar was no exception. Once again, through the 
generosity of Doctor David B. Stcimiian, the architect of the 
new Mackinac Bridge, we were able to bring to Chicago six 
distinguished British and Ainerican poets for a \'isiting Poets 
Lecture Series. This most recent series featured W. H. Aiiden, 



own Pulit/cr Prize winner. 



Marianne Moore and Chicago's 
Gwendolyn Brooks. 

An indication of the uitense interest evidenced in this series 
is the fact that the demand for tickets for the lectures usually 
outran the capacity for our downtown campus facilities. 




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BIG MAC SHINES 



World's longest suspension bridge 
lighted for night safety, comfort 



,S8 



The world's longest suspension 
bridge, connecting the upper and 
lower peninsulas of Michigan 
across the Straits of Mackinac, is 
also among the world's best 
lighted. 

Opened to traffic late last year, 
the Mackinac Bridge is five miles 
(26,372 feet) long, making it the 
longest suspension bridge in the 
world. Actual length of the main 
span between two 552-foot tow- 
ers is 3,800 feet, second only to 
the Golden Gate Bridge. The 
bridge carries a 48-foot roadway, 
accommodating four lanes of 
traffic separated by a mall. 

The beautiful, all-weather 
bridge supplanted a ferry service 
and cut crossing time for motor- 
ists from 53 minutes (exclusive 
of waiting time and bad-weather 
delays) to only 10 minutes — 
while greatly increasing comfort 
and safety. 

To maintain that comfort and 
safety at night, "Big Mac" is 
lighted by 248 modern General 
Electric Form 400 mercury-va- 
por luminaires, mounted 30 feet 
high and spaced no more than 



160 feet apart. Lighting is pro- 
vided for approaches, the bridge 
itself, and the toll plaza. 

General Electric also supplied 
ballasts, constant - current and 
distribution transformers, circuit 
breakers, and fuse cutouts for the 
lighting system. The Edison 
Sault Electric Company supplies 
590 kw for the north side of the 
system, while an additional 180 
kw for the south half is furnished 
by the Consumers Power Com- 
pany. 

Newspapers, businessmen, and 
the public had long advocated a 
bridge or tunnel connecting the 
peninsulas, but it was not until 
1954 that bonds were sold to fi- 
nance the project. Construction 
began in May 1954, and the 
bridge opened November 1, 
1957, at a cost of more than $80- 
million. 

At midspan, this modern engi- 
neering marvel is 155 feet above 
the water, allowing ample clear- 
ance for even the largest Great 
Lakes ships. The 552-foot towers 
extend another 210 feet below 
the water. 



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X-TG140 
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NEW YORK 



Professional 
Engineer 



September - October 1958 • Vol. 15 - No. 5 



BOOKS « * » f or your Engineering Library 



Bridges and Their Builders 



By David B. Steinman and S. R. 
Watson. Contains 401 pages, ^% x 
8, 23 photos, 26 drawings. Paper- 
bound, $1.95. Published by Dover 
Publications, Inc., 290 Broadway, 
New York 10, N. Y. 

Bridge-science from the earliest 
times to the present is covered in this 
works. It tells about the ideas behind 
bridge engineering, the men who built 
bridges, the special difficulties each 
overcame, and the history of great 
bridges throughout the world. The 
authors explain in everyday terms the 
problems of stress, aerodynamic flow, 
supports, braces, eyebar chains, rock- 
er towers and similar matters. 



.88 




Traveling derricks set 108-ft length of closing steel in 387-ft record-breaking plate- 
girder span. This structure over Quinnipiac River carries six lanes ol Turnpike traffic. 



LONGEST PLATE-GIRDER SPAN in Western 
Hemisphere carries Turnpiiie through New Haven 

R. M. BOYNTON, Associate Engineer with D. B. Steinman, Consulting Engineer, New York, N. Y. 



I lie Quinnipiac River Bridge at New 
Huvpii, with it? central three-span con- 
tinuous jilate-cirfler unit, is the largest 
.-triictiire on the 12y-inile half-billion 
dollar Connecticut Turnjiike. Its span 
lengths are 258, 387 and 258 ft, the 
center span being the longest for this 
type of construction in the Western 
Hemisphere. The previous record of 
oTo ft was held jointly by two bridges 
on the New Jersey Turnpike, those 
over the Hackensnck and Passaic 
Rivers. 

The record-breaking span crosses the 
Quinnipiac River at its confluence with 
the Mill River only 375 ft upstream 
from the existing Tomlinson Bridge 
which carries the I5oston Post Road, 
Route U.S. 1. The waterway is only 
12.') fi wide between fenders at the 



Tomlinson Bridge, beyond which there 
is a sharp turn to the right for boats 
going up the Quinnipiac and an even 
sharper turn to the left for those 
going up the Mill River. Provision for 
safe navigation through this funnel re- 
quired the span length of 387 ft for 
the Quinnipiac Bridge. Additional 
dredging was required at the head of 
the "Y" formed by the two rivers. 
This ]irovided a turning basin and 
obviated the need for an even longer 
and more expensive bridge at this 
crossing. 

The major structure over the Quin- 
nii)iac River, carrying the six lanes of 
Turn])ike traffic, is nine-tenths of a 
mile long. This includes the reconl- 
breaking three-sijan continuous unit 
903 ft long; 2,541 ft of simple-span 



girders varying from 125 to 175 ft 
in span length; and 1,290 ft of simple- 
beam spans \arying in length from 57 
to 93 ft. In addition, the west end of 
the structure is widened at two loca- 
tions to accommodate ramp structures 
of simple-beam construction. At the 
east abutment, the roadway is widened 
to 120 ft to provide access and exit 
ramps to city streets. 

Section 17 of the Connecticut Turn- 
pike, which is located within downtown 
New Haven, includes in its 1.48-mile 
length a triple interchange for three 
major highways as well as the major 
bridge over the Quinnipiac River. 
There are also seven individual grade- 
separation structures of three or four 
s])ans each (simple-beam type) vary- 
ing in length between 40 and 109 ft. 



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KALEIDOGRAPH 



Second Quarter, 1958 



• 



MELODY 

MOONLIGHT is melody 
Gentle as grass ; 
Sorrow is ebony 
Stubborn as brass. 

Hope sets the melody 
For lover and lass ; 
But drumbeat of ebony 
Shatters the glass. 

— D. B. Steinman 



>(-T(J: WO 



Songs 

of the 

Open Road 



THIS GLADNESS I HAVE KNOWN 



I have seen a bluebird on the wing 
Above a field in gold and scarlet hue; 
A spray of apple blossoms in the spring 
In shimmering light against a slsy of blue. 

I have known the joy of perfect days, 
A grassy banlc, a stream in jeweled glow; 
Then oak and maple leaves in autumn blaze, 
And pines in winter, aureoled in snow, 

D. B, Steinman 



The Blue River Press, 

Shelbyville, Indiana. JUNE 1958 






KOPRULER VE INSUIIJIR 



Beton ve ^elik §airi 

Dr. Steinman 



Pr. D. B. Steinman, Bogazi;i asma koprusunun 
projelerini hazirlayan mefhur kbprij miihendlsi- 
dir. A;agida okuyacaginiz bu yazi, onun 
hayati ve ;ahsiyeti hakkinda bir fikir vere- 
cek ve buyiik bir miihendls oldugu kadar, 
iyi bir matematikqi, ?air ve edebiyat?i olan 
Dr. Steinman'in bir portresini ^iiecektir. 



1953 senesi sonunda (Iflnya- 
nin en bUyak koprvl mUhen- 
disinden vilba^i tebrikl ai- 
mi? nlan kimseler valniz hatirda 
Bayildiklari iQln degil fakat gok 
gUze! bir kartin kendilerine ?6n- 
derildlgini gormekle zlyadeslyle 
meiniiun oldular D.B Steinman. 
en son asma kopriisu aMackinac 
Straits kopra5a» niln renkli fo- 
to?rafini vollamisti Tebrik <ai^ 
tin:n ifinde llfin metre agikli^li 
asma kopriiniin resmi. kapafem 
disinda isp &u ibareler vaziliydi 
(1) 

KOPRQNUN SARKISl 

Alcalip viikselen sularui Uze- 
rinden asarak ruzgiirin dal|?a!ari 
oksadiS' yerde duruvorum 

in^anlan saadrtr ^otUrecek o 
al&imisema yolunun ylikunii bea 
ta^ivorum 

!). B SlPiniiKUi 

Diinyanin en buvUk kiiprU mii- 
hoiuiislerinden bir; olan Dr Da. 
vad Barnard Stelnmar.'in havaM 
•.njki h:r knprii i>il)idir Beton ve 
fplikle mevdaiia qietirrlij; e-.pr;?- 
rindekl siizelHsl yazdigi ?llriere 
aktiPt'irerpk beton ve feliSin i?air: 
oltnujtur, 

BugUn 71 ya^inda olan Dr Ste- 
inman ddnvada nadir kimselerin 
na:l oUltigu bir basari i'.e mazl 
ve tetikba'.e bakmaktadir 

4no e vakin koprii-ni 'iiiiivanin 
her kitasmda (Afrika bar.i;) yol- 
lari kitalari birbirine baiilamaX- 
ta. nehirlerl asmakta nakil vasi- 
talarmi rasimaktadir (2) Anien- 
kadaki Waldo - Hancock. 3t 
Johns. Triborough. Almanvadaki 
Koln ■ MUhlheim. Avustralvad.i- 
ki Sydney Harbor. Brezllvadaki 
Plorianapoli.s. BJanadadaki Grand 
Mere koprillerlnin projelerini 
Steinman vapmistir Michigan'da 



Mackinac Bogasinda 100 milvon 
dolarlik asma koprUsOntin ac^'.is 
merasivninden sonra Tstanbti; Bo. 
gaziCi kopriifiijniin !ie,=iapiarinE 
ba?lamistir Dlger taraftan Dicle 
(izerinde qirkin koprtiler g5r'r"-k- 
tpu usanmi§ Irak hilkuraet; BaS- 
datta yapilacak aema koprilnun 




(JOCUKLUK VE 
GENCLlGI 

Amerikaya hicret etmig bir (jift 
<;i ailesinin ypdi i;ocu*undan birl 
olan David Steinman. Brooklyn 
kbprilsiiniin Kolgesinde fakir ve 
kdhne bir evde. biiyildU. Brook- 
lyn kopriisu 1883? te hizmete ?:r- 
mi^ti: David Ise \i(; sene sonra 
dUnyaya ^eldl fKapriller Krall(;e 
-sin di'.e ad taktifti bu vapimn 
yaninda ovnarkeii bir giin kenfii- 
Sinin de bo.le btiviik eserler th- 
parajina ahdctmlstlr Bir yandan 
taii.'5ilini (t»re derslerl veren bir li- 
.s^edo bitirirken on tif va.^mda > 
ken temin rtti^l hlr bin-sla City 
CoUeze'e oirnipye rativaffak oldu. 
Daha virmi vasma basmadan Co- 
iiiinhia (Iniversitesinde (Ic avri 
mevziida diploma alabllecek «p- 
kilde palisiyordu HOT!) da insaat 
mtihenditei olai-ak mezun nUirken 
diploma protest olarak Henry 
Hudson koprilstinun protesin' 
vapInl^tl aldigi not inn Uzeriiip 
inn dii O zaman 22 ya^mda 'di 
Otomob)!in tekamillii ile New 
York vc civarinda btiviik ve 2p- 
nl^ vollar Insasi bahis mevzuu 
olunca Henry Hudson kopriisu. 
nihavpt in§a edildi Gene miihen- 
disin diploma pro]psl virmi be.'j 
sene sonra tatbik mevkiine (ve 
avneni konulmu^tu. 



Dr. Danin B. Steinman 

Coluipbla'yi bittrdlkten sonra 
Steinman on Ikl sene kadar met- 
ro ve koprii In^aatlarinda Qaii?- 
ti Bir ara tdaho tlniverstteslnde 
ders verdi New York'takt mil^a- 
vlr miihendislerinden Giist^iv 
Llndenthafm davetine Icabet e- 
derek Hell Gate ve SciotovUle 
koprfilerinln projelerlnl'n hazirlan- 
masina vardim etti (19141 o ar- 
tik serbest hayata atilmak 'stl- 
vordu 1920 de isler kesatti A- 
merika bir huhran seclrlyordu 
Bir vazihanede ayligi 10 dolara 
bir masa ktraadi. ilk ay hie; bir 
?ey kazanmadi; tktncl ay 5 dohir. 
U(;tinca ay ise 250 dolar temln et 
tl. nihayet be?incl ay bir teSntk 
rapor hazirlad'filindan ve kirk ka- 
dar demlryolu kopriisflntln kon- 
trolunu vaptigmdan ceblne 100 
dolar girdl, 

ILK MOSABAKA . 
BiRlNClLiK 

New York llmaninda Manhat- 
tan adasini kar^i sahlle bafclivan 
Brnoklvn kopnlsUnden ba§ka 'kl 
a-sma k5prtl daha vardir WUlt- 
nmsburg ve Manhattan kQprUlerl 
Bu son ikl kfipriiytl in§a etmis o- 
lan Holton D Robinson adinda 
bir milhendis bir iriln Stelnman'a 
^plerek beraberce bir Milletlera- 
ra.si milsabakava i;;rmeertnl *ek- 
lif etti MPV7UU su Idl- Brezllva- 
da Florlanopollste bir asma kOp- 
ril protest fkl meslekdasin tekllf 
Ipri auzellik bakimindan birlnct 



se^ilmekle kalmadi fakat sym 
zamanda dlger tekliflcre -nazarBn 
dijte Iki geltk kullaniyor ve mu- 
kavemet dort mislt fazla oluyor- 
du. 

KOPRODE GQZELLiK 
VE MATEMATiK 

Bunu mateaklp senelerde 8te> 
inman'm koprtlleri Umanlsraa, 
korfezlerde. nehirler azertndo 
kendint goetermeye basladi. Sag 
lamlik kadar gilzelllk de miVhen- 
dislik yapilarinda yer almalidir. 
Dlyordu. 

Steinman matematlk(;l olarak 
asma kfipritlerin aaerodtiiamlkx 
muvazenest problemi tizertnde 
senelerce ara^tirma yapti. 1940 da 
Tacoma Narrows koprusUniin bir 
rUzgar netlceslnde yikilmasindan 
Ikt yil kadar once Steinman as- 
ma koprillerin razgarlann tesirl- 
ne kar|i iyi olmasinin leap et- 
tigini ve sallanmava mcydan ve- 
rllmemesl Igin gereken tedblrle- 
rtn alinmasinin faydali olacagini 
belirtti Mukavvadan modeller 
yaptigi glbi rtizgar temellerlnQe 
pahaliya mal olan tecriibelere gl- 
ri^tl. 

Her asma kSpra l(;in tehllkelt 
olan btr rUzgSr hizi vardir. bu 
kritik hiz normal olarak mese'.a 
saatte 30 - 50 mlllik bir hizdir 
Dr. Steinman. yol dci^emesl i!e 
kSprtlnOn kenarlari. arasmda mu 
ayyen btr mesafe birakarak kri- 
tik hizin 40 milden 600 mile 
ytikselebtlecegini Isbat etti. en 
slddetlt kasirgalarda bile saatte 
130 mill gCQmez Mackinac koprii 
sUnde daha da tlert giderek son- 
suz hizda bir rilzsAra karsi kop- 
rilnUn mukavemet edebilecei^inl 
isbat etm.:§tlr. 

Steinman'in 17 seneltk matema 
tik ara^tirmalan kopru milhen- 
disliginde vent merhaleler a(;mi^- 
tir. Elde ettigi neticeler daha ft- 
tisadl. daha emin. daha uzun. 
daha giizel koprillerin In^aeini 
mUmkiln kilmaktadir. 

Dr Steinman'in matbu eserlerl 
hakkinda bir fikir vermek ifin 
bunlarin in?a ettigt • eserlerle va 
ris ettiklerini »6ylemek k&fidlr 
Ne^riyati meyaninda asma kSp 
nilerin liesap ve Insasi. diinyanin 
meshur kopriileri. Bir koprQ In. 
5a ettim ve diger ^ttrler. glbl kt- 
taplar ve 600 e yakm tekntk ma 
kale sayilabtlir: ayrica sekiz an- 
Biklopedintn yazi heyetlnde yer 
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dir 

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bu vasiflann her btrlnl layiklyle 
haketmlstir Yazdigi ve In?a ettt-> 
gl eserlerle ve yaptigi arastirtna- 
iarla ti- ^hendlslltte ve medenlve- 
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the fiddlehead 



SPRING, 1958 NUMBER 36 



Blueprint 

He saw it clearly and clairvoyant bright: 
Twin granite pylons of majestic rise. 
Founded on rock beneath the water swirl; 
The lofty cables, spun of cold-drawn steel. 
Cutting the sky in parabolic arcs — 
A lyric pattern etched against the blue. 

The spell of Euclid sang in his design: 

The wizardry of radiating stays, 

A geometric web to hold the stars; 

The titan uplift of the singing strands; 

High Gothic portals framed in stone — all these 

He traced in blueprint, accurate as truth. 

This magic he had made, though in the end 

He did not live to see the caissons down. 

The shadow of a fear that builders know 

Was myth made real: ' A bridge demands a life.* 

He paid the toll, the world his legatee: 

His work, his dream, bridging the span of death. 

D. B. Steinman 






MIDWEST 
CHAPARRAL 

1957 

FALL— 1958— WINTER 

TIME IS A RIVER 

By D. B. Stein MAN 

Time is a river flowing relentlessly 

From iindivinable springs and chartiess source 

To final fusion in a boundless sea, 

And none can stay or speed its headlong course. 

Life is a ship afloat upon the stream 

Bearing a mortal through the instant now 

Toward bournes and aeons of the ultimate dream. 

Life is a galleon with golden prow. 

When favoring winds take up the forward slack, 
The panoramic sleight shows quickened pace; 
But when a headwind holds the journey back, 
Then time seems halted in its onward race. 
Impatient of the tide's restraining bond, 
Man's spirit soars to glimpse tlie goal beyond. 




pw™4'-"'^45"-"-"'^-l ' f ' " 



31 sf Year of Monthly Publicafion 



Science of Mind 

A Practical Guide to Fuller, Richer Living 







Volume 31, No. 7 



if ^ ii 



July, 1958 



A famous engineer and builder of bridges feels that 
the wonderful future that lies ahead for man can only 
be reached by means of a spiritual "bridge." 

for the Atomic Age 



David Barnard Steinman 




^n August 6, 1945, when the 
report of an atomic blast 
^^ over Hiroshima was flashed 
around the globe, civilization was 
shaken to its utmost foundations. 
Individual reactions varied, from 
"I am scared to death," to "Father, 
forgive them for they know not 
what they do." On the whole, 
the impact was sobering. Men 
realized that, in one brief mo- 
ment, the history of the world 
had been changed. For better or 
worse, the story of mankind has 
entered a new and fateful chap- 
ter. 




S^. \ 



Perhaps the fear and the soul- 
searching it induces are hopeful 
signs. Many more people now 
sense the need of Divine guid- 
ance, of a moral compass to steer 
by, if only because they realize 
that a single blundering act may 
prove fatal to our civilization, if 
not to the continuance of the race 
of man. 

The realization grows upon us 



0. B. St«inman it an internationally distinguished 
bridge engineer and hat been connected with the 
erection of over four hundred bridget on five con- 
tinents. He it the recipient of many honors and 
awards. Thit article it bated on hit Commencement 
Addrett at the Univertity of Tampa in June of 1957. 



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JUNE, 1958 



ARGOSY 




New four-lane bridge bisects Straits of Mackinac, is towering monument to its creators. 



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She's got a body of concrete and a crown of steel, but if you ask anybody 
in northern Michigan, he'll tell you she's the most beautiful lady in the 
Wolverine State. She ought to be ; she cost $100,000,000 and five lives 

by TED DUTTON 



The day Michigan dedicated the Mackinac Bridge, the men who built it got their 
backs up. It was the fauh of the newspapers. Editors kept calling the superlative 
handiwork of the bridge builders "a triumph of technology." Which was all right, as far 
as it went. But nobody mentioned manpower. 

This was blasphemy. There's virtually no automation in bridge-building. None is 
possible — for you don't mass-produce bridges, and no mere machine can erect spidery 
steel structures hundreds of feet in the air. Age of push buttons or no, bridges are still 
built with sweat, blood, and hand tools. Growled veterans of Mackinac, survivors of the 
hairiest industrial ordeal since the building of the Suez Canal: "Technology, hell! Don't 
them scissorbills know? Men built the Big Mack, not machines." 

At first the whole thing seemed impossible. The Big Mack spans the rough, deep, 



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Michigan In Books 
1958 




S8 



Miracle at Mackinac 



When Governor and Mrs. Williams paid the first toll and rolled across "Big Mac' 
November 1, 1957, it marked the fulfillment of a Michigan dream. 

"The Bridge can mean a new trade route, a new 'Northwest Passage,' which will 
run from one end of Michigan to the other." Covernor Williams said. 

For four years progress of the giant Mackinac Bridge made headlines. Its famous 
designer, David B. Steinman, not only wrote a poem about the great span— which he 
regards as the most imaginative and successful bridge of his career— but says of his 
experiences at Mackinac, "I have more or less set down my roots in your wonderful 
state and have established ties of brotherhood with the people of Michigan. " 

The Mackinac area has always been a favorite with vvTiters. This year three 
novelists— lola Fuller, Myron Orr and Bill Ratigan— published novels in.spired by 
its stor\'. At this moment of Michigan s great achievement, other new materials 
featuring the Bridge and its neighborhood are a valuable lead to this record of 
"Michigan in Books." 

Before the Bridge; History and Directory of St. Ignace and Nearby Lcxralities- 
Kiwanis Club, St. Ignace, Mich. 1957. $3.25. 

Brown. Prentiss. Fhc Mackinac Brids!,e Story. Wavne State University Press, 1956. 
SI. 00. 

Ciiner. Jonathan 
Years 1766, 
$8.75. 

A travel account from the British pcriiKl of Michigan's history. 

"Grand Hotel" by W. Stewart Woodfill, in Michif^an Ilistnry, December, 1957. 
Michigan 1 listorieal Commission, Lansing. 

DistinKiiisheil owner of Mackinac Island's famed Motel tells its colorful stop, at 
70th anniversar>- dinner, July 10, 1957. 



Fraveh T/iroiiy/; t!ic Interior Parts of iVort/i Ai}ierica, in the 
1767. and I76H. Reprint. Ross and Haines, Minneapolis. 1956, 



Steinman, David Barnard. Miracle Bridge at \fachjnac, in collaboration with the 
late John T. Nevill. Charcoal drawings by Reynold H. Weidenaar. Eerdmans. 
1957. $4.50. 



Michigan State Library 
1958 



Nipttt fnrfe 






OIottBtrurtiott N^ma 



Monday, July 21, 1958 



Steinman Mokes 
Grant To University 

Dr. David B. Steinman, inter- 
nationally eminent bridge engi- 
neer, has made a grant of $10.0C0 
to St. Lawrence University to es- 
tablish Holton D. Robinson Schol- 
arships for student aid, in memory 
of his late partner. Dr. Robinson, 
who was an alumnus of St. Lawr- 
ence. The partnership, which be- 
gan in 1920, lasted 25 years until 
Dr. Robinson's death in 1945 at 
the age of 82. 

The grant, made from the funds 
of the David B. Steinman Founda- 
tion, specifies that each student 
recipient of a scholarship be asked 
to assume a moral obligation to 
make repayment to the University 
when he can at any future time 
so as to help make the scholar- 
ship fund self-perpetuating. Dr. 
Steinman has specified a similar 
pledge at other institutions where 
he has established scholarships. 
The underlying thought is to in- 
culcate the spirit of giving to help 
successive generations of students. 
Dr. Steinman calls this "a moral 
chain-reaction" of obligation and 
opportunity. 






Friday Market 



October 1958 One Shilling N0.9 




D. B. steinman lui SI garden loeg ago 

I remember summer roses in a garden long ago; 
You were with me, my beloved, in the golden moonlight glow. 
A nightingale was singing in the dreamy woodland grove 
And all the longing of my heart was in his song of love: 

You are sweet, sweet, sweet, my darling. 

Oh, my love, I love you so ! 
The nightingale was singing in a garden long ago. 

I remember summer magic, all the sweetness in the air. 
The honeysuckles blending with the fragrance of your hair. 
The melody of moonlight and the starlight in your eyes 
Were mingled with the glory of the stars that filled the skies. 

You are sweet, sweet, sweet, my darling. 

Oh, my love I love you so ! 
All the stars were singing in a garden long ago. 








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VOLUME XXXII NUMBER 2 SUMMER 1958 <^ g 



Prairie Schooner 



Founded by L. C. Wimberly 



Sonnet at Seventy 



D. B. STEINMAN 

Of words, as well, your love leaves me bereft; 

Of words that strive most vainly to relate 

The wonder of that love, however deft 

At symbolizing my novitiate. 

So let my silence tell how eloquent 

The need of you, though passion be distilled 

And life no longer tempest and torment 

But sweet serenity of love fulfilled. 

Trial and loss and triumph down the years 

Have linked us by a thousand memories 

Which now, in time's decline, recalled through tears, 

Freshen, as with the blowing of a breeze. 

A day without you is denial of light: 

A pit of loneliness in starless night. 






D. B. Steinman, the famous bridge engineer, has built four hundred 
bridges on five continents, including the world's largest. He is 
the author of twenty books and six hundred professional papers 
and is the holder of nineteen honorary degrees. Poetry is a recent 
avocation, he tells us. 






Wisconsin 
Poetry Magazine 



founded 1954 



Vol. IV September — October, 1958 No. I 



FULFILLMENT 

(John A. Roebling, 1 869) 



1 



y fevered travail he had wrung from fate 
This chance for which he hungered, to create 
Of lasting stone and steel, of strands and beams, 
In vaulting majesty, his bridge of dreams. 



He saw it clearly in clairvoyant view: 
Rising from firm foundations anchored deep, 
The granite pylons bold against the blue; 
The mighty cables curved in downward sweep 
And upward in the arc of perfect law; 
The magic pattern of the stays and bars, 
A giant wch to hold the journeying stars; 
A bolder span than mortal ever saw. 
Speeding the multitudes in surging flow 
Like human tides across the shores below. 



But he, whose heart and mind conceived the plan 

W.is not to see the time-dctying towers, 

The cables' uplift with titanic powers. 

The thankful thousands on the far-flung span. 

From ancient times a fearsome legend broods: 

■"A bridge demands a life!" A sacrifice 

To angry river gods who gu:ird the floods. 

And here the forfeit was a cruel toll: 

At very threshliold of his promised goal. 

By mortal hurt the builder paid the price. 

The m.ui inspired with pa~sinn to be free, 

Who bravely lied oppression's iron hand 

And found .i haven here to build his dream. 

Who saw the poetry in sea and sky, 

In star and sunset, and in mountain stream, 

Who-e love tor music s.uig in his design. 

Whose love of beauty glowed in every line — 

Repaid his debt to his adopted land. 

With final breath he left his Icg.icy: 

"The Bridge! How beautiful the Bridge will be!" 

— David B. Stcmman 






He's the News 



s 



D. B. Sfeinman Decided 
Hk Bridge Career When 7 



When David Barnard Stein- 
man was 7 and hawking news- 
papers in ths shadow of the 
10-year-old B.rookiyn Bridge, he 
told his chums, that someday 
he'd build a bridge like that— 
and they laughed. 

Tod^y, 65 years later, he has 
: had the last laugh 440 times 
■* • • 




DAVID B. STEINMAN 

* • * 
over — ones for each of the 
bridges he has built — and is 
still laughing. 

— o — 

WHAT'S MORE, the very 
bridge which inspired him now 
bears a bronze plaque com- 
memorating his reconstruction 
ar>d strengthening of the span 
foi modern traffic from 1948 to 
1953. 

Also ks may have another 
laugh in store in the survey of 
the feasibility of the proposed 
Liberty Bridge from Jersey 
City to Brooklyn, which he is 
about to undertake for Hudson 
and Union Counties. 

For the projscted Narrows 



Bridge from Brooklyn to Staten 
Island which Liberty Bridge 
supporters oppose was called 
■The Liberty Bridge" by Stein- : 
man when he first began plan- ; 
iiing it in 1925. j. 

— 0— 

STE1NIVI.\N said he even 
made the presentation before 
the War Department 10 years 
ago to get permission to con- 
struct the span, and then New 
York City's Robsrt Moses— who 
preferred the Narrows Bridge 
name— "gave the job to some- 
one else." 

Projects currently under con- 
struction by Steinman are a -^ 
bridge over the Tigris River in ;;; 
Baghdad, Iraq, and another 'j 
over the Bosporus between jj 
European and Asiatic Turkey. ;'j 

Bridges on five continents f; 
b2ar the iniprint of the 5-foot-8 "s 
inch Steinman, who bosses 350 ;] 
engineers on the 10th and llth "i 
floor offices of his firm at 117 ;\| 
Liberty St., in Manhattan. The W 
walls of the executive offices ;| 
are coversd with medals, ■% 
plaques and scrolls honoring ;| 
his contributions. j| 

ENGINEERING bibliogra- ':| 

phies list his as the author of :] 
20 books and 600 professional I" 
papers. Since his graduation ■ ; 
summa cum laude in 1906 from , 
New York's City College and ;J 
award of his Masters in 1909 :::;i 
and Ph.D. in J911 at Colurfibia ;| 
University, he has taught and ;:;: 
built uninterruptedly. 

"Wlio's Who" notes he was | 
born in New York City June ;| 
11, 1886, the son of factory la- | 
borer Louis Kelvin and Eva | 
ScoUard Steinman, It records f 
his marriage June 9, 1915, to :l 
Irene Hoffman who livss with i 
him at 305 Riverside Dr., New | 
York City, and still accora- y 
panics him abroad on jobs. | 



Jersey Journal, Jersey City, Wed.. Aug. 20. 1958 




"f C 1 2 1958 




PONTES DE GRANDES VAOS 



D. B. STEINMAN 

Engenheiro Consultor 
Traducao de Amalia Machadu da Costa 



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MICHIGAN ARCHITECT 
*AND ENGINEER 



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ELECTRO NEWS of MICHIGAN 



JUNE 
1958 




DR. DAVID B. STEINMAN 



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An Engineered 




LOOKING TO THE NORTH ACROSS 
THE BIG BRIDGE 



OUR 40TH YEAR 






WRITER'S 
NOTES & QUOTES 



/ 



EARTHBOUND 

--D. B. Steinman 



Bards who pen verses more shocking than lyrical, 
Why flaunt yoiir rejection of powers iinknown? 
Belying the mystery, denying the miracle 
Of life transcending the flesh and hone. 

Lit from afar and within by the noimienal. 
Glimpsing the wings of the wise and victorious. 
Yet fettered by gyves of the merely phenomenal, 
You grovel on earth, abject and inglorious. 



June 1958 



1iaferf0mti 



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WATERTOWN, N. Y^ WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, JULY 16, 1958 



$10,000 Scholarship 
Fund Given S. L. U. 

Canton. July 16. — Dr. David Stcinman has repaid tliosc debts 
B. Stcinman, internationally cmi- a hundrediold and, in addition, 
nent bridge engineer, ha.s made ha.s made grants to a long string 
a grant of $10,000 to St. Law- of educational in.^tilutions. Some 
rence university to establish Hoi- of these scholarship funds he has 
ton D. Robinson scholarships for established in honor of friends 
student aid in memory of his late and loved ones. At Manhattan 
partner, Dr. Robinson who was an college he established the Ar- 
1886 graduate of St. Lawrence thur V. Sheridan Scholarship 
The partnership, which began in fund in memory of Dr. Sheridan. 
1920, lasted 25 years until Dr. a friend and co-worker in pro- 
Robin.son's death in 1945 at the tessional causes. At Hunter col- 
age of 82. lege, he establislTcd the Irene H. 

The grant, made I rum the Steinman Scholarship fund in 
funds of David B. Steinman honor of his wife. At the Uni- 
foundation, specifies that each versity of Florida, an Irene H. 
student recipient of a scholar- Steinman fund has been e.'-tab- 
ship be asked to assume a moral lishde for student aid. To date, 
obligation to make repayment to Dr. Setinman has made grants 
the university when he can at to more than 30 educational in- 
any future time so as to help slitutions, in an aggregate 
make the scholarship fund self- amount exceeding $400,000. 
perpetuating. Dr. Steinman has Last year Dr. Steinmiin made' 
specified a similar pledge at a grant of $1,500 to St. Law- 
other institutions where he has rence university to finance the 
established scholarships. The David B. Steinman Festival of 
underlying thought is to incul- the Arts. He has agreed to pro- 
cate the spirit of giving to help vide funds for a similar program 
successive generations of slu- during the 1958-59 school year, 
dents. Dr. Steinman calls this Dr. Stcinman was honored by 
"a moral chain-reaction'' of the university at the spring 
obligation and opportunity. commencement June 8, at which 

Recalling his lif'"-long indcbl- time he v.-as awarded an hon- 
edness for scholarships and Icl- orary doctor of humane letters 
lowships that made his own pro- degree for his contribution to 
fessional education possible. Dr. the humanities. 







Dr. Steinman's most recent achievement: the mighty 
Mackinac Bridge in Michigan. Here were erected 552- 
foot towers which reach down into gorges 210 feet 
below the water and which stand 3,800 feet apart. 
And here 42,000 miles of wire were strung to form 
the cables from which hangs the 6,600-ton roadway. 



A self-anchored suspension bridge, proposed by Dr. 
Steinman, for spanning the Tigris River in Baghdad, 
Iraq, has been selected by the Ministry of Develop- 
ment from comparative designs of five different types 
of structure submitted by Dr. Steinman in his pre- 
liminary report. The selection of the suspension design, 
shown below, was based on its inherent grace and 
beauty at a location near the King's Palace where 
maximum aesthetic appearance was the governing 
consideration. 




Horizons 



in 
Engineering 

By 

DR. DAVID B. STEINMAN, P. E., 

Consiiltint; Enfiineer and First President, National Society 
of Professional Eni^ineers 



HORIZONS are not boundaries. The future of engi- 
neering is unbounded. There is no limit to future 
progress and achievement. 

The horizon is merely the line of tangency circumscrib- 
ing that which is immediately visible. There are always 
much vaster areas beyond the horizon. The opportunities 
for future discoveries and inventions are unlimited. 

The one assured fact is that horizons are ever e.xpanding. 
As we scale new heights, new and greater horizons come 
into view. 

When we stand on the seashore, our horizon is a circle 
of three miles radius. When we ascend to the top of the 
Empire State Building, our horizon is enlarged to a radius 
of forty-one miles. The area of our field of view is in- 
creased two-hundred-fold. 

Our one lesson from past experience is never to under- 
estimate the future of engineering progress. Each new 
discovery opens tremendous vistas of further invention and 
application. The quickening tempo is logarithmic. Each 
new generation, building on the past, sees more progress 
in science and engineering than was recorded in all the 
preceding centuries. 

Before the dawn of history, the greatest engineering 
achievement was the invention and application of the 
wheel. This was man"s first great improvement upon nature 
The prehistoric genius who hit upon this apparently simple 
invention could not have visualized the vast future signifi- 
cance, the amazing vistas of mechanical progress thereby 
made possible. Hardly any subsequent engineering advance 
would have been possible without the wheel in its mani- 
fold developments, symbolized by all the indispensable 
wheels of industry, transportation, and power. One inven- 
tion led to millions of others. If all the wheels used, con- 
sciously or unconsciously, in our dailv lives were suddenly 
annihilated, our civilization uould collapse. 

Despite occasional myopic prophets who discounted 






<vD 



Mackinac Bridge Stamp Is 
Dedicated On Island Today 



Postmaster General Arthur E. 
Summerfield was the principal 
speaker today in exercises held 
at noon in Marquette Park, MacK- 
inac Island, dedicating the new 
Mackinac Bridge commemorative 
postage stamp. 

The Mackinac Bridge stamp was 
to be available only in St. Ignace 
and Mackinaw City today, and 
Thursday it is to be sold at all of 
the nation's 36,605 post offices. 

Provisions were made for the 
visitors to the Mackinac Straits 
area on June 25 to obtain the new 
stamp at tat high schools in St. 
Ignace and Mackinaw City, and at 
a postal station in the Grand Hotel 
on Mackinac Island. 

This special First-day canceDa- 
tion is unique, in that the post- 
mark from both St. Ignace and 
Mackinaw City Post Offices reads 
"Mackinac Bridge, Michigan," and 
it is the first time the Post Office 
Department has authorized an 
identical first-day of issue post- 
mark for use in two cities. 
• * * 

At a luncheon held after the 
noon ceremonies, the Postmaster 
General presented autographed al- 
bums of the new stamp to design- 
er, David B. Steinman, and to 
Arnold J. Copeland, the artist who 
designed the stamp. 

Summerfield told his audience:- 

"From that day in 1634. when 
Jean Nicolet paddled his canoe to 
Mackinac Island Harbor, in his 
search for the coast of China, till 
today, when we honor Mackinac 
Island with this commemorative 
stamp ceremony, this beautiful 
island has always symbolized 
Michigan history to all Americans. 



* * * 

"The prediction of William Cul- 
len Bryant, who visited Mackinac 
Ti-land in 1846, as the Island's fur 
industry ceased. "Your manifest 
fate will now be the tourist busi- 
ness" is doubly assured by this 
bridge which will bring added mil- 
lions of tourists to the now united 
State of Michigan. 

"The postage stamps of our na- 
tion are a living record of the his- 
tory of our people. 

"It will very well be that future 



historians will include this newest 
marvel of engineering, the Mack- 
inac Bridge, in this proud cate- 
gory of mankind's outstanding ac- 
complishments when the story of 
our Twentieth Century is finally 
written, in terms of our great pub- 
lic works. 

* * • 

"How will the historian of the 
future interpret this Mackinac 
Bridge? What will it mean to him? 
What will it tell him about the 
United States and the people '>f 
Michigan and their life and works 
during this dynamic period of our 
hi.'itory? 

"I believe, it would tell him here 
is further proof that we were a 
peaceful people, intelligent and 
progressive; that we were a 
travelling people — nearly all of 
us automobile owners — anxious to 
visit our neighbors in Canada and 
throughout Michigan and the Unit- 
ed States; that we disliked having 
any of our own people in Michigan 
isolated by water or any other 
natural barriers. 



"In the very best sense thi^ 
bridge truly is an architectural 
iriumph of the greatest magnitude, 
worthy to take its place beside the 
Panama Canal, the Hoover Dam, 
and the Golden Gate Bridge, which 
already have become landmarks 
in the history of our times. 

"For 75 years and perhaps even 
longer farsighted and determined 
Americans dreamed about a Mack- 
inac Straits Bridge that would be 
a powerful stimulus to commerce 
and agriculture and provide an 
open door for all Americans to vis- 
it Michigan's magnificent Water 
Wonderland. 

"As far back as 1884 William 
Saulson and others were dreaming 
of bridging this famed and historic 
Mackinac Straits to provide an 
all-season safe and dependable 
passage and open up a new era for 
Michigan and its people. 

"Studies were made in 1920, in 
1935, and again in 1940. 

"Then World War II intervened 
and the planning was temporarily 
halted. 

"In 1950 the Legislature led by 
Speaker of the House Victor A, 



Knox, now a Congressman, creat- 
ed a new Bridge Authority and 
appropriated $100,000 to cover its 
expenses of studying the feasibility 
"In 1953 the 8-member Adminis- 
xvative Board of Michigan unani- 
mously approved the bond issue to 
build the bridge which had been 
authorized by a more than two- 
thirds majority of both Houses of 
the Michigan Legislature. 

"Great tribute is due David B. 
Steinman who designed this long- 
est, most costly suspension bridge 
ever known to mankind, which we 
proudly call the "World's Great- 
est Bridge." He has served as 
designing or consulting engineer 
in the construction of more than 
400 bridges on five continents, with 
eight of them winning awards as 
the most beautiful in America. 
"Tomorrow's historian will un- 
doubtedly note the precise and 
expertly planned time-table for 
this 8100,000,000 structure. Ground 
was broken May 7 and 8 in 1954, 
and the bridge was opened to traf- 
fic Nov. 1, 1957 — on exactly ths 
day scheduled four years earlier. 
This is certainly a great tribute to 
the Mackinac Bridge Authority 
and the engineering and construc- 
tion firms which completed this 
magnificent bridge exactly on 
time. 

"The bridge is related to an- 
other development having tre- 
mendous significance, the St. 
Lawrence Seaway, which is sched- 
uled for completion next year. 
Ships from all parts of the world 
then will become visitors to tlie 
Great Lakes and to lake ports of 
this country and those of Canada. 
The importance of this project on 
the economy of the United States 
and of Canada will be of great 
assistance to both nations as well 
as to the world. 

"Directly related to the benefits 
of the St. Lawrence Seaway will 
be those of the Mackinac Bridge 
in its role as an important artery 
between the lands bordering the 
Great Lakes and the rest of the 
world. 

"The Mackinac Bridge com- 
memorative U. S. stamp which we 
now dedicate will carry the same 
message to all the peoples of to- 
day's world." 



DAILY PRESS 



MICHIGAN'S MIRACLE BRIDGE 



In humility and reverence 

we dedicate this woric of faith. 

And with pride we behold what 

vision, courage and determination 

have wrought. 

(^ 

A poem in steel. 

A dream-span on bed-rock. 

A symphony in metal and stone. 

The mystical union of beauty and 

strength. 

A lyric pattern etched 

against the blue. 

God working through man to confute 

the powers of evil and to add another 

stanza to the hymn of creation. 

(^ 

This is the Song of the Bridge: 

With hammer-clang on«teel and rock. 

I sing the son^W>f men who build. 

With strength defying storm 

and 'shock, 

I sing a hymn of dreams fulfilled. 

I lift my span, I fling it wide, 

And stand where wind and 

wave contend. 

I bear the load so men may ride 

Whither they will, and to what end. 

The light gleams on my 

strands and bars 

In glory when the sun goes -down. 

I spread a net to hold the stars 
And wear i^ sunset as my crown. 

(^ 

With humble pride dnd wonder, we 

look up to gaze upon the .^idge. 

Outsoaring gravity' and tpace, il 

rises from the waVes on shining 

strands to arch across the sky 

in lofty grace. 
Seen from above, a battleship 
appears dwarfed like a toy beneath 

the vaulting span. 

This is our triumph over ancient fears. 

A Bridge of Peace, 

v^ought of the dreams of man! 

Before it was built, 

we envisioned the Bridge.;. 

We saw it clearly and 

clairvoyant bright: 

Twin sky-piercing towers 

of majestic rise. 

The power-packed cables in 

symmetry of parabolic arcs. 

The lifan uplift of the singing strands. 

The lofty roadway bearing multitudes 

high above the >Araves. 

And deep beneath the waves and 

tides, the massive caissons founded 

upon bed-rock, enduring as 

the pyramids. 



by D. B. STEINMAN, 

Consulting Engineer 



/. 






\ 




There is timeless strength in those 

towers and poetry in the cable-borne 

span. The two ore 

harmoniously joined. 

Between the two pierced $teel 

towers, framing the azure of the 

sky, the arching roadway slowly 

sweeps upward to meet the swift 

downward sweep of the cables. 

These curves and proportions 

were not accidents. 



It is no accident that the Mackinac 

Bridge is a thrill to the beholder, 

to lift the heart with pride and 

the soul with thankful prayer. 

It >A'as planned that v/ay. 

A lifetime of dedicated purpose, 

long years of consecrated effort, 

the highest yearnings of the human 

soul, went into the planning and 

building of this mosterwork. 



85,000 Blueprints. ^*B 

A minion tons of concrete and steel. 

Twenty-million man-hours of 

sweat and toil and courage 

and sacrifice. 

But, above all these, the 

priceless ingredient — 

the Si^rit of Consecration. 

And that includes the qualities 

of vision, devotion, inspiration 

and integrity. 

(^ 

That If why the Mackinac Bridge 

will endure. 
That is why the Mackinac Bridge 

is majestic. 
And that is why the Mackinac Bridge 

is beautiful. 

(^ 

In the planning and building of 

Michigan's Miracle Bridge, no effort 

was spared, nothing was stinted. 

The highest attainments of the 
science and art of bridgebuilding 

went into the design. 

The best qualities of materials and 

workmanship went into the 

construction. 

The finest qualities of honor and 

loyally and teamwork went Into 

the consummation of this 

great project. 

(^ 

These are eternal verities: 

There is no excellence without effort. 

There is no achievement 

without vision. 

There is no consummation 

without faith. 

(^ 

The Mackinac Bridge is a triumph of 

science and art. 

But, more than that, 

the Mackinac Bridge is a monument 

— an enduring monument to virion, 

faith, and courage. 

Without the vision, faith, and courage 

of the people of Michigan — 

their leaders, their statesmen, 

their workers — this great Bridge 

could never have been built. 

^^ 

This is the heroic saga 

of the Mackinac Bridge: 

Generations dreamed the crossing; 

Doubters shook their heads in scorn. 

Brave men vowed that 

they would build it — 

From their faith the Bridge was born. 

There it spans the miles of water. 

Speeding millions on their way — 

Bridge of vision, hope, and courage. 

Portal to a brighter day. 

— D. B. Steinman 



OFFICIAL 
MACKINAC BRIDGE SOUVENIR BOOK 
Dedication Festival June 26th, 27th, 28th, 1958 



X- TC^N^o 



Newsweek 



."^fe 




MAY 12, 1958 



-ART 



Magic in Stone and Steel 

"We live with the structures we build. 
Our works become a part of the land- 
scape, to mar or to grace. If we are to be 
true to our trust, each structure we raise 
and each span we build must be a 
thing of inspiration. No one, unless he 
is completely without feeling, can re- 
main unmoved at the sight of a beauti- 
ful bridge. A bridge is more than a thing 
of steel and stone; it is the fulfillment 
of human dreams to link together 
distant places." 

For Dr. David B. Steinman, the great 
bridge builder of our time who wrote 
these lines, the most beautiful structure 
in the world is the Brooklyn Bridge, 
which was opened just 75 years ago last 
week and which he modernized 
(1950-52). From the moment that it 
first soared through space, the bridge 
has not only stirred the citizens of New 
York with its magical lines, but has 
inspired a host of artists to capture the 
essence of its beauty. How they suc- 
ceeded can be seen in the Brooklyn 
Museum's current show of paintings and 
drawings, augmented by photographs 
and by blueprints drawn by the bridge's 
engineer, John A. Roebling. 

As Dr. Steinman, who also wrote the 
foreword to the show's catalogue, makes 
clear, the visual fascination of the Brook- 
lyn Bridge lies in the contrast between 
"time-defying" massiveness of the Gothic 
towers, "the vast sweep of the mighty 
cables," and the incredibly delicate web 
of stays which radiate from them. "The 
Brooklyn Bridge still remains the most 
esthetically satisfying of all great bridges 
because its builders were artists at heart. 
Of granite and steel and dreams^ the 
bridge was built." 




Steinman: 'Brooklyn Bridge builders were artists at heart' 



Inspiration: Steinman should know. 
Now 71, he has designed some 400 spans 
throughout the world, including the 5- 
mile-long Mackinac Bridge in Michigan 
which became the world's longest (from 
anchorage to anchorage) when it opened 
last November. Six of his airy bridges 
have won awards as being among the 
nation's most beautiful. Technically, he 
has been a pioneer in the application of 
aerodynamics to the design of bridges 
(he was the first to explain the enig- 
matic collapse of the Tacoma Narrows 
Bridge in 1940 as due to the wind). 

But however far Steinman's engi- 
neering and esthetic vision seems to 
have moved, his inspiration, he has al- 
ways maintained, is still the Brooklyn 
Bridge under whose Gothic shadow he 
was raised on New York City's Lower 
East Side. His love of this bridge is 
overwhelming. Paintings and etchings of 
the span crowd the walls of his office 
and his Miami Beach and New York 
homes; a picture of the bridge appears 
on his Christmas cards. 

Speaking of his first love, Steinman 
said: "It is the first suspension bridge 
built with steel cables and steel trusses. 



Its story is one of the great dramas of our 
age. When I came to modernize it I 
avoided anything that would change its 
appearance. I wanted to preserve the 
things that had nostalgic value. For in- 
stance, I retained the wooden prome- 
nade, even though some officials wanted 
to take it down. I also kept the old 
gooseneck lights— we don't use arc lights 
any more but we have the fixtures." 

No Ciiange: This passion to retain 
an aura of the past is unusual for 
Steinman since he has been so daring in 
building new bridges and in pioneering 
in the use of paint and light to em- 
phasize the beauty of a bridge's lines. 

"I got tired of seeing bridges painted 
black or battleship gray," he explained. 
"I thought bridges should have a little 
warmth, something to tie them in with 
their setting. First I used slight tints of 
green, but then I grew bolder." With 
the Mackinac, Steinman became auda- 
cious enough to paint the towers ivory 
and the span a "foliage" green. 

As for putting a vivid coat of paint 
on the Brookly Bridge, however, 
David Steinman admits frankly: "I never 
considered it." 



u^li 



V ►J 






BOOK CORNER' 



In 1938, David B. Steinman, the 
world's foremost bridge designer 
and engineer was pronounced mad 
by some members of his profession 
when he argued that bridges 
should by rigid, not flexible. 
"Build a bridge too flexible," he 
stated, "and it will oscillate itself 
right out of the picture." 

Bridges have a critical wind 
velocity, which means a bridge 
with a low critical wind velocity, 
like the Bronx-Whitestone will 
start swaying in a thirty-mile-an- 
hour wind. Dr. Steinman insisted 
that bridges built on a rigid prin- 
ciple could and would have a 
critical wind velocity up to infin- 
ity. 

WHEN THE first Tacoma Nar- 
rows Bridge, the third longest in 
the world gained the name 'Gal- 
loping Gertie " from the citizens 
of Tacoma ar.d then collapsed in 
a mild gale in 1840, some engineers 
stopped questioning Dr. Steinmans 



sanity. Working out his revolu- 
tionary priiicitilcs. Dr. Steinman 
completed " liit 5-mi;;^ Irr.p Mack- 
inac Straiis Bridge, longest in the 
world, at a cost of $100,000,000 
'$35,000,000 lees than estimated). 
As Dr. Steinman explained it, the 
rigid design used in this bridge 
not only raised its critical wind 
velocity to infinity, but. "utilized 
the wind to make it stable. The 
stronger the wind the niore stable 
the bridge. " "It's been checked by 
engineers who opposed me, who 
said I was crazy." 

The story of the Mackinac 
Straits Bridge and Tacomas "Gal- 
loping Gertie" Bridge, as well as 
a history of bridge building is con- 
tained in "Bridges and their Build- 
ers" by Dr. Steinman and Sara 
Ruth 'Watson, just republished by 
Dover iJan. 23, $1.95). It is a part 
of Dover's science series which 
hopes to stimulate the interest of 
the general public and of students 
in science and engineering. 



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Monday, February 3, 1958 



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THE AUSTRALASIAN ^^^ " 

ENGINEER 




MICHIGAN'S DREAM BRIDGE COMES TRUE 
This Is proudly acclaimed as the world's longest suspension bridge — 8614 ft., including anchorages. With the approach spans 
it totals 17,913 ft. The 3800 ft. suspension span is second only to the Golden Gate Bridge (4200 ft.), San Francisco, but the 
use of five cable spans with rennote anchorages makes it actually the longest bridge. Outstanding in their magnitude are 
the tower foundations, which are founded on rock 210 ft. below water, and involved the placing of 500,000 cubic yards of 
concrete. A total of 55,000 tons of structural steel, 11,100 tons of wire (41,000 miles of 3/16 inch diameter) were used. 
RIGHT: Designer, David B. Steinman, stands against the back- drop of his bridge, viewing his handiwork — and another job 

w«l| don*». 



BOOK REVIEW 

"MIRACLE BRIDGE 
AT MACKINAC 

By DAVID B. STEINMAN 
[In collaboration with John T. Nevill. 
Produced by Wm. B. Eerdmans Pub- 
lishing Co., Grand Rapid.s, Michigan. 
Price, 4. .10 dollars (U.S.A.) ] 

An epoch-making event took place 
on 1st November, 1957, with the 
opening of the spectacular engineering 
feat — the iA. 45,000. 000 bridge across 
the Straits of Mackinac. The town of 
St. Ignace. on the north, and Mac- 
kinaw City, on the south, were linked 
by a permanent roadway. 

The State of Michigan, U.S.A., is 
divided in its 59.000 square miles of 
territory by the waters of the Great 
Lake. Michigan, and the turbulent 
Straits of Mackinac. The only access 
acro.ss this four-mile passage has been 
by ferry. 

The 17,000 square miles to the 
north was alien land as far as the 
people in Southern Michigan were 
economically or commercially con- 
cerned. 

For over seventy years a bridge was 
talked of and dreamed about. The 
oldest territory, t h e birthplace of 
American history, as far we.st as the 
Mississippi, with its ancient town of 
St. Ignace. has been socially and 
geographically isolated since its estab- 
lishment. 

When possible, a small steamboat 
chugged across the swift-llowing 
waters. In winter, a treacherous ice 
bridge, quite unreliable, filled the gap, 
and while providing a hazardous pas- 
sage, it proved too often to be respon- 
sible for great loss of life. 



While men talked and wondered 
whether a bridge would ever be built, 
stalwart enthusiasts pegged away; and 
while projects were put up and as 
often rejected, pigeon-holed by red- 
tape or held over by lack of funds, 
the die-hards were thrown a sop in 
195 2 by a resplendent £A 2. 000, 000. 
10,000-h.p. vehicular ferry, '-Vocation- 
land.'" 

To the bridge advocates, however, 
this was just another hurdle in their 
course. 

Meanwhile, the Mackinac Bridge 
Authority, which was first established 
in 1934, kept up the a.ssault on the 
Legislature and finally had .success in 
permission to issue bonds. This was 
done with the proviso that if the bonds 
were not taken up by December, 
1953, the appropriation would be can- 
celled—and with the unexpressed wish 
that this would not be done. 

So enters a new era. The bonds 
were sold and engineers and ci^instruc- 
tors moved in on the binlding of the 
bridee. and completed their work on 
1st November. 1957. 

It is not o"r work in this review to 
retell the whole story of this mag- 
nificent proiect. This is given by the 
authors of tKis book, with al' the hopes 
and fears, all the trials and emer- 
gencies that faced the intrepid men 
who. under the guidance of David B. 
Steinman, built this miracle bridge at 
Mackinac. 

Many progress accounts of this 
work, with illustrations of it in many 
stages, have been given in newspapers 
and technical journals, but the hi.story, 
as written by the designer — the man 



who was responsible for the perfor- 
mance of the work — must be read by 
those who appreciate the merits of 
achievement. 

Such a work could only be done by 
teamwork. It involves many individuals 
whose skills and edurance brought this 
dream bridge to reality. They and the 
engineering organisations concerned 
must receive due credit. This is given 
in the book by the author. 

"To-day," as Governor G. Menncn 
Williams (Michigan State) writes in 
his foreword to the book, "Mackinac 
Bridge stands as a symbol of the spirit 
of Michigan-a spirit which has never 
found any job too big. if the job 
needed to be done." 

The author, David B. Steinman. is 
this century's most rent)wned bridge 
designer. He needs no introduction 
to readers. In his spectacular career, 
involving the building of nearly 400 
bridges in five continents, he has built 
structures which have received wide 
publicitv. He has received sixty-seven 
recognitions, honours and awards for 
his work by governments concerned 
and his fellow-engineers. 

Co-author, John T. Nevill, a veteran 
newsman who resided in the territory 
of Michigan, was so taken with its 
inspiration that he contributed many 
articles to American publications. He 
■ n collaboration with Steinman. useJ 
his skill in telling this story in his mo't 
fraphic manner. Regrettably, just be- 
fore it WIS completed, he met a tragic 
death when his house was burned 
down. 

This book is recommended for quiet 
reading and enjoyment as a story of 
outstanding achievement. 



FEBRUARY 7. 1958 






3unMn 3lantlartl-iimes 



NEW BEDFORD, MASS., MARCH 9, 1958 



Glory of Bridges, Builders 
Sings Through New Book 



BRIDGES AND THEIR BIH.DERS 

David B. Steinman and Sarah Ruth Watson 
Dover 

If to know a man"s work is to 
know him, many Greater New 
Bedford residents know Mr. Dav- 
id B. Steinman: He is the design- 
er of Rhode Island's Mt. Hope 
Bridge. He 'is also an unusual 
blend of designer, engineer and 
artist, a man who is fully, sensi- 
tively and richly aware of the 
symbolism of a bridge. In this 
book, he and Miss Watson write 
of bridges as art-lovers and au- 
thorities writp of great paint- 
ings. Tlie result is a strikingly 
vital and entertaining book tha't 
will infect the least - technical - 
minded general reader with Dr. 
Steinman's own enthusiasm. 

Many illustrations of famed 
bridges around the world, old and 
new, are included in this book 
including one of Dr. Steinman's 
newest designs, the great Macki- 
nac suspension bridge joining 
Upper and Lower Michigan and 
just recently opened. Rook is a 
history of bridge-building from 
prehistoric days and a useful 
reference in addition to its many 
other merits. 






Wisconsin 
Poetry Magazine 



Founded 1954 



Vol. Ill March - April, 1958 No. IV 



FOR A COLLEGE PRESIDENT 

15 y tens of thousands, eager, hungry youth 

They throng to slake their burning thirst for truth; 

And here you greet them as a guide and friend 

To spark the things of spirit that transcend 

The shibboleths of ancestry and creed. 

The noble word made nobler by the deed, 

You move young hearts to join with one another 

In warmth for you as for an older brother. 

Free from pretense or tinge of vanity. 

Your lamp is love for all humanity. 

— David B. Steinman 



"In all creative work whenever we are helping to make life more beautiful 
and uplifting, there is a feeling that we are working in partnership with 
the divine." — David B. Steinman 







Pe/iAoaoJulxeA' 



U.S.A. 



IF A BOY LIKES adventure, he should 
consider the hfe of a bridge 
builder. Every bridge gives engineers 
some new problems to work out. In 
N. E. we still have the covered 
wooden bridges which were built a 
century ago. There are movable 
bridges, bascule bridges which are 
divided in the middle and tilt like 
the blades of a jack-knife; in others 
a central span turns on a pivot, or is 
lifted up on the sides of towers. The 
"pontoon" bridge, floating on boats 
built for temporary use, particularly 
by armies, are also permanent struc- 
tures. There are arches, trusses and 
girder bridges, but for spanning the 
greatest distances, the suspension 
bridge is champion. John A. Roebling 
spent a lifetime convincing people of 
this. When New York City and 
Brooklyn decided to have a bridge 
over the Elast River uniting them, 
Roebling persuaded them to try his 
suspension idea. He died before it 
was finished and for over half a cen- 
tury the mighty bridge carried an 
endless stream of heavy traffic. In 
1950 reconstruction was begun to 
modernize it. 



Our personality for this month is 
David S. Steinman, an internation- 
ally distinguished bridge engineer 
whose office is in the Roebling Build- 
ing in N.Y.C., who received a civic 
medal for his work on the reconstruc- 
tion of the Brooklyn Bridge. Since 
1920 Dr. Steinman, who received his 
Ph.D. at Columbia University, has 
served as designing or consulting en- 
gineer in the construction of nearly 
400 bridges on five continents. He is 
presently engaged on the world's 
largest bridge project: the $100,000,- 
000 Straits of Mackinac Bridge be- 
tween the peninsulas of Michigan 
which will have the world's second 
longest main span. (The San Fran- 
cisco-Oakland bridge is the world's 
longest bridge.) 

When people told the engineer that 
his bridges were poetry, he wrote: 

The Bridge at Mackinac 

In the land of Hiawatha 

Where the white man gazed 
with awe 
At a paradise divided 

By the Straits of Mackinaw 



8 



I 



ANNALS OF tHE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ' . 7 ' 

I ' '^ 

Volume 79, Art. 4, Pages 109-142 



Septeiftber 16, 1959 



Otto v. St..Whitelock 

Managing Editor Associate Editor 

Franklin N. Furness Philip Ressner 



MODES AND NATURAL FREQUENCIES OF 
SUSPENSION-BRIDGE OSCILLATIONS 

By 

D. B. Steinman 

Conaulting Engineer 
New York, N. Y. 




lan 



NEW YORK 
PUBUSHED BY THE ACADEMY 



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ajBlfe'lJ^morral 



Samstag, den 22. August 1959 



Natur und Technik 

**Brucken fur die Ewigkeit" 



Das Leben Johann Roeblings and seines Sohiies 



Ala eln "Gedlcht aus Granit 
-und Stahl" spannt sich die 
Brooklyner Briicke, das Melster- 
Btiick dee deutschblutigen Archi- 
tekten Johann Roebling und 
eeines Sohnes Washington, zwi- 
schen Manhattan und Brooklyn 
liber den East River. D. B. 
Steinmann setzt in seinem nun- 
mehr deutsch erschiexienen, 
liberaus lebendig geschriebenen 
Romaji "Briicken fiir die Ewig- 
keit"») (OriginalUtel "The Build- 
ers of the Bridge", von Walther 
Schwerdtfeger vorzUglich tiber- 
setzt) zwei genialen deutsch- 
stS.ininigen Ingenieuren, dem 
aus ThUringen gebiirtlgen Jo- 
hann Roebling und seinem Sohn 
Washington, ein wiirdiges Denk- 
mal. Alls dem "schlafrigen Nest" 
Miihlhausen, wo er am 12. Juni 
180€ geboren wurde, erwarb Jo- 
hann, der sich friih, als Gym- 
nasiast, in der Mathematik aus- 
zelchnete, mlt vierzehn Jahren 
ein Zeugnis als "Baumelster". 
Er tat sich auch im klassischen 
Zeichnen und Architekturzeich- 
nen hervor. Mit Staunen erfahrt 
man aus der fesselnden Biogra- 
phie Johann Roeblings, daB der 
Bpater weltberiihmte Architekt 
niemals die Reifepriifung abge- 
le«t hat, weil es ihm an Be- 
gabung fUr die klassischen Bil- 
dungsfacher mangelte. Er wech- 
selte nach Erfurt iiber und stu- 
dierte dort bei dem gefeierten 
Mathematiker Unger. 



•) D. B. Steinman: Briicken fUr die 
Ewlgkeit. Da.s Leben von Johann Roeb- 
ling und seinem Sohn. Im Werner- 
Vulag GmbH. DuEseldorf. 



Am 11. Mai 1831 reiste Roeb- 
ling mit einer kleinen Gruppe 
von Pionieren nach Bremen ab, 
um al& freiheitlich Denkender 
vorwlegend aus politischen Griin- 
den der Heimat den Riieken zu 
kehren und nach Amerika aus- 
zuwandern. In Deutschland 
herrschten politische Wirren. 

Der Autor schildert, wie un- 
endllch viele Schwierigkeiten 
Roebling aus dem Wage raumen 
muBte, bis er nach dem Bau 
einer Hangebriicke iiber den 
Niagarafall und uber den Ohio 
bei Cincinnati darangehen 
konnte, sein IJebenswerk zu 
entwerf en : die Hangebriicke 
zwlschen Brooklyn und Man- 
hattan. Noch ehe das grofie 
Ziel erreicht war, kam Roebling 
bei einem AibeitsunfaH ums 
Leben. Sein Sohn vollendete 
imter den denkbar schwierigsten 
Umstanden das Werk des Va- 
ters; 1883, bei der Eroffnung 
der Brooklyner Briicke huldigte 
eine staunende Welt dem Genie 
von Vater und Sohn: deutsche 
Elnwanderer hatten die Ele- 
mente bezwungen, einen fried- 
lichen Sieg der Technik er- 
rungen. 

Nachstehend veioffentlichen 
wir Kapitelaosziige aus D. B. 
Stelnmans reich illustriertem 
Buch, das sich so abenteuerlich 
und kui'zweilig liest wie die 
besten biographischen Romane. 
Roeblings Schicksal, seine Lei- 
stungen, die wir im Zusammen- 
hang mit dem Jubilaum der 
"Brooklyn Bridge" vor kurzem 
wiirdigten, wurden in dem vor- 



liegenden Band zu einem Werk 
verarbeitet, das in jede dentsch- 
amerikanische Bibliothek und 
zum Wissensschatz eines jeden 
Deutschamerikaners gehort, denn 
es handelt von einem beispiel- 
losen Triumph des menschlichen 
Geistes. 

* 

"Beim Absenken der Caissons 
auf der Brooklyner Seite hatte 
man mancherlei miCliche Er- 
fahrungen gemacht; die Griin- 
dung fiir den New Yorker Tui-m 
bot noch groBere Probleme, 
Schwierigkeiten und Gefahren. 
Plie/3sand£Chichten waren zu 
iiberwinden, eine fast zweimal 
so groJJe Tiefe muBte iiberwun- 
den werden, und man sah sich 
neuen und unbekannten Schrek- 
ken der Caisson - Krankheit 
gegeniiber. 

Die Entscheidung iiber die 
Briicke ^ so welt sie die tech- 
nisclie Moglichkeit des Unter- 
nehmens betraf — lag im Boden 
und unter dem PluBbett des 
East River. Alles hing von dem 
Erfolg dieser Unterwas-serarbeit 
ab, und die Ingenieure der gan- 
zen Welt waren auf das Ergeb- 
nis gespannt. 

Die ersten Bohnmgen, die 
John Roebling fiir die Tuim- 
griindung auf der New Yorker 
Seite gemacht hatte, ergaben die 
erschicckende Tiefe von 32.30 m 
unter dor Wasserlinie — eine 
Tiefe, in der man noch, nie zu 
art>eiten versucht hatte. Durcn 
eine klelne Lageanderung konnte 
diese Tiefe schlieClich um rund 
9 m verringert werden. 



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Reader Comment 






What Is OvtI Engineering's Place? 

# An ENR editorial asked educators to promote civil engineering as a 
valuable and respected profession. 

# Then Prof. S. B. Irish asked, in effect, "What is there to promote?" 

# Here are some answers from our readers . . . 



• 



Sir — With further regard to your edi- 
torial "Civil Engineering's Place" (ENR 
May 7, p. 116) and Prof. S. B. Irish's 
letter on this subject (June 25. p. 7), 
I would like to commend his plea for 
the development of a philosophy to 
embrace the scattered special fields 
that now make up the civil engineering 
profession. 

Historically, the present fields of 
structures, soil mechanics, sanitary en- 
gineering, hydraulics, transportation 
and construction are but the remnants 
of the original all-embracing civil-en- 
gineering profession. Civil engineering 
is without clear-cut objectives or re- 
sponsibilities, and, as a result, we now 
have the most heterogeneous group of 
special fields of any of the engineering 
divisions. This makes it difficult to 
develop a rational common approach 
to research and education. 

Northwestern University held a 
workshop last year in Evanston to 
which we invited twelve participants, 
including civil and industrial engineers, 
planners and operations research spe- 
cialists. After three days of intensive 
review and discussion, the committee 
concluded that the civil engineering 
profession was not recognizing the 
challenge facing it today; that in con- 
centrating on the "trees" of specializa- 
tion we were missing the "forest" of 
broad objectives. 

Five major problems were outlined 
as especially significant: 1. Construc- 
tion 2. Transportation 3. Urban De- 
velopment 4. Overseas Development 
(Technical Assistance) 5. Water Re- 
source Planning. 

It was further concluded that an 
acceptable philosophy to cover the 
broad field could be described as "en- 
vironmental-control planning." This 
infers that the primary objective of civil 
engineering is the control, modification 
and adaptation of the physical environ- 
ment in the interests of man's health, 
comfort, convenience and efficiency; 
further, that a study of planning pro- 
vides the broad socio-economic review 
needed to relate the various specialized 
areas and to establish the criteria neces- 
sary for good design. 

As a result of these recommenda- 
tions, we are now introducing a core 
of environmental control-planning 
courses in the undergraduate program 



and are working toward the use of 
these courses to integrate the special 
areas into a more imified curriculum. 

The retults of this workshop lead 
me to believe that a more compre- 
hensive study of the type envisioned by 
Professor Irish could have far-reaching 
significance. I thoroughly endorse both 
his suggestion and your approval of it, 
John A. Logan 
Professor and Chairman 
Civil Engineering Department 
Nortliwestern University 
Evanston, III. 

► Professor Irish is a very capable pro- 
tagonist for the engineering profession 
in general and civil engineering in 
particular. I have no wish to dispute 
the points he makes, or those in your 
editorial either. But a point you both 
failed to make is considerably more 
important than any of them. 

The "attractiveness" of any profes- 
sion must basically depend upon the 
people in it. For civil engineering, these 
people naturally include Steinmnn. Ter- 
zaghi, the late Hardy Cross, and many 
other brilliant contributors. But, un- 
fortunately. Professor Irish's doleful 
reference to "the more routine and 
mundane problems in which the civil 
engineer is ordinarily engaged" can 
only be an admission that engineering 
"hacks" are also freely accepted into 
this branch of the profession. There is 
no intrinsic reason, however, why civil 
engineering should be more firmly 
bound in such a yoke than any other 
kind of engineering. 

Engineering schools all too often 
confer engineering degrees upon men 
who can never be a real asset within 
the profession and who would them- 
selves be probably better off had they 
taken only sub-professional training in 



Engineering News-Record wel- 
comes expression of opinions from 
its readers. Comment slionld be 
as brief as possible and pertinent 
to subjects of current construc- 
tion importance. Letters should 
be addressed Editor, Engineering 
News-Record, 330 VV. 42nd St., 
New York 36, N. Y. 



the first place. Naturally this comment 
applies more forcefully to .some institu- 
tions than it does to others, but none 
can wholly escape it. Within any such 
institutions, it applies more to some 
departments than to others. It has 
been my observation that civil engi- 
neering departments are the most fre- 
quent and serious offenders in this 
regard. 

Engineering schools and colleges, 
and the individual departments within 
these institutions, can do the engineer- 
ing profession in particular, as well 
as our society in general, a real service 
by making more effective efforts to 
prevent non-professional "hacks" from 
getting engineering degrees. 

They should increase the quality of 
their graduates by being more rigor- 
ously selective in their graduation re- 
quirements, thus permitting a higher 
level of instruction to be used in edu- 
cating a more able student body. This 
may well reduce the total number of 
engineering graduates but it will cer- 
tainly increase the profession's attrac- 
tiveness to qualified persons. It will 
force a sounder recognition of what is 
implied by the term "professional en- 
gineering," and it will promote appro- 
priate adjustment in financial compen- 
sation rates for the consequently 
up-graded professional work. Collater- 
ally, employers will be forced toward 
the use of sub-professional staffs on 
sub-professional work. The certain sup- 
plemental result of such changes will 
be to increase the quality of both pro- 
fessional and sub-professional work 
and, at the same time, to reduce the 
unit cost (to the extent that the term 
is meaningful) of each. 

Press agentry or other effort to at- 
tract more and more guests to the 
party is exactly what is not needed. 
The real need is for some means to 
exclude the freeloaders and the gate- 
crashers. The best place for a "bouncer" 
obviously is at the front door, and 
engineering educational institutions for 
years have constituted the front door 
to the engineering profession. Perhaps 
Professor Irish and his colleagues 
should act more like "bouncers" and 
less like a welcoming committee. 

F. A. Upson 
Hammond, fnd. 



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NEW YORK, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1959. 



MANHATTAN SPAN TO BE REVAMPED 

Two Upper Roadways to Be Rebuilt to Carry Trucks — Cost Is $7,005,980 



By CHARLES G. BENNETT 

The city made known plans 
yesterday for a major recon- 
struction of the Manhattan 
Bridge to cost $7,005,980. 

The plans have been put be- 
fore the Board of Estimate by 
Public Works Commissioner 
Frederick H. Zurmuhlen. The 
board has referred them to 
Budget Director Abraham D. 
Beame. who is expected to sub- 
mit his report at the board's 
Nov. 12 meeting. 

Under the project, the two 
upper deck roadwa.vs, which 
now accommodate only pleasure 
vehicles, will be rebuilt and 
strengthened to carry trucks 
weighing up to twenty tons. 
Lesser repairs will be made to 
the main roadway below. 

Later there will be recon- 
struction of both the Manhattan 
and Brooklyn plazas. On the 
Manhattan side the bridge ap- 
proach will dovetail with a re- 
designed street system that will 
include a connection with the 
new Lower Manhattan Express- 
way. In Brooklyn thefe will be 
a connection with the Brooklyn- 
Queens Expressway. 

The bridge improvement will 
include replacement of existing 
Incandescent lighting with mer- 
cury vapor lamps. 

Torque Is Corrected 

As a preliminary, the city 
completed in 1956 a $2,600,000 
contract for replacing 584 cable 
bands and 854 suspenders. Cable 
bands are circular steel loops 
that attach the suspender.', or 
wire ropes, to the cables. 

The $2,600,000 job was done 
to correct a torque, or twisting 
action, of the bridge's structure 
resulting from stresses and 
strains caused by the B. M. T. 
subway trains on the .cp.in. 

BMT tracks run on both sides 
of the bridge. But during the 



years a preponderance of train 
traffic has been routed onto 
the tracks on the south side 
of the bridge. The unequal 
loading produced the unbal- 
anced stresses and strains. 

The reconstruction timetable 
calls for advertising and let- 
ting of the contract before the 
end of this year and the begin- 
ning of necessary demolition 
work early next year. It is ex- 
pected that at least three years 
•vlU be needed for the job. 

As in the case of the recent 
;hree-year reconstruction of the 
Brooklyn Bridge, the Manhat- 
tan Bridge will remain open to 
traffic during the work. 

BMT trains will continue to 
use the span tracks. The Public 
Works Department and th? po- 
lice will devise traffic patterns 
to be in force during recon- 
struction. 

The Manhattan Bridge will 
be the third of the large East 
River crossings to undergo ma- 
ior reconstruction in the last 
:ew years. In addition to the 
S7,006,000 Brooklyn Bridge re- 
building job, the Public Works 
Department recently finished 
in S?. 000, one project on the 
Queensboro Bridge that includ- 
ed a new upper deck roadway. 

The Manhattan Bridge was 
opened to traffic on New Year's 
Eve, 1909. It extends 6,855 feet 
across the East River from Ca- 
nal Street and the Bowery in 
Manhattan to Nassau Street 
and Flatbush Avenue Extension 
in Brooklyn. 

The main span, 1,470 feet 
long, is suspended from four 
cables, each "1.25 inches in di- 
ameter. 

The plans for the ceconstruc- 
tion w'ere drafted for the Pub- 
lic Works Department by Dr 
David. B Steimnan consuumt, 
engineer. 











Tufts University 
Presents 

STEIN MAN POETRY 
LECTURES 1959-60 

The second year of the Steinman Poetry Lectures opened on October 7, with 
a reading by John Holmes, author of "The Double Root," "Map of My Country," 
"Writing Poetry," and other books. Robert Lowell, Pulitzer Prize winner, author 
of "Lord Weary's Castle," and "Life Studies," read on Oct. 21. The third poet 
was George Starbuck, 1959 winner of the Yale Younger Poets' Award. These 
readings were given in the Coolidge Memorial Room, Ballou Hall, with an informal 
question period foUowing refreshments at the end of the reading. David McCord, 
author of "Star By Day," "The Old Bateau," and editor of "The Pocket Book of 
Light Verse," read in the Arena Theater on Sunday evening, Nov. 23. John 
Ciardi, Tufts '38, poetry editor of the Saturday Review, Director of the Bread Loaf 
Writers' Conference, and author of "As If," "39 Poems," "I Marry You," and 
"Homeward to America," read on Dec. 14, return engagement by popular request. 
Laura Benet read her poems and those of her brothers in English 75, 20th Cen- 
tury Poetry, on Nov. 16. Two San Francisco poets, Michael McQure and Philip 
Whalen, read at 4:30 p.m. in Packard Hall on Nov. 17. 

MAXINE KUMIN Jan. 13 

Mrs. Kumin's first book, "Halfway," wUl be published this year, as well as 
a book for children, "Sebastian and the Dragon." Her poems appear in Harper's. 
The New Yorker, Saturday Review, Hudson Review, etc. She won the Poetry 
Society of America prize for 1959, and is an instructor in English at Tufts 
University. 
COOLIDGE MEMORIAL ROOM, BALLOU HALL 8 P.M. 

RICHARD EBERHART Feb. 19 

At present Consultant in Poetry at the Library of Congress, Mr. Eberhart is 
on leave of absence from Dartmouth College. He is the author of "Reading the 
Spirit," "Undercliff," "Great Praises," and other books; his "Collected Poems, 
1930-1960," will appear this year. Educated at Dartmouth College and Cam- 
bridge University, he publishes his poems and books in England and America. He 
has won the Harriet Monroe Prize and the Shelley Memorial Prize, and was a 






"He that overcometh shall 
inherit all things; and I 
will he his Cod, and he 
shall be my son." 



4iHt»d P. ^aaU Pk. V. 

Economist. Consultant and Lecturer 

HI-OAKS - II49S OAKHURST ROAD 

LARGO, FLORIDA 



Helen R. Haake, Secretary 
Phone: juniper 4-4559 



December 27, 1959 



D. B. Steinman, Consulting Engineer 
117 Liberty Street 
New York 6, N.Y. 



Dear Dr. Steinman, 



Thank you for the copy of the latest book on yourself. 
I enjoyed the Long Crossing very much and anticipate 
no less the pleasure of reading the longer story of 
your life, 

I am grateful that you have and keep me on your mailing 
list. I think your poetry, and I mean poetry, is among 
the most beautiful penetrating of modem verse. It is a 
great gift and you use it well. 

May you enjoy a thoroughly satisfactory New Year with 
still growing influence on your fellow man. For your 
bridges of iron and stone are at best the symbols of 
other spaces which you help men to bridge in their 
thinking and living, helping men to find their way to 
God, the greatest bridge of all , 



Sincerely yours. 




(?. 




(^ 



k\tT9d.lf, Haake 
III4.96 Oakhurst Road 
Largo, Florida 



RECEIVED 



O. B. STEINMAJvj 



LOYOLA UNIVERSITY 



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COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES __^^^ 

6526 Xorth Sheridan Road, Chicago 26, Illinois * BRiargate i-3000 December U, 195? 

Dr. David B. SteliUDUi 
17 Liberty Street 
New Toiic 6, New York 

Dear Dr. Steininan: 

The David B, Steinman Lectures for 1959-60 got off to a wonderful start laat 
night. All of the tickets for the lecture were exhausted about three days 
before. The auditorium was full — about 750 people* 

Mr. Van Doren arrived at Loyola about I^ o'clock and met infonnalily with faculty 
and students at a tea that lasted until about 5 o'clock. 

In the evening I itself made introductory remarks acknowledging especially ou^ 
debt to you. I made reference to your poem "As a Starless Sky." No doubt I 
was taking some liberties with the meaiiings you intended. Bat I likened the 
"dream" of the first stsnxa to your bridgebuilding and the vision involved in 
it. I associated the "song" of the second atanzB, with your work as a poet and 
your generous patronage of poetry. And the "prayer" of the third stanza. I 
suggested as symbolic of your deep sense of spiritual values* 

Since this was the first lecture in the series, Fr. Mulligan, the Vice-President 
and Dean of Faculties, also spoke on behalf of the University's administration 
of our gratitude to you. 

Then Mr. Van Doren was formally introduced h7 Dr. Earl John Clark of our de- 
partment. In place of reading many short selections, Mr. Van Doren read two 
long ones with generous commentary on them. It was a highly successful per- 
formance, with the speaker and the audience showing their mutual admiration 
at the conclxision of it. Afterwards there was a reception for about fifty 
people, at which the same tone prevailed. 

We ourselves are vezy much pleased thus far, and I hope that when you read 
this you will be too. 

We have been intending from the outset to ask if you would like to come to 
Chicago to introduce one of the speakers, I assvuned that since you had just 
gone south you would probably not want to come up here at this time. Perhaps 
you woTild like to introduce Robert Penn Warren, on April 6. Ihis would be 
fitting in that it would provide a good culmination of the series and in that 
the weather may be good here at that time. Please let me know when you can, 
if you would like to do this* 

I hope that you and Mrs. Steinman are enjoying good weather in Florida and 

that your stay there will be a most pleasant one* r, r- .^ c i ir i:< r. 

K ft- y^Eji V £< L/ 

Tezy sincerely yourSf 

W^ DEC 7 1359 



^"^l^^V 



John ?. Gerrietts 

Caiairman, Department of SBcliah ^' ^' STEINMAN 
JSGspat 



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3% 



PRISM 



THE OFFICIAL ORGAN 

OF THE 

POETRY SOCIETY OF AUSTRALIA 



Afl Through a Misted Glaaa 

by 

O.B. Steinman 

As through a misted glass ire faintly glimpse 

A shimmering vision of the spirit realm — 

The veil that mortal eye may never rend. 

We gaze with yearning toward that fair mirage, 

Striving to hold it as it fades from view. 

Then we awake, but never can we know 

Which state is dream, and which reality. 



April, 1959 



3fe 




IS 





D. B. Steinman 

NOT LIKE LUCIFER 

O men of science who, with single aim. 
Explore the elemental mysteries — 
The pulse of light, the atom's secret core. 
The swing and orbit of the cycling stars: 
What of the things beyond your utmost lore. 
That neither graph nor scale nor rod can gauge. 
Nor lens of telescope detect or span? 

Whence burns your flame of selfless enterprise. 
Your ceaseless quest to fathom the unknown? 
What inner spark illuminates your mind 
And spurs your search for truth exalting man? 

High priests and acolytes of nature's laws: 
Be not like Lucifer in pride of power. 
Rather more humble grow, more reverent. 
Your miracles but glorify the Source, 
The Logos, perfect Word, that preconceived 
The vast sublimities you now unveil. 
With aeons visioned in the primal plan, 
The laws of nature are the thoughts of God. 



AVALON ANTHOLOGY 

1959 



















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DECEMBER 1959 




THE BENT of TauBetafi 



WHO'S WHO IN TAU BETA PI 



Dr. David B. Steinman, Sew York Alpha '06, received the 
top award in the annual competition of the American Institute of 
Steel Construction for his Mackinac Bridge, spanning the Mackinac 
Straits in Michigan. This is the ninth Steinman bridge honored 
in the annual artistic bridge awards. In October he received the 
Ernest E. Howard award by the American Society of Civil Engi- 
neers. A book about the Mackinac Bridge has been written by 
William Ratigan, called, "The Long Crossing." The book is pub- 
lished by W. B. Eerdmans, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and is 
written chiefly for young people. 



• 






Final Curtain 

by 

D.B. Steinman 



And now the play is drawing to an end. 

It thrilled me while it lasted, though I knew 

In time the final curtain must descend. 

The veil between the unreal and the true 

Almost forgotten, in the drama's sway. 

In bright illusion's spell, how moments flewl 

I want to thank the Author for the play, 
Its laughter and its tears - I did not weep 
Though stage lights dimmed. Content, I go my way 

Drawn by the tender call of home and sleep,, 
I have a rendezvous with love to keepo 



PRISM 



December 1959 



5e 



ERNEST 

E. 

HOWARD 

AWARD 




American -Society of Civil Encixef.rs 

1959 







5Crui Vnxk "1 



November 5, 1959 



Dr. David B. Steinman 
117 Liberty Street 
New York 7 , New York 

Dear Dr. Steinman: 

Thank you for the autographed copy of your book, 
Songs of a Bridge-builder , certainly a modest poet-engineer's 
title. 

I enjoyed the total collection of poems. They 
convey the power of your faith in man and God, and in man's 
ability through use of creation and through contemplation of the 
realities — if only his eyes of sight and mind would see the 
realities — to contribute to joy and goodness and beauty. 

Men should ever hold you in grateful reverence 
for your distinguished bridges and poems. They will read both 
literally and find in them the artistic use of words, materials, and 
rhythms. Moreover, the human spirit will also respond to the 
artistry of their design and music. Beyond and most of all, your 
poems and bridges will live in men's hearts for the visions of 
exalting truth they inspire: courage and faith, hope and love, and 
sudden flashes or illuminations about the Divine order working in 
and through man. 

May you have deep and lasting joys of accomplish- 
ment in Songs of a Bridge-builder . 



Cordially, 







Brother Augustine Philip, F. S.C. 

BAP:mkd PRESIDENT 

KECE1VH.D 

MOV 6 19S9 
O. B. STEINMAN 



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Wisconsin 
Poetry Magazine 



November December^ 1959 



RAINBOW IN ALOHA 

^l^^hen last I saw that island paradise 

4LIL1 (What pang of parting as we sailed away!) 

A farewell rainbow flowered in the skies 

And spectra sparkled in the surf 'tossed spray. 

The air, the scene, the moment cast a spell 
As memorybinding as a fond refrain. 
The sunlit waves; soft voices, like a bell 
Tolling us back: "Until we meet again." 

There East meets West. Upon those shores of light, 
That isle of smiles, that port of friendly faces, 
All colors blend — yellow and brown and white — 
And make the land of Aloha a haven of races. 



— D.B. Steinman 



Hammerhead piers 
carry turnpike bridge 






D. B. STEINMAN, F. ASCE, Consulting Engineer, New York, N. Y. 



C. H. GRONQUIST, F. ASCE, Associate Engineer with D. B. Steinmon, Consulting Engineer, New York, N. Y. 



taoli roadway of the James lliver 
bridge on the Richmond-Petersburg 
Turnpike is supported separately by 
hammerhead piers. A total of 100 of 
these piers carries the 4,182-ft-Iong 
bridge over the historic James River at 
Richmond. Single-column piers, set to 
the angle of the stream, allowed square 
rather than skew span construction. 
This method of construction was also 
advantageous in pier location for the 
northern half of the bridge. Situated in 
downtown Richmond, this part of the 
bridge passes over viaducts that carry 
the Southern Railroad, the Chesapeake 
and Ohio Railroad, and the Seaboard 
Airline Railroad. 

The 90-ft-wide James River Bridge 
is the largest structure on the recently 
completed Richmond-Petersburg Turn- 
pike in Virginia. Since the river is shal- 
low and navigable only by small boats, 



88-ft steel, simple-beam, composite 
spans proved economical for the river 
portion of the project. Simple-beam 
spans up to 96 ft in length, and girder 
spans up to 115 ft in length, were em- 
ployed over land in Richmond, al- 
though a 260-ft skew truss spans the 
railroad parking lot at the Main Street 
Railroad Station to meet requirements 
of the Seaboard Airline Railroad Com- 
pany. The south half of the bridge is on 
tangent; a 1-deg curve begins near the 
north bank of the river, and a 4-dcg 
curve occurs beyond Main Street at the 
skew truss span. 

The reinforced concrete deck con- 
sists of two 40-ft roadways separated by 
a 4-ft mall, with a 2-ft walkway on each 
side. Concrete parajiets are surmounted 
by aluminum railings 18 in. high, in 
which the electrical cables for the road- 
way lighting system run. 



The two-year construction period re- 
quired fast scheduling and careful co- 
ordination of the operations of all con- 
tractors. In order to open the bridge 
and turnpike to traffic by June 30, 1958, 
it was necessary to start placing the 7- 
in. concrete deck slab in the previous 
December and to continue throughout 
the winter months. This was done with 
the use of heated aggregates, but no 
special protection was given to the deck 
concrete after placing, other than to 
cover it with plastic blankets and tar- 
paulins. 

Pier design 

The columns for all the hammerhead 
])iers were made 7 ft 9 in. in diameter, 
and the 44-ft top struts or hammer- 
lieads for all the piers, except for those 
in a few longer girder spans, have the 
same diniensions, to minimize vari- 



Worldng from a timber trestle. Bowers Construction Co. built 
the river piers, pouring the columiui in maximum liits oi 16 ft. 
Hammerhead ionns were made self-supporting by use of truss- 



ing bearing against the column concrete. At right, a traveling 
derrick on the roadway deck sets steel brought out on a car 
operating on two oi the adjacent roadwoy beams. 




November 1959 • CIVIL ENGINEERING 



AMERICAN 








NOVEMBER 19S9 



"W 



.«?■' 




This month's cover — The vital artery across Mackinac Straits between 
Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas, Mackinac Bridge, won the Class I 
Award in the American Institute of Steel Construction's Annual Bridge Compe- 
tition (see other winners on page 26). The Class I Award is for the most 
beautiful steel bridge, with a span of 400 feet or more, opened for traffic 
during the preceding year. The jury, in picking the Bridge for the Award, 
praised this "monumental structure" for its "strength, handsome silhouette and 
beauty it gains from its noble proportions and mass." The Bridge is owned by 
the Mackinac Bridge Authority; designed by D. B. Steinman, a member of 
ARBA's Engineering Division; and fabricated by the American Bridge Division, 
U. S. Steel Corporation, a member of ARBA's Materials and Services Division. 






JETS-O-GRAM ACADEMIC UNIT 
on 

STATICS 

RIGID STRUCTURES 



MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION OF STATIC STRUCTURES 



TESTING THE MACKINAC BRIDGE FOR AERODYNAMIC STABILITY 

Static structures are designed and built according to definite 
mathematical formulae. Engineers know they will do the job for 
which they are intended, but every new design however, is an 
adventure because man is always being confronted with new prob- 
lems and elements as he pushes his structures further in the sky, 
deeper into the earth, or like a bridge, across greater spans of 
space. 

When confronted with an unknown element, he must have some 
means of measuring and evaluating the structure he has designed 
before it is built. For this purpose, he has devised testing techniques 
and tools which enable him to determine the effectiveness of the 
proposed structure. When engineers design something, they know 
it will be stable, then they get even greater professional satisfaction 
out of testing it or its conmponent parts and seeing them meet the 
requirements of design. 

Pressure is one thing to be figured, but in bridges, another 
factor - oscillation - or sway, caused by winds must be considered 
in design. In a structure reaching high above land and water, wind 
velocities put great force on the mennbers and the entire structure 
must be tested fronn an aerodynamic standpoint. Lift and drag of 
air nnust be studied just as it nnust be studied on the wings or other 
flight surfaces of an aircraft. 

There is perhaps no more static structure yet one subjected to 
greater winds than the Straits Bridge which joins the Upper and 
Lower Peninsulas of Michigan. On this, oscillation has to be 
investigated to its fullest extent to test the design. 



y-ry^^ 




Building 



"Roebling's Dream." When John A. Roebling completed his design of 
Brooklyn Bridge, a member of his staff made this drawing. All the 
weight of the bridge is in the two towers, their foundations, and the 
anchorages for the cables. The rest is wire, slender by contrast, spidery 
against the sky, but endowed through the magical art of John Roebling 
with strength that matches the time-defying massiveness of the masonry. 



Brooklyn Bridge 



The greatest drama 
in the history of bridge building 

BY D. B. STEINMAN 



D. B. Steinman studied engineering at Columbia, where 
his dissertation was a design for the proposed Henry 
Hudson Bridge. Twenty-five years later he was chosen to 
carry out the plan. Hundreds of other bridges, all over 
the world, are also his work. His achievements have 
brought him 24 honorary degrees from universities in sev- 
eral countries. Dr. Sleinman's books include the builders 
OF THE BRIDGE (Revised: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 
1950), about the father and son who designed and built 
Brooklyn Bridge. 



WccASiONALLY Something gets done that is so un- 
precedented, so grand, that it sets new standards for 
human aspiration. The erection of Brooklyn Bridge was 
such an achievement. And because certain intangibles 
of the human spirit went into it, it has kept its urgent 
appeal to our imaginations. To me — remembering the 
days when I was a poor boy living in the shadow of the 
Bridge and being moved by its mysteries to become a 
designer of bridges myself — Brooklyn Bridge is sacred. 
In 1 867 there was no doubt of the need for a bridge 
to link Brooklyn and the rest of Long Island to Man- 
hattan Island, across East River. The population of 
Brooklyn was growing explosively; 266,000 in I860, 
it reached 396,000 in 1870, an increase of 50 percent 
in a single decade. A vast number of Brooklynites 



5 9 





MIDWEST 
CHAPARRAL 

FALL - WINTER, 1958-1959 



#OSOC2Si^e2SOC^2S^€2SSSDBQS^<^2SO<:2SS^ 



My Creed 

To follow my star and breast the wave. 
Nor once to furl my sail; 

Whatever waits beyond the grave. 
Never to quit or quail. 

But here and now to heed my heart 
And help my fellow man. 

For each of us is but a part 
Of an eternal plan. 

To thank the Giver for His trust 

In lending life to me. 
Whether this spark returns to dust 

Or immortality. 

— D. B. Steinman 

New York 




Th« Mageain® of rhe Rsgistered Prelessionof Enatneer 

OCTOSfR 1959 



Steinman to Head 
MDAA Division 

Dr. David B. Steinman, New 
York City, has been named chair- 
man for the third consecutive year 
of the Engineers and Scientists 
Division of Muscular Dystrophy 
Associations of America, Inc., it 
has been announced by William 
Mazer, MDAA president. 

Dr. Steinman will organize sup- 
port for MDAA's 1959 Campaign 
for funds to increase medical re- 
search into the crippling, muscle 
wasting disease, muscular dys- 
trophy. 



mn 






-■:•. •ViJ''/-. 



Kems 



St. Lawrence University, Canton, N. T., Wednesday, Marcb 18, 19» 




DAVID B. STEINMAN 



Steinman Famous 
As Engineer, Poet 

Why the Spring Festival of Arts 
is prefaeed with the name David B. 
Steinman has been a point of cur- 
iosity to many students. To enlight- 
en them, his najne has been affixed 
to this event because he gave the 
University $1,500 last year to make 
the lirst Festival possible. 

Dr. Steinman is the dean of mod- 
ern bridge builders. But this man is 
not, as often happens, "one-track 
minded" about engineering and his 
bridges. He is also a poet. A com- 
bination to be admired, he is a liv- 
ing example of what a liberal arts 
college stands for — education of the 
whole man. This is the reason for 
his interest in art and thus oux 
Festival. 

On the bridgre-building side, 
Steinman is known for his principle 
of aerodynamic oscillation, which 
in plain English, is the construc- 
tion of suspension bridges to with- 
stand winds. This principle made 
possible his Mackinaw Bridge in 
Michigan which is five miles long 
and cost $100 million. It is the big- 
gest and costliest suspension bridge 
in the world. But in time it may be 
surpassed by another Steinman 
colossus, a five-mile long bridge 
across the Strait of Messina be- 
tween Italy and Sicily. 

Called the "poet in steel", he has 
also had 200 poems published, most 
of them about bridges and their 
builders. The patron of our Spring 
Festival oif the Arts, Dr. David B. 
Steinman. is an example of a well- 
rounded professional man. 



V^TGcWD 



3 6 



^k& Amenican Ra/id 



41 Years of Continual Publication 



October, November, December, 1959 



PocHU O^ S^f^ /4m€nlc^ 



Ojibwa Legend 

By the falls of Tahkamennon, 
Frostbound in the silent moonlight, 
Sat an old chief in his wigwam, 
White-haired warrior, battle- weary. 
Huddled in a snowy blanket. 
With his strength now swiftly fading. 
He recalled his feats of prowess, 
Boasted of his former magic. 

"When I blew my breath upon them, 
Streams and waterfalls stopped flowing, 
Turned to ice of stony hardness. 
When I shook my locks, the snow fell, 
Ck)vered forest land and prairie; 
Birds flew south and beasts found burrows. 
None so mighty as Pebowan, 
Wielder of the blasts of winter." 

Came a young brave to the wigwam. 
Fair of face and manner godlike. 
Thus he spoke with voice like music: 
"When I come the earth awakens: 
Flowers spring up at my whisper; 
My soft breath unlocks the waters. 
Spreads blue skies and April glory, 
Calls the birds back from the southland. 

"At my nod fall gentle showers. 
Bathing vale and hill with freshness, 
Giving life to leaf and blossom; 
With my song the land rejoices. 
Let me dwell here; I am Seegwun, 
Spirit of rebirth and gladness." 
Dawnlight found the frost-king vanished, 
By the spell of springtime banished. 

ATew York David B. Steinman 



Articulo publicado en el n.*^ 110 de la 
Revista Informes de la Construccion 

Abril 1959 



proyecto 




puente sobre el rio QUINNIPIAC 

Informacion omablemente facilitada por el autor del proyecto Dr. Steinman 

562 ■ 45 



El puente sobre el rio Quinnipiac, en New Haven (EE. UU.), es, de las obras de fabrica de 
la autS de Connecticut, la de mayor longitud, y presenta la particulandad de salvar 
su tiamo central, de 118 m de luz, con cuatro vigas gemelas de alma llena, tipo cantilever, 
y parte rectilinea de cierre de unos 33 m de longitud. 



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Dr. David Barnard Stelnman, PE 

A lifetime of distinguished service to his profession has propelled 
Dr. David Barnard Steinman, PE, to international prominence 
as a master designer of bridges. Over 400 bridges, on five conti- 
nents of this earth, bear testimony to Dr. Steinman's genius and 
widely acclaimed accomplishments. He has received awards for a 
brilliant record in research of the aerodynamics of bridge struc- 
tures and the application of metallurgical developments to bridge 
construction. 

Now 78 years old, the master bridge-builder modestly ac- 
knowledges the many honors his works have earned him as he still 
continues planning his next project, which he believes to be the 
most inspiring of his career — a new span across the Messina 
Straits, linking the mainland of Italy and Sicily, the cost of which 
is estimated at $150 million. 

Born on New York's lower east side, virtually within the shadow 
of the Brooklyn Bridge, Dr. Steinman was fascinated as a boy 
with the structural play of this famed bridge. Through his early 
formative years, this bridge served as a personal symbol of his 
own aspiration to become a designer of bridges. As an under- 
graduate, he attended The College of the City of New York where 
he proved a brilliant student, graduating summa cum laude. He 
received his graduate degrees in engineering from Columbia Uni- 
versity. In addition he has received over 20 honorary degrees in 
science, engineering, philosophy, literature, humanities and law 
bestowed upon him by such universities as Bologna, Ghent, Colum- 
bia, Michigan, RPI, Loyola and others. 

Early in his career, he designed in association with Holton D. 
Robinson, the winning entry for the Florianapolis Bridge com- 
petition, now the largest bridge in South America. Since then, his 
works have been legion, including the Hell Gate Arch Bridge, 
the Carquinez Strait Bridge in California, the longest cantilever 
bridge in the U. S. — the Mount Hope Bridge in Providence, R. I., 
the Tri-Borough Bridge in New York City, the Thousand Islands 
International Bridge, and the recently completed Mackinac Bridge 
in Michigan, which is five miles long 

He played a significant role in the organization of the National 
Society of Professional Engineers, and he served as first president 
of that society, as well as president of its New York Chapter. 
Dr. Steinman's illustrious career includes several years spent as 
I'rofessor of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, and lecturer at 
leading universities and colleges. He is the author of over 750 pub- 
lications, including 20 books and 600 technical papers and profes- 
sional articles. His undaunted spirit and belief in the engineer's 
invaluable service to humanity are reflected in his 150 poems, 
published in four anthologies and numerous literary journals. His 
honors and medals, virtually innumerable, include the French 
Legion of Honor, eight Artistic Bridge Awards, the William Proc- 
tor Award for scientific achievement, the Toicnsend Harris Medal 
and the Kimbrough Gold Medal of the American Institute of Steel 
Construction. 

An opponent of specialization in engineering curricula, Dr. 
Steinman abhors the prevailing shortage of engineers and the lack 
of a broad liberal foundation upon which a student in engineering 
may build his courses. He believes, "the engineer should take the 
position of a cultured professional— a leader of men." The David B. 
Steinman Foundation was established to further these beliefs 
through grants to education for research and student aid. A re- 
spected authority and a benevolent humanitarian. Dr. Steinman 
summarizes his feelings toward his profession : "To me engineer- 
ing has been a succession of inspiring influences, of compelling 
ambitions, of obstacles overcome and dreams come true. The 
realization — one after another — of dreams that seemed hopeless 
leaves me reverent and humble." Indeed, scholar, educator, poet, 
author, engineer Steinman is a great and gifted man. 



ip 



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THE AUSTRALASIAN 

ENGINEER 



National Society off Proffessional Engineers 

IMPORT A^a• AMERICAN BODY 



Dr. D. B. Steinman, leading Ameri- 
can engineer, who has desif;ned some 
of the greatest bridges of our times, 
some twenty-five years og in 1934, to 
use his own words, "dreamed of a 
national organisation of, by and for, 
all engineers — a national organisation 
dedicated to a great cause, a defined, 
integrated and unified Engineering 
Profession. 

Citing the American Medical Asso- 
ciation and the American Bar Associa- 
tion as precedents, he envisioned a 
strong unifying National Society of 
Professional Engineers with State 
Societies and County chapters as 
integral component units. 

At that time there were only two 
societies of professional engineers, one 
in New Jersey and one in New York, 
There were, however, over ninety 
older established technical societies, 
but they served rather to emphasise 
the division of the profession in so 
many technical branches and special 
ties. 

With his natural enthusiasm and 
application. Dr. Steinman spoke exten- 
sively about organising such a body 
as he envisaged and- on May 25th, 
1934, the National Society of Profes- 
sional Engineers was born. Som» sug- 
gested that the National Society should 



be merely a federation of state 

societies, but he stressed individual 

membership and voice in the National 

Society. 

Registration of Engineers 

Dr. Steinman insisted that the most 
important way to advance the status 
of the engineer, his standing in public 
recognition and esteem, was to estab- 
lish a clear-cut line of demarcation 
between engineers and non-engineers 
so that the public would know, and 
the profession would know, and the 
individual himself would know who 
is and who is not an engineer. He 
contended that the only effective 
method of establishing this line of 
recognition was by legal qualification 
and registration. 

With the inspiration and impetus of 
the newly-formed National Society, 
the registration movements gained 
momentum and before long engineers" 
Registration Laws were on the statute 
books in all of the forty-eight States, 
the district of Columbia and in every 
territory and possession of the U,S,A, 
At the same time State Societies of 
Profes.sional Engineers were also 
formed in every State and territory. 



Twenty-fifth Anniversary 

On July 20th, 1959. the organisa- 



tion held its Twenty-fifth Anniversary 
and Dr. Steinman. as the founder and 
first President, was requested to 
address the gathering. 

Looking back across the span of 
Twenty-five years, we can view the 
results of our vision and sacrifice with 
a deep glow of satisfaction. The 
National Society, started in 1934 with 
four young State Societies, now num- 
bers a total of 50,000 members, fifty 
member State Societies, and 400 Local 
Chapters, with 4,000 Committees, all 
working for the advancement of the 
engineering profession in public 
recognition and esteem. 

Our dream has come true. We have 
achieved public and legislative recog- 
nition that Engineering is a Profession, 
that Engineering is a learned Profes- 
sion, that Engineering is one Profes- 
sion. 

Personally. I feel that I have lived 
manv lives in one Hfetime, and that 
the life I gave to my profession has 
not been lived in vain. For those of 
us who have known the struggles and 
the hardships of engineering in the 
lean and difficult years, there is deep 
satisfaction in knowing that we have 
done our part in making engineering 
a finer, nobler, and more satisfying 
profession for those who come after 



August^ 1959 



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MIRi^CLE: AT MA.CKINA.C 



BY PRENTISS M. BROWN 

Chairman, Mackinac Bridge Authority 



High over the Straits workmen check diameter of a giant cable during construction of "The Great Bridge." 



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THB STORY BBHIND THE CLASSIFICATION • NUMBER 79 



Sa 



David B. Stelnman 

has designed and bnilt more 

than 400 bridges thronghont the 

world. One of them is 

the flve-mlle-Iong Mackinac 



DOWHTOWR ircw YORK CITT, HEW TfOOT 


K.Y.-5051 


MiHsna • N*Mt 

Stelna&D, Ikrld B. 
117 Liberty Stiwt 
Haw Tork^ Ifsv Tork 

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0»T« 0» EMTItV 

12-51-1958 


Coiuultln« 
av«lnear 


AotlTt 



DEAN OF THE BRIDGE BUILDERS 




S8 



JOURNAL 

OF THE 

AMERICAN 
CONCRETE 
INSTITUTE 



Steinman receives 
ASCE Howard award 

The ASCE Ernst E. Howard award is 
the latest of a long list of honors con- 
ferred on David B. Steinman, inter- 
nationally famous engineer. Presenta- 
tion was made at the recent annual 
ASCE meeting in Washington, D. C 

Known and honored the world over 
as the designer and builder of beautiful 
bridges. Dr. Steinman is currently cited 
"for his signal contribution towards the 
advancement of bridge analysis and de- 
sign, to the theory of the suspension 
bridge and its aerodynamic stability, 
and specially for his outstanding work 
in the design of the Mackinac bridge." 
The Mackinac bridge is the ninth Stein- 
man bridge honored in the annual 
artistic bridge awards. 

Author of over 750 published works, 
Dr. Steinman has received four other 
ASCE awards for his papers, including 
the Norman medal in 1923 and 1951. 



December 1959 



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^ The METHODIST MESSENGER 



Volume 9 — No. 2 



Published by the Methodist Church, St. Ignace, Michigan 



December 1959 



i 




CHRISTMAS MAGIC 



The star-shaped snowflakes softly fall 
To deck each bough with sparkling 
white 

With magic wand and stars are hung 
Like jewels of celestial light 

The treetop holds, as crowning gem 
The glowing Star of Bethlehem! 

Once shepherds saw the wondrous light 
Beside a crib they knelt in prayer 

The humblest hearth now glows witn 
Love 
Because His gift — a Child — is there! 

The Angel voices sing again: 

Peace on Earth, Good Will to Men! 

DR. DAVID B. STEINMAN 
in Songs of a Bridgebuilder 



I 



I 



I 






THE AUSTRALASIAN ENGINEER 



Increasing Safety of Bridge Construction 

AERODYNAMIC STABILITY SOLUTIONS BY Dr. DAVID B. STEINMAN 



Dr. David B. Steinman, the famous 
bridge designer, recently received a 
medal from the Franklin Institute in 
Philadelphia for his outstanding paper, 
'"The Design of the Mackinac Bridge 
for Aerodynamic Stability." 

Dr. Steinman was among the first 

to have recognised the importance of 

'aerodynamic oscillations for bridge 

construction. He is not satisfied with 



(From Our New York Correspondent) 

some of the existing bridges. As he 
pointed out a short time ago, some 
twenty bridges completed since 1930 
have been subjected to disturbing or 
dangerous oscillations. At least two of 
them, the Golden Gate Bridge in San 
Francisco, and the Bronx-Whitestone 
Bridge in New York, meanwhile have 
undergone costly stiffening reconstruc- 
tion. 






It 



.1' i 



Lesson from the Tacoma Narrows 
Bridge Collapse 

In 1940 the narrow strait between 
Tacoma and the Olympic Peninsula in 
Washington State, was spanned by a 
«u.-pension bridge which collapsed in 
a 42mile-an-hour wind after four 
months of existence. The motions of 
the suspension span, even in gentle 
breezes, caused seasickness among the 
construction workers. Dr. Steinman 
had previously suggested that the span 
be stiffened. 

Dr. Steinman used his principles of 
.lerodynamic bridge construction in 
Michigan's Mackinac Bridge, the long- 
est suspension bridge of the world. 
He described the principle by these 
words: "When the bridge floor is mov- 
ing up, the resultant aerodynamic 
forces act down, and vice versa. As 
a result, any incipient vibration (as 
from traffic) is quickly brought to 
rest. The bridge actually utilizes the 
force of the wind to produce stability; 
the stronger the wind, the more stable 
the bridge." 

Ralph Segman stated that thouRh 
aerodynamics has been utilized by air- 
craft designers from the beginning of 
the air age, they were not applied to 
bridges. Wings are shaped in such 
a way that the airflow around them 
produces a greater pressure on the 
under surface, thus a lifting force. 
Similar forces act on bridge roadways. 
In a steady wind, the flexible span 
tends to oscillate up and down in 
harmony with the air pressure which 
acts rhythmically to force it up and 
then down. These oscillations are self- 
exciting and may, in a short time, be- 
come violent in non-aerodynamic 
bridges. 

Contributing to the high degree of 
aerodynamic stability of the Mackinac 
Bridge is the provision of wide open 
sDaces between the stiffening trusses 
and the outer edges of the roadway. 
The trusses are spaced 68 ft. apart 
and the roadway is only 48 feet wide, 
leaving open spaces 10 ft. wide on 
each side, for the full length of the 
suspension bridge. For further per- 
fection of aerodynamic stability, the 
equivalent of wide longitudinal open- 
ing is provided in the middle of the 
roadway. 

The two outer lanes, each 12 feet 
wide, are made solid, and the two 
Designed by Dr. Steinman, who has been responsible for the design of 400 bridges, inner lanes and the centre mall (24 ft. 

of width) are made of opengrid con- 
1(0 of which are major constructions. struction. Wind-tunnel tests have con- 



i ki'J 



/ /,„.«rfiJS m 




MACKINAC BRIDGE 






^ St 



emnian 



At the right is a sketch of Dr. David Steinman, 
noted engineer and designer of the Mackinac Bridge. 
For a third season. Dr. Steinman has enabled the 
English fJepartment at Loyola to present a series 
of lectures and readings by well-known poets. 
Through his generosity, students, teachers, and de- 
votees of poetry throughout the Chicago area, have 
had an opportunity to hear readings by no less than 
Robert Frost, \V. H. Auden. E. E. Cummings, 
Marianne Moore, and Allen Tate. Already, this 
season, Loyola has been visited by Mark Van Doren 
and John Crowe Ransom. Yet, like so many pa- 
trons. Dr. Steinman s interest in poetry is not limited 
to patronage: he has written and published a con- 
siderable amount of his own poetry. In this issue 
of Cadence, we are honored to print one of these 
poems. 




The Harp 

D. B. Steinman 

Five stories high above a city street 
He dwelt, a child with wonder in his eyes. 
For him, through winter cold and summer heat, 
The sunbeams danced and stars sang lullabies. 

One day, as if on wings, a stranger came 
And stood within the room, unheralded. 
Gently he spoke, calling the boy by name: 
"David, play on your harp!" he softly said. 

How did the stranger guess the secret dream 
That, day and night, within the child's heart burned? 
Outside the window, In the sunset gleam, 
Glittered the Instrument for which he yearned: 

A bridge! The cables swung across the bay. 
The strands that hummed like harp-strings murmuring, 
They whispered to the child, "Some day . . Some day 
"There is my harp, sir. I can hear it sing!" 



Reprinted from the Fall 1959 issue of CADENCE 



DIE BAUTECHNIK"*" 

MIT „KERNENERGIE UND BAUTECHNIK" 
„VORFERTIGUNO IN DER BAUTECHNIK" - ..BAUMASCH I NEN UND BAUBETRIEB" 



36. Jahrgang 



BERLIN, November 1959 



Heft 1 1 



VERSCHIEDENES 



Einiges vom amerikanischen GroBbruckenbau der Nachkriegszeit 




BiM 1. Ansiriit iler Madtill«c-Bru<Jte 



Amerika wird bald um einige aufsehenerregende groBe Hange- 
briicken reicber sein. Diese warden die Reihe fortsetzen, welcbe vor 
hundert Jahren mit dem Bau der Brooklynbriicke iiber den Eastriver 
in New York begann, aU ea dem Deutschamerikaner John R o b 1 i n g 
gelang, die Hangekabel im Luftspinnverfabren am Bauwerk herzu- 
stellen. Bis zum zweilen Weltkrieg schien es, aU ob die 1937 er- 
rirhtete Goldcn-Gate-Briicke in San P'ranzisko mit J280 m Spann- 
weite der Mittelbffnung den SrfiliiBpnnkt ilieser Reihe darstelli-n 
wUrde. <lenn sie iitiertraf l)preits die 1932 erbante Georjje- 
Washington-Briiikf um 213 m. Abi-r sdiou kurz nadi dem Krie;; 
scbmiedeten die amerikanisdien Injienieiire Plane fiir nodi groliere 
BriiiJtenl)aiilen. Imponierend ist. (laB sie sirh hiirbei niflit dnrdi 
Ru<-ksi4iliijie — wie den Einstiirz der grolien Taconiabrijrke — be- 
irren lielien. Sie snchten vielniehr mit grolier Griindliilikeit. die 
Ursadien dieser Fehlsdilage zu erforsdien. Die Untprsudinngen 
ergaben. dali iiie Taromabriicke iind man<4ie andere Briicke nur iin- 
geniigende Querslabililat hatte nnd gegen Windkriifte nidit sidier 
genug war. Als erste Folgerung wnrden alle Hiingebriirken. ilie den 
neu gewonnenen Erkennlnissen nidil eiitspradjen, vcrsliirkl. Dies 
ges<4iab meist durdi Einzieben von Sdiriiiiseilen oder dnrdi den 
Einliau von Verbiinden. nni die \ erdrebungssteifigkeit zu erbiiben. 
Bei der 19.*>2 fertiggestelllen Cbesapeake-Briiike dem er^teii 

grolieren Nenbau - — zeigt sidi nodi eine gewisse Znriifkbaltnng. 
denn die in die.sem 6.9 km langen Briiikeiizng verwendete Hiin^i'- 
briicke bat ..nur" eine Spannweite von [H't m; im iibrigen wnrden 
Fadiwerktrjiger angewendet (teils als Hetk- nnd teils als Trog- 
briiike). iSadi .'Vbsdiluli der 1 ntersiidiungen konnlen die amerika- 
nisdien liigenicnre sodann im November I9r)7 ibre nenesle nnd nun- 
mebr griilite Hiingebriii-ke dem \erkebr iibergeben, die Maikinae- 
Brii<ke. die iiber die W asserslrali** gleidien Namens im Norden der 
\ereinigten Slaalen fiibrt (sielie Bild 1|. Bei dieser Briiike — eineiii 
Werk des Briitkenbaners Hr. D. B. S t e i n m a n - - wnrden alle 
gewonnenen tbeorelisdnn uiid praktisrlini Erkennliiisse der letzlen 
.labre verwertet. Im folgenden sollen knrz einige wesenllidie Merk- 
male dieses groljen Banwerkes gesdiilderl werdeii. 

Die .").% 00(1 t .-diwire Stablkonstrnktion bat eine Gisanilliinge 
von ri730 m. Die 1870 bzw. 1270 in langen Rampen siiid dnrdi I'adi- 
werk-Parallel- Triiger Uberlirii(kt. die siinillidi als Derkbriiiken ans. 
gebildet sind nnd S|ianii«eilen bis zu 170m auf«eisen. Das Kern- 
slii(k bildet die 22r>7 in lange Hiiiigebrii(ke. dereii Kabel nodi um 
je IHTi in weiter bis zum -Ankerblock gefiibrt sind (wegen der dort 



geringeren Wassertiefe), so daB sich sogar eine Lange von 2627 m 
ergibt. Sie iibertrifft die Golden-Gate-Briidie zwar an Gesamtliinge. 
jedoch nieht in bezug anf die Mittelspannweite. Letztere hetragt 
11.19 m (Golden-Gate-Briiike 1280 in). Das Bild der Maikinae- 
Brii(ke ist infolge groljer Einbeitlidikeit sebr ansprediend. Besondere 
Bauaufgaben bradite liereits die Griindung dieser Briitke, die allein 
2.1 iMillionen Dollar versdilang nnd den Einliau von iiber 300 000 m^ 
Beton erforderte. Die Pfeiler niuUten durcb eine Brekziensebidit 
— eine Felsmasse aus verkittelen Gesteinsbroiken — bindurch bis 
auf eine griiBte Tiefe von 62 m nnler dem Wasserspiegel zu dem 
tragenden Bangrund binabgefiibrt werden. Die griilite Wassertiefe 
im Bereidi der HanjitiifTnung betriigt fast 80 m!). 

\ on den insgesaint 34 Pfeilern nnd Endwiderlagern wnrden in 
.Anbetraebt der grolien Wassertiefe nur 24 in unispnndeter Bau- 
grulie erridilet, siebeii Pfeiler steben auf bis zu 30 m langen Stahl- 
pfiiblen nnd bei den drei Pfeilern, die eine Griindungstiefe von 
.'lO bis 60 m unter dem Wasserspiegel baben, wurden einge- 
sdiwonimene Senkbrunnen angewendet. Es sind dies die beiden 
Pfeiler fiir die Pylonen der Hiingehriirke sowie ein weiterer Pfeiler. 
Diese Senkbrunnen mit teils kreisfiirmigem (sielic liild '2i I. lis 




■<?C-. 



Uild 2. Auftbagf^ern eines Senkljruntiens 

reditediigem Grundrili haben Grnndiladien von 14 • 28 m bzw. 
3.1 ra .'Vuljenduri'bniesser und Tiefen bis zu 62 m. Der unterste, etwa 
15 m hohe Absdinitt dieser Brunnen wurde auf einer Schiffswerft 



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A G A Z I N E 

September. 1959 • • 




NEW MEXICO 



MY SON 



His cry of anguish stabhed me like a knife; 
My son. my infant son, with gasping 
breath. 
I ay clinging to the dying spark of life. 
\ child heart faltering at the gate of 
death. 

We watched the candle flicker through the 
night: 
And when the doctor rose and shook 
his head. 
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fight: 
I he world turned black and all mv 
hopes were dead. 

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to One 
Who feels the sorrows of humanilv: 
I pra\ed to Him-Who als^ loved His Son 
.And knew the heart break at f.elh- 
semane 

.And as I praved, the breath of life returned. 

The son I loved came bark from death's 

dark door: 

And then I wept, with pent-up (ears thai 

burned. 

And ga\e my heart (o Him forcicnnorc. 

— D. B. Steinnian 




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Conquest 



A Magazine for Christian Youth 



SEPTEMBER 1959 Volume XIII No. 12 









so UTILE DOST THOU 
ASK OF ME 

By D. B. Steinmon 

How beautiful my garden growrs. 

So grateful for a little care! 
I thrill to see each budding rose 

With fragrance like a thankful prayer. 

A little bird food I supply. 

How joyously the birds repay! 
On topmost boughs against the sky. 

They sing for me all through the day 

I try to do my little part 

To spread some kindliness and cheer: 
As radiant sunshine floods my heart, 

I hear a whisper, God is near! 

O Lord, for all Thy boundless grace. 
So little dost Thou ask of me: 

To make a simple dwelling place, 
A comer in my heart lor Thee! 



MODES AND NATURAL FREQUENCIES OF j. 
SUSPENSION BRIDGE OSCILLATIONS "^^^ ^ 



By 

D. B. STEINMAN 




li 



Reprinted fbom Jouhnal of the Feanklin Institute 
Vol. 268, No. 3, Septembee, 1959 



^.TG 



141 



PENINSULA POETS r 



S 8 



ANTHOLOGY 




THE SONG OF THE BRIDGE 

With hammer-clang on steel and rock 
I sing the song of men who build. 

With strength defying storm and shock 
I sing a hymn of dreams fulfilled. 

I lift my span above the tide 

And stand where wind and wave caress. 
I bear the load so men may ride 

On rainbow road to happiness. 

The light gleams on my strands and bars 
In glory when the sun goes down. 

I lift a net to hold the stars 
And wear the sunset as my crown. 

D. B. Steinman 

In The New York Times 



Copyright 1959 
By the Poetry Society of Michigan 



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THE AUSTRALASIAN ENGINEER 






11 



MIGHTY MAC 

STORY OF THE MACKINAC BRIDGE 
New Book Tells Fascinating Story 



It 



Michigan'? five-mile long Mackinac 
BridEC, affectionately known as "'Mighty 
Mac." i? the longest suspension bridge 
m the world. A new book entitled 
"Mighty Mac — The Official Picture 
History of the Mackinac Bridge" by 
Lawrence A. Rubin, has iust been pub- 
lished by the Wayne State University 
Press (American price $4.95). Mr. 
Rubin was Executive Secretary to the 
Mackinac Bridge Authority. 



"The finest, safest and most beauti- 
ful brid'^p the world has ever >ccn' — 
as the Mackinac Bridge has been des- 
cribed — was officially opened on June 
28th, 1957. 

Since the commencement of con- 
struction in 1953, the great problems 
associated with the construction of this 
bridge, that it had repeatedly been said 
could never be built, have fascinated 
engineers and peo-Ie generally through- 
out the world. 




THE MACKINAC BRIDGE — WORLD'S GREATEST SUSPENSION BRIDGE 

Length from anchorage to anchorage, 8614 fe«t; height, 552 feet; cost 99,800,000 
dollars. Designed by Dr. D. B. Steinman. 



The Governor of Michigan, in his 
foreword, says: "This bridge across the 
straits of Mackinac ranks with the 
Pyramids, the great hydro-electric dams, 
the skyscrapers of Manhattan and the 
Panama and Suez Ginals. as one of the 
nu)st wondrous works of the hand and 
brain of man. 

"For generations man dreamed ol a 
land route across the straits of Mack- 
inac, a route which would constitute a 
new north-west passage from the great 
cities of mid-America to the American 
and Canadian north-west. Today, 
through the faith, the will and the 
determination of the people of Michi- 
gan, that dream is a reality." 

The Worlds' Greatest 

Rising to a height of 55 2 feet above 
the straits "Mighty Mac" stretches to 
an overall length of 8614 feet from 
main anchorage to main anchorage, its 
nearest competitor being the Golden 
Gate Bridge with 6450 feet. The 
George Washington Bridge spans 4600 
feet and the Brooklyn Bridge 3468.5 
feet 

The bridge was designed by that 
great American bridge-builder. Dr. D. 
B. Steinman and a feature of the book 
is Dr. Steinman's special chapter on 
the design of the bridge, which he re- 
gards as his crown achievement. [See 
page 47.} We publish herewith this 
chapter in toto, as it graphically des- 
cribes all the major problems and the 
features of the bridge from start to 
finish. 

Extensively Photographed 

The construction was extensively 
photographed under the auspices of the 
Mackinac Bridge Authority by Herm 
Ellis and his assistants and altogether 
some 3,000 black-and-white photo- 
graphs and 1.000 clour transparencies 
were taken durini» the various con- 
struction phases. Likewise, another 
1400 feet of 16mm. film was taken for 
motion-picture documentary purpose*. 

The book is consequently generously 
illustrated with 204 fine photograph*, 
from the initial pinpointing of the 
rreri-ie location on the water to the 
brilliant displays of fireworks during 
the four-day celebration* marking the 
dedication of the bridge. 

While paying tribute to the engineer 
and builders of the bridge, great recog- 
nition must also be given to Senator 
Brown and his colleagues, who labour- 
ed so diligently to arrange the necessary 
finance which was carried out by 
$99,800,000 worth of Mackinac Bridge 
Authority Bonds. 



Mari4i 7, I05Q 



Consu king 

Engineer 



S 8 



New Thousand Islands Bridge 

A second span is being added to the International 
Rift Bridge, one of the five bridges of the Thousand 
Island International Bridge crossing the St. Lawrence 




^ew bridge, foreground, wiU speed one-way traffic 
between the American and Canadian customs offices. 



River. D. B. Steinman, New York consulting en- 
gineer, has designed the new 90-ft reinforced con- 
crete structure and a reinforced concrete pump and 
transformer house on one shore between the two 
bridges. Completion date is scheduled for July 1959. 



4- 



March 1959 





Ransom 



Wilbu 



MacLtish (left) and Holmes 





Sandburg 



Ciardi 



A Distinguished 
Lecture Series 



DURING 1958-59 Tufts University 
is presenting a series of public 
readings, known as the Steinman 
Poetry Lectures, by five of America's 
best poets. The series has been made 
possible through the generosity of 
David B. Steinman, the eminent de- 
signer and builder of bridges, and 
himself a writer as well as a patron of 
poetry. Mr. Steinman's best-known 
bridge is perhaps the Mackinac 
Bridge, connecting the Michigan pen- 
insulas, which was depicted on a 
three-cent stamp last summer. It is 
the longest suspension bridge in the 
world. Mr. Steinman has built and 
designed more than 400 bridges on 
five continents, and has won count- 
less honors, including the Scientific 
Research Society's highest award for 
his research and inventions in sus- 
pension bridge aerodynamics. 

Archibald MacLeish, the first poet 
in the series, provided a moving and 
inspiring evening for a capacitv crowd 
in Cohen Auditorium on October 20. 
Introduced Ijy Tufts Professor John 
Holmes as "our outstanding man of 



letters and public life," Mr. Mac- 
Leish prefaced his readings, which 
covered the range of his work, with 
informal and piquant remarks which 
heightened the meaning and effect 
of each of his selections. Many in the 
audience, visibly afl"ected by the po- 
et's insight, personality, and master- 
ful presentation, took advantage of 
the opportunity to meet Mr. Mac- 
Leish at the reception following his 
reading in .'Mumnae Hall. 

On Dec. 3, John Crowe Ransom, 
great teacher and critic, continued 
the series on the same high level. Mr. 
Ransom has been Carnegie professor 
of poetry at Kenyon College in Ohio 
since 1937. There he founded the 
Kenyon School of Criticism, out of 
which grew the phase of modern 
criticism popularly known as "the 
new criticism," which studies poetry's 
logic and texture. His total output of 
poetry is small, but it has powerfully 
influenced other poets. A charming 
and disarming Southerner, Mr. Ran- 
som's reading of his poems was de- 
lightful and rewarding. 



Richard Wilbur will be the third 
of the Steinman poets, coming to 
Cohen Auditorium on February 16 
at 8:00 p.m. The youngest poet in the 
series, he is looked up to by those 
poets younger than he, and admired 
by those older. His third book, "Things 
of This World," won the Pulitzer 
prize and the National Book Award 
in 1957. An .-Xmherst graduate, he 
has taught at Harvard and Wellesley, 
and is now professor of English at 
\\'esleyan University. 

The fourth poet will be Carl Sand- 
burg. The man who has given us Lin- 
coln helped open a new era in 
American poetry, with his Clhicago 
poems, in 1914, and is known and 
read and loved everywhere. He will 
read his poems, and sing a few songs, 
on March 18, introduced by Professor 
Holmes. Carl Sandburg received an 
honorary degree from the hands of 
President Wessell in June, 1 955, with 
.Arthur Anderson, President of the 
Board of Trustees, looking on hap- 
pily. Mr. Sandburg looks forward, he 
sa\s, to seeing Tufts again, and his 
friends, the two great .Swedes. Tufts 
looks forward to hearing Carl Sand- 
burg, whose unforgettable \oice, 
reading and singing, is itself an 
-American experience. 

John Cliardi, Tufts '38, is the fifth 
of the Steinman poets, and will be 
presented I)y his former teacher. Pro- 



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X. TG 140 
. S 8 

-:^aTTuary 22, T959 



NEWSRECORD 




New Bridge to Canada Coming 



iMigincering rcconiniciKlatioiis for :i 
long-sought bridge to connect the U. S. 
iind Oniada at Sault Ste. Marie (Mielu- 
gan and Ontario) call for IZ.OOO ft of 
bridge and approaches. 

riie toll crossing \vo\ikl carr\ two 
1+ft traffic lanes and two 2-ft walkwa\s. 
Cost IS estimated at SIS nnllion. 

The U. S. section would include two 
main spans, each 4i0 ft long, with 
two ZOO-ft-long end s|)ans. The Canad- 
ian side would lia\c one 4^n-ft-long 
main s|ian and two 2(l(l-ft long end 
sj)ans. 

I Irsc main structures arc to bridge 



the Ameficau and Canadian ship canals. 
Lessers spans will cross the U. S. power 
canal and the St. Marv's River rapids. 
River spans would ' total 4.810 ft. 
.American approaches would be 4, 14^5 
ft long; Canadian approaches, s,045 ft. 

Ihc re]3ort was prepared by D. B. 
Steinman. New York City consulting 
engineer. It is being studied by the 
International Bridge .\uthoritv. a bod\ 
created b\ the State of Michigan and 
subscribed to b\ the Ontario interests. 

riie authoritx' is also investigating 
methods of financing the crossing, and a 
rc]3ort is due in a mouth or two. 



ES CANADA 
DAILY PRESS 



Escanaba, Michigan, Thursday, January 8, 1959 



X . TG 140 
. S 8 



Steinman Plan For Soo 
Bridge is Recommended 



DETTROrr (AP) — Construction 
et the proposed $18,196,000 Inter- 
national Bridge at the Soo as a 
two lan«, 12,000 foot long structure 
— counting approaches — wa* rec- 
ommended Wednesday. 

In an engineering report to the 
three governmental agencies con- 
cerned, David B. Steinman, New 
York consulting engineer and de- 
signer, proposed two 14-iftx)t traffic 
lanes and 2-foot emergency walk- 
ways on both sides. 

Tht river spans carrying the 
roadway over the Amnerican and 
Canadian ship canals, the power 
eaoal oq the U.S. side and the 
St. Mary's river rapids would to- 
tal 4,810 feet in length. 

The approaches on the American 
side would cover 4,145 feet and 
on the Canadian side 3,046 feet. 
Toll plazas would be in addition 
to these dimensions. 

Steinman, designer of the Mack- 
inac and other famous bridges, 
proposed the crossing be located 
just east of the existing railroad 
bridge across the river. 

His detailed recommendations 
were presented at a meeting ol 



Michigan and Ontario highway of- 
ficials with members of the In- 
ternational Bridge Authority. 

Hie plans called for 67 piers. 
The crossing would be effected 
through shallow water of 20 foot 
maximum depth, l^e piers would 
be founded in sandstone rock. 

Steinman estimated it would 
take 18 months for actual con- 
struction. He estimated operation 
and maintenance costs at $325,000 
a year. 

The report took note of the pos- 
sible alternative of constructing a 
4,805 foot tunnel in making the 
international traffic link. 

The cost of a tunnel was esti- 
mated at $27,500,000. Construction 
time was estimated at 36 months 
and maintenance and operation 
costs at $475,000 a year. 

Under the bridge plan, the toll 
plaza Qii the American end would 
be situated adjacent to Pine Street 
between Easterday and Ravine 
streets in Sault Ste. Marie. The 
structure would swing north in 
a gentle S curve to the river 
spans. 



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X. TG 140 
. S 8 



BnickcMi iiiit j»ro(>en Spannweiteii 

\ On 
D. B. Steinman, l5era(oii(l«'r lii^eiiieiir. iN'ew \ ork Cilv 



/hatiohalX 
/society of \ 
professional 
^engineers/ 

(QUNDtO I93'» 



. S 8 



Introduction of Past President David B. Steinman at Past Presidents' 
Luncheon, Silver Anniversary Meeting, June 20, 1959, New York City. 



It is fitting that we should climax this recognition of the 
past leaders of our Society during the last twenty-five years with 
recognition of the founder of NSPE. Will Dr. David B. Steinman and 
Mrs. Steinman please stand? 

In the spring of 1934, David B. Steinman requested 
representatives of the New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and 
Connecticut Societies of Professional Engineers to meet with him to 
discuss plans for the formation of a new national engineering organization. 
When the engineers representing these four state societies met with Dr. 
Steinman at the Columbia University Club, they decided on the basic 
principles still governing this Society. They were: (1) Membership 
would be restricted to registered professional engineers; (2) EVery 
member of the National Society would also be a member of his state 
society and his local chapter; (3) The National Society would be an 
individual -member organization, not merely a federation of state 
societies; (4) The Society would devote its entire energies to the non- 
technical phases of engineering common to all types of engineers, both 
by training and employment. 

They met again on September 3, 1934, at which time 
a Constitution was adopted and a set of officers was elected. The 
first vice president was Major G. W, Batten of Pennsylvania, the second 
vice president Colonel Hugh A. Kelley of New Jersey, the treasurer was 
Willard S. Conlon of Connecticut, and the executive secretary appointed 
at that time was T. Keith Legare of South Carolina. The Society wisely 
chose David B. Steinman as the first president of NSPE. The first official 
meeting of the Society's board of directors was held in New York on 
March 15, 1935; and the Society has continued to flourish since that time. 
During Dr. Steinman' s tenure as president of NSPE in 1935 and '36, he 
visited many of the states in the union, addressing engineering groups on 
the values of professionalism and the need for a three-level, individual- 
membership organization with high standards of nnembership, devoting 
its energies toward developing engineering as a profession. The seeds 
he planted immediately took root and sprouted, bearing fruit within a 
few months in many areas. In other states the seeds lay dormant for 
a number of years. Twenty-five years after these propitious beginnings 
the Society has matured to where it now has fifty affiliated state societies, 
nearly 400 local chapters in all major areas of engineering employment, 
and over 50,000 individual members. 



MICHIGA 



EEK MAY 17-23 



mtlTUt rtMMTtMt MT 



UCIMMU or MTMi BM 



0« UyRIHOM MT 



IMMMNHMT 



iXSML 
gu imnuf MT 



:jl. 



an fa«n«M. Mr 



IM THIMK: 
niOOMCTt or mCHiGAN 



mil cMmmn orrm 
III nmm i. lutON mhlmm 

UUtllNt. MKHIBtN 




MACKINAC BRIDGE DESIGNER Dr. David Steimnan, the distinguished 
WRITES MICHIGAN WEEK POEM designer of the Mackinac bridge and 

other famous spans around the world, 
has shown his affection for Michigan by writing a poem, "Michigan the 
Beautiful" especially for Michigan Week. The poem will be presented 
to the public during the Week in some special manner to be determined by 
President Harlan Hatcher of the U. of M. as chairman of the Cultural Ac- 
tivities Board of Michigan Week. 

Not only that, but Dr. Steinman has written us 
that he will fly a Michigan flag from his office 
window in New York throughout Michigan Week. 



X. TG 140 
S 8 



(Weekty devoted ezdusiydy to the recording and the promotion of Franco-American cultural activiti^) 



Jeudi, le 2 juillet 1959 



• y^ ^y^ A^A A^fc i9^. j9^.j9 ^. ^9.^.^9^. j^^^^^^^^.^^^. ^9^. i 9^.j9 ^.j 9.^ ^w .^. ^ w.^ j^^. j^ *. ^^^ ^^^.^^^^^fc^^^^- 

Special pour «Le Travailleur* 

Poesie americaine 



Petite anthologie de poetes contemporains 
hdbiU6s en frangais par 

Rosaire Dion-L^vesque 

• « • 

A L A FRA NCE 

Quelle est done ta. magie, 6 France 

Charmant nos coeurs d'une romance? 

Tu vets d'amour et de chansons 

Ce printemps qiie nous souhaitions ; 

Tes brises deuces, ton soleU 

A nos reVes donnent I'eveil. 

Art et Beaute sont ton essence 

Tu donnes au monde, un coeur. France! 

Et quoi de ta flamme d'espoir 

Illuminant un del trop noir? 

Tes grands guerriers furent de taille 

A dominer toute bataille; 

Et ton drapeau flotte. exalte, 

Au ciel de la fratemite. 

Notre reve est de cette essence 

Donnant un coeur au monde, 6 France! 

D. R STEINMAN 

(Ing4mew de profession, M. 
Steinman habile New York City. 
Le po^me que voici est extrait 
de "The American Bard", avec 
I'cuitorisation persormelle 
de I'auteur. R. D.-L.) 



hum 



X. T6 141 
. S 8 



May-Jime 1959 



The Harp 

^^Irive stories high above a city street 
He dwelt, a child with wonder in his eyes. 
For him, through winter cold and summer heat, 
The sunbeams danced and stars sang lullabies. 

One day, as if on wings, a stranger came 
And stood within the room, unheralded. 
Gently he spoke, calling the boy by name: 
"David, play on your harp!" he softly said. 

How did the stranger guess the secret dream 
That, day and night, within the child's heart burned? 
Outside the window, in the sunset gleam. 
Glittered the instrument for which he yearned: 

A bridge ! The cables swung across the bay. 
The strands that hummed like harp-strings murmuring. 
They whispered to the child, "Some day. . Some day. . " 
"There is my harp, sir. I can hear it sing!" 

- D.B. Steinman 



A -.■ 



^' TG 140 
• S 8 



Wisconsin 
Poetry Magazine 



July - August, 1959 



MICHIGAN THE BEAUTIFUL 

^lllll'ichigan the Beautiful! 

2/1^ Paradise the red man knew, 

Where the deer still range the greenwood 

And the lakes reflect the blue. 

Michigan the Beautiful! 
Where the smoke of campfires curled, 
Now a thousand wheels are humming 
Day and night to serve the world. 

Michigan the Beautiful! 
Haven of the heart's desire; 
Smiling farms and gleaming cities 
Keep alight our Freedom's fire. 

Michigan the Beautiful! 
Land of forest, lake and stream, 
Home of sturdy pioneers, 
Builders of the Western Dream. 



-David B. Steinman 



Evening News 



9i 



Wm Honor 
Dr. Steinman 

SYRACUSE, N. Y.-Dr. David 
B. Steinman, internationally Itnown 
bridge engineer, will be one of six 
prominent men in tlie fields of in- 
dustry, education, theology and 
science to be awarded an honorary 
degree at Syracuse University's 
105th Commencement, June 1. 

Dr. Steinman, who will receive 
a Doctor of Engineering degree, 
has been designing or consulting 
engineer in the construction of 
more than 440 bridges on five con- 
tinents, including the world's larg- 
est bridge project, the $100,000,000 
Mackinac Bridge, Michigan. 

He has received eight artistic 
bridge awards for the most beauti- 
ful bridges in America. Among the 
most notable of his bridges are the 
suspension bridge at Florianapolls, 
Brazil; Carquinez Straits Bridge, 
Calif.; St. John's Bridge, Portland, 
Ore.; Henry Hudson Bridge, Thou- 
sand Islands International Bridge. 

During his 39 years of private 
practice. Dr. Steinman has become 
a recognized authority on long-span 
bridges, the design of suspension 
bridges and aerodynamic analysis 
of suspension bridges. His inven- 
tions and improvements have con- 
tributed greatly to bridge design 
and construction. 

Recipient of 350 honors. Dr. 
Steinman holds the highest award 
of the Scientific Research Society 
of America for his research and in- 
ventions in suspension bridge aan- 
dynamics and the Kimbrougb Gold 
Medal, highest award of the Amer> 
ican Institute of Steel Construe- 
tion. 



X. TG 140 
, S 8 



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• 



A I>eam, A Song, A Prayer 

D. B. STEINMAN 

A bridge of strength and grace in mystic blend 
Embodies spirit treasures that transcend 
The steel and stone. The builder's dream is there, 
Each curve a song, each soaring line a prayer. 
A dream, a song, a prayer — these three combine 
To make the bridge a beacon and a shrine. 
So with our lives, Builder of our Span 
Help us to weave these strands into Thy plan 
In threefold blend: a dream to point the goal; 
A song to lift the heart; a prayer, the soul! 

JANUARY, 1959 



REPRINT FROM 

QIVII. IMNUMRY 1959 




X . TG 140 

. S 8 



fc 



ENGINEERI 



rjsrr mmgazmnb or emginssbed cons: 



I 



\mM 




MACKINAC STRAITS BRIDOB. 
span 3,800 H., dadloated Junm 1SBS 
See articles by Stelnman, 
Oronqulst, «Jeyo», London. 

TABIC Of CONTENTS, PAGE 3 




^^ *.' ^^ 



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^ 



V'J^J 









X.TG HO 
. C 8 



COLUMBIA 

engineering alMinni limes 




JUNE— JULY 1959 



The Class Notebook 

1909 — The David B. Steinman Festival of Arts was held 
for a second year at St. Lawrence University in Canton, 
New Yark during the month of March. This Festival, 
sponsored by one of our active Engineering alumni, has 
been enthusiastically received not only by St. Lawrence 
University but also by the residents of the surrounding 
area. 



ENGINEERING 
NEWSRECORD 



:n^ 



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D. B. Steinman: What measure for this man? 



MICHIGAN COLLEGE OF MINING AND lECHNOLOGY 

HOUGHTON'MICHIGAN y -rp.,, 

FRANK KEREKES 

DEAN OF THE FACULTY . $ g 

July 2, 1959 



RECKI VED 

Dr. D. B. Steinman JUL > -"^ 

Consulting Engineer 

117 Liberty Street D. B. S'JFJNiVIAI^j 

New York, New York 

Dear Dave: 

"What Measure for This Man?" in Engineering-News Record, 
June 25, 1959i vividly brings to my mind the many personal 
contacts it has been my privilege to have with you since the 
Summer of 1925 when I was employed as a bridge computer by 
you. 

Your intense and high devotion to the advancement of bridge 
engineering as an art, a science, and an engineering adventure 
founded upon your equally high standards of professional 
responsibility are in my mind the measure of your outstanding 
contributions not only to civil engineering, to these United 
States of America, but to the world. In all these high achieve- 
ments you have been guided by humanitarian motives and 
ideals. Thus, I add my humble tribute to a great engineer and 
a great person and a great humanitarian. 

Sincerely yours, 

Frank Kerekes 
FK/mfr 



X. TG 140 

. S 8 



the 
formative years 



NSPE 

1934-1959 

A QUARTER OF A CENTURY 

OF PROFESSIONAL 

GROWTH 




THE National Society of Professional Engineers was 
founded in 1934. Its organizational impetus grew 
out of an increasing desire on the part of a growing num- 
ber of engineers for a profession-wide engineering group, 
as distinct from the existing engineering societies which 
drew their membership from one specialized field. 

Invitations to discuss such a profession-wide society 
were extended by Dr. David B. Steinman, world- 
renowned bridge designer, and on May 25, 1934, repre- 
sentatives from the New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, 
and Connecticut state engineering societies met in the 
Memorial Room of the Columbia University Club in 
New York City to consider the formation of the National 
Society of Professional Engineers. 

The structure of the proposed organization, as out- 
lined by Temporary Chairman Steinman, was to include 
restriction of membership to registered professional engi- 
neers, and a three-level participation in which each mem- 
ber would be a member of the National Society, his state 
society, and his local chapter. 

A second organizational conference of the new 
group was held in New York City on September 3, 1934. 
In the preamble to the National Society constitution 
adopted at that meeting can be seen the basic concept of 
service upon which the NSPE program has been erected: 

Recognizing that service to society, to state, and 
to profession is the premise upon which individual 
opportunity must be built, the National Society of 
Professional Engineers does herewith dedicate it- 
self to the promotion and protection of the profes- 
sion of engineering as a social and economic 
influence vital to the affairs of men and of these 
United States. 

Before this second organizational meeting adjourned, 
Dr. Steinman was elected as the first NSPE president. His 
fellow officers were Major T. W. Battin, Pennsylvania, 
1st vice president; Col. Hugh A. Kelly, New Jersey, 2nd 
vice president; and Willard S. Conlon. Connecticut, treas- 
urer. T. Keith Legare, South Carolina, was appointed 
executive secretary. On December 10, 1934, the National 
Society of Professional Engineers was incorporated in 
South Carolina as a nonprofit organization. 




David B. Steinman 
First President of NSPE 
1934-1936 



tEPib^ 



X. TG 140 
. S 8 



^tivait 0ttt H^m 



THURSDAY, MAY 7, 1959 



CONTEST ON 



Did You Snap Big Mac? 



SI'. IGNACEJ— Photographera 
wishing to enter the $1,000 prize 
contest for architectural pijoto- 
graphs of the Mackinac Bridge 
have only until June i to get 
Into the swim. 

First prize is $500. There will 
also be a second prize of $250, 
two third prizes of $50 each and 
six fourth prizes of $25 each. 

Dr. David B. Steinraan, famed 
designer of the Mackinac Bridge 
IS the donor. 

* • • 

DRAMATIC photographs fea- 



turing the suspension span are 
desired. No boats, vetiicles, or 
people should be prominent in 
the foreground. 

Taking phetographs from the 
bridge deck will not be per- 
hiitted. 

All entries, which must be 
unmounted 8x10 glossy prints, 
should be addressed to Photo 
Contest, Mackinac Bridge Au- 
thority, St. Ignace, Michigan, 
and must be postmarked before 
midnight, June 1, 1959. 

Winners will be announced 
June 30, 1959. 



Here's Another: 
Deadline June 1 

ST. IGNACE — Deadline for 
entries in the $1,000 Macklnap 
Bridge photo contest has been 
extended to June 1, 1959. 

The original deadline waa 
Nov. 1. 1958, but officials de- 
cided contestants might need 
more time since painting ha« 
been completed on the towers. 

Prinu must be black and 
white, 8x10, glossy, unmounted 
First prize la $500; second, 
$250; third, two of $50 eaoh 
and six fourth, $25. 

Entries must be addresaad 
to: Photo Contest, Macklmtt 
Bridge Authority, SL Ignace. 
Mich., before midnight June I, 
1959. Winnera will ba an- 
nounced June SO, 1969. 



\\ 



CIVIL 
ENGINEERING 



X. TG 140 
. S 8 



JUNE 1989 



ASCE Prizes and Awards Are Announced by Board 

Ernest E. Howard Award 

David B. Stbinman, M. ASCE, "for his 
signal contribution towards the advance- 
ment of bridge analysis and design, to 
the theory of the suspension bridge and 
its aerodynamic stability, and especially 
for his outstanding work in the design 
of the Mackinac Bridge." 



iNEws or engineers! 



D. B. Steinman at the honors convo- 
cation at Hunter College in New York 
City on April 29 was presented with the 
President's Gold Medal for Distinguished 
Service. On June 1 Syracuse University 
will award Dr. Steinman, internationally 
known bridge engineer, the honorary de- 
gree of doctor of engineering, his twen- 
tieth doctorate. 




X. TG 140 
. S 8 



Clje ^meritan parb 



Night-Blooming Water Lily 

Lily, refulgent in petals of white, 
Fair ballerina, enchanting the night. 
Kissed by the moonlight, you slowly unfold 
Beauty, in bodice of velvet and gold. 

Motionless . . . quivering . . . held in a 

trance . . 
Dew-spangled, twinkling like stars in your 

dance. 
Raptured, you sway to the nightingale's 

tune. 
Turning your face to your lover, the moon. 
New York — David B. Steinman 



July, August, September, 19^9 



. S 8 



Book Provides More Inland SeaTLore 




MICraCAX WRITER TELLS XEW STORY OF BRIDGE, DESIGNER 



THE BAY CITY TIMES 



JULY 17. 1959 



ESCANABA 
DAILY PRESS 



X. TG 140 

. S 8 



TUESDAY, JULY 7, 1959^ 




THIS PICTURE, of the world's greatest bridge was worth five 
hundred dollars to Ronald J. Wilson, St. Ignace, first prize win- 
ner in Mackinac Bridge photo contest sponsored by Dr. D. B. 
Steinman, famed designer of the structure. Wilson made the 
photograph with a Leica M-3 camera, on panatomic-x film. Sec- 
ond prize of two hundred fifty dollars and a third prize of fifty 
dollars were both won by Harold Bell, a Lansing professional 
photographer. The six winners of fourth prizes of twenty five 
dollars were: Jack M. Richards, Fcrndale: Paul Ihde, Menominee; 
Maury Strahl, East Lansing: Jack M. Richards, Ferndale; Don 
Millard, Port Huron; and Harry Erickson, Muskegon. 



X. TG 140 
. S 8 



JOURNAL 

OF THE 'Z— - 

AMERICAN 
CONCRETE 

INSTITUTE JUNE 1959 



Steinman honored by 
Hunter and Syracuse 

At the honors convocation at Hunter 
College in New York City on April 29, the 
President's Gold Medal for distinguished 
service, was presented to David B. Steinman, 
internationally famous bridge engineer. 

At commencement ceremonies at Syracuse 
University on June 1, the honorary degree 
of Doctor of Engineering was conferred on 
Dr. Steinman. This is his 20th honorary 
degree. 



ENGINEERING 
NEWS RECORD 



X. TG 140 

. S 3 



August 20, 1959 



International 




Trussed Arch Will Span Indus 



The Government of Pakistan will call 
for world-wide bids on September 18 
for construction of a steel truss arch 
railroad bridge over the Rohn Channel 
of the Indus River near Sukkur. 

The bridge will have a span of 806 
ft, 9 in. between end pins. Tlie rise of 
the bottom rib will be 180 ft and the 
distance between the two ribs at the 
crown will be 24 ft. 

It will be the ninth longest steel arch 
in the world, according to its designer, 
D. B. Steinman, New York City con- 
sulting engineer. 

Mr. Steinman estimates that the 
bridge will cost $3 million and take 



20 months to erect. It will be paid for 
from funds allocated by the Interna- 
tional Bank for Reconstruction and 
De\'elopnient for the rehabilitation of 
Pakistan's railroad system. 

Although designed as a railroad 
bridge, the new Rorhl Channel span 
will ha\e a concrete deck, flush with 
the rails, that can carry motor traffic 
in time of emergency. S{)eci<ications 
call for the use of British Standard steel. 

The new bridge will be erected 100 
ft downstream from the 70-year-old 
Lansdowne Bridge and replace it for 
railway traffic. 



Men and Jobs 

Honors 

Ray M. Boynton has been awarded 
the honorary degree of Doctor of Engi- 
neering by the Uni\ersity of Maine. 
A graduate of the university, he has 
been for 30 years an associate of Dr. 
D. B. Steinman, consulting engineer. 
New York City, Dr. Boynton designed 
and super\ised the substructure and 
main towers of the Mackinac Straits 
Bridge, Michigan, Sukkur Arch Bridge, 
Pakistan, and the Bosporus Suspension 
Bridge, Turkey. 





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NEWS BRIEFS 



New Bridge Over 
Soo Canal Planned 

Engineering recommendations for a 
long-discussed bridge to connect the 
United States and Canada (Michigan 
and Ontario) at Sault Ste. Marie have 
been prepared by D. B. Steinman, 
M.ASCE, New York City consulting en- 
gineer. The proposal is being studied by 
Michigan and Ontario highway officials 
and the International Bridge Authority, 
a body created by the State of Michigan. 

The plan calls for a two-lane, 12,000- 
ft-long structure (counting approaches) 
with 2-ft emergency walkways on both 
sides. The river spans carrying the road- 
way over the American and Canadian 
ship canals would total 4,810 ft in length. 
The approaches on the American side 
would cover 4,165 ft, and on the Cana- 
dian side 3,045 ft. The crossing would 
require 67 piers, to be founded in sand- 
stone rock. Maximum water depth is 20 
ft. The bridge would cost $18,198,000, and 
require eighteen months for construction. 

The report considered the possible al- 
ternative of a 4,805-ft tunnel in making 
the international traffic connection. The 
cost of such a tunnel was estimated at 
$27,5(X),000, and construction time was 
put at thirty-six months. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING • May 1959 



^^8 



A Message from 

Pres. Dunn on NSPE's 

Silver Anniversary 



A QL^ARTER of a century ago a small group 
of engineers gathered in the Memorial Room of the 
Columbia L'niversity Club in Xew York City to con- 
sider the formation of the National Society of Pro- 
fessional Engineers. Few at that meeting could have 
realized the immense growtli that lay ahead for both 
the Society they were founding and the engineering 
profession as a whole. Today we can look out on an 
XSPE membership of some 50,000 engineers in fifty 
state societies and nearly 100 local chapters. The Na 
tional Society has its headquarters in its own ijuilding 
in Washington, D. C. Nearly S.'J.OOO copies of this 
magazine are printed and circidated each month. 
Other NSPE publications on a variety of topics are 
regidarly distributed to industrial executives, educa- 
tional people, government officials, antl individual 
engineers. 

Such a listing of the physical "eciuipment" ol 
the National Society could go on and on for several 
pages. Hut nnich more important, I believe, is a list- 
ing which would show the dedication to the c()n(e|)t 
of service which has always been in the background 
of NSPE activities. This concejJt is jjcrhaps expiesseil 
most adequately in the preamble to the National So- 
ciety Constitution adopted in the second organiza- 
tional meeting of the NSPE founders in 19.')l: 

"Recognizing that service to society, to state, antl to 
profession is the premise upon which individual 
opportimity must be built, the Xatioual Society ol 
Professional Engineers does herewith dedicate itsell 
to the promotion and protection ol the piolession 
of engineering as a social and econtjmic inlluenee 
\ital to the affairs of men and of these United 
States." 

The best yardstick of the National Society's ac- 



complislimeiits over the jiast twenty-ll\e years would 
be a comparison of the extent to which these accom- 
jjlishments measine up to the ideals of service as called 
foi in the abo\e (piotation. 

Dl'RING this Silver Anniversary year, we might 
ask ouisehes uhat lies ahead for the next tpiarter ol 
a centmy of NSPE growth and development. The 
answers to this (|uestion may in laige part depend on 
how nuuh inliuence vve are al)le to l)ring to l)ear on 
the \()iinger generation now in the engineering 
schools. For it is, of coinse, these yoiuig engineers 
who nuist shoidder the lesjjonsiljility of building up- 
on the loundation of professionalism vvhich has now 
been erected. 

I.\ the first issue of the A.\iiric:an Encim fr maga- 
zine in [aiuiary, I'J.'iS, Dr. D. B. Steinman, first 
.\SPE president, wrote an article in which he stated 
that "the idtimate scojje of potential accomplishment 
of the National Society transcends present realiza- 
tion." I feel that this statement is just as \alicl today 
as we look towaiil the next twenty-five years. Engi- 
neering and the sciences have changed the face of the 
earth and aie now altering the composition oi the 
space around oiu planet. The golden niniixersary of 
the National Soc ietv will sinely be observed at a time 
when engineering achievements will have transpoited 
ntan c)ut into the solar system and bevond. 

Lee it be our hope and j)raver, then, that the 
individuals who are chaiged with the icsponsihilitv 
of guiding National Society policv and activity 
through the next geneiation will hold themselves un- 
swervingly to the task of building for the kind of 
profession whic li will lace ujj to the challenges of the 
times. 



The American Engineer 



June 1959 






MICHIGAN WEEK OFFICE 

110 Stevens T. Mason Building 

Lansing, Michigan - May 14, 1959 



LANSING, MAY 14 



One of the world's foremost bridge designers. Dr. 



D. B, Steinman, the man who designed the Mackinac bridge which links Michigan's two 
peninsulas, and many other structures in various parts of the world, has given 
Michigan a fine gift for its Michigan Week celebration starting Sunday, May 17. The 
gift is his poem, "Michigan The Beautiful," in which he shows that his love of beauty 
is carried out in the structures he designs, and in the wonders of nature, of which 
Michigan has such a bountiful amount. 

A resident of New York City, Dr. Steinman has spent considerable time in 
Michigan and his poem reveals the impressions he has received from the joys of 
nature and the humming wheels of industry in this state. 

Following is Dr. Steinman' S poem, made puDlic on the eve of Michigan Week. 



MICHIGAN THE BEAUTIFUL 
By D. B. Steinman 



Michigan the Beautiful! 

Paradise the red man knew, 

V?here the deer still range the greenwood 

And the lakes reflect the blue. 

Michigan the Beautiful'. 
Where the smoke of campfires curled, 
Now a thousand wheels are humming 
Day and night to serve the world. 



Michigan the Beautiful I 
Haven of the heart's desire; 
Smiling farms and gleaming cities 
Keep alight our Freedom's fire. 

Michigan the Beautiful I 
Land of forest, lake and stream, 
Home of sturdy pioneers, 
Builders of the Western Dream. 



■u- 



MV; 9.5:27 




Commencement 1959 



Honorary Degrees 



DAVID BARNARD STEINMAN, bridge 
builder on five continents, inventor, scientist, 
and mathematician, educator, prolific contributor 
to knowledge, and gifted poet, you are an ex- 
ample of the possibilities of the full life for all 
who can and will live it. 

Having taken your Bachelor of Science degree 
"summa cum laude" at the City College of New 
York and your Civil Engineer, Master of Arts and 
Ph.D. degrees at Columbia, and having served as 
Professor of Civil Engineering at the University 
of Idaho and as Profef.sor of Civil and Mechanical 
Engineering at City College, you went into pri- 
vate practice in 1920. Since that year, you have 
been designing or consulting engineer in the 
construction of more than four hundred and 
forty bridges — among them, the Florianopolis 
Bricige in Brazil, which is the largest in South 
America; the Mount Hope Bridge in Rhode Is- 
land, the St. John's Bridge in Oregon, the Car- 
quinex Straits Bridge in California, the Henry 
Hudson Bridge in New York, the Constitution 
Bridge in Puerto Rico, the Thousand Islands In- 
ternational Bridge, the Baghdad Bridge over the 
Tigris River in Iraq, the Kingston Bridge acros', 
the Hudson River, the Raritan River Bridge in 
New Jersey, and the Connecticut Turnpike Bridge 
in New Haven. And you have recently completed 
another international bridge, that over the St. 
Lawrence Seaway, as well as the world's largest 
bridge, the MacKinac Bridge in .Michigan. You 
a'-e now engaged on plans for an international 
bridge at Saulte Sainte Marie and for an inter- 
continental bridge over the Bosporus, as well as 
for a long-span steel-arch bridge in Pakistan. 



You are the author of a number of standaru 
books on bridge design and construction as well 
as of the biographical work The Builders of the 
Bridge, and author, also of more than six hun- 
dred technical papers and inspirational articles. 
Furthermore, an accomplished poet, you have 
published two volumes of verse and have seen 
your poems printed in many periodicals of na- 
tional or international circulation. .\nd you have 
promoted the cause of poetry by founding visit- 
ing-poets series at four universities as well as by 
serving as an officer of the Poetry Society of 
.\merica and similar organizations. As founder 
and president of the David B. Steinman Foun- 
dation, you have provided grants for research, 
education, and student aid. 

For your far reaching achievements, you have 
earned many and diverse honors. Eight of your 
bridges have won the annual award for the most 
beautiful in America. You have twice received the 
Norman Medal, the highest award of the Ameri- 
can Society of Civil Engineers; and, in 1952 and 
1954, the highest awards of the National Society 
of Professional Engineers and of the Scientific 
Research Society of .America. .American and for- 
eign universities have given you honorary de- 
grees, while other tributes, too numerous for 
mention, have been paid to you both in our 
country and abroad. 

And now. by action of the University Senate, 
the Board of Trustees concurring, and by virtue of 
the authority vested in me by the University of 
the State of New York, I confer upon you the 
degree of Doctor of Engineering, honoris causa. 



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"Mighty Mat'' Truly an Immovable Objett 




THE ALPENA NEWS, Tuesday, April 14, 1959 







KINGS COUNTY 

PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER 



MAY, 1959 



DR. STEINMAN AGAIN HONORED 

Dr. Steinman who holds honorary doc- 
torates in Science, Engineering, Litera- 
ture, Humanities, and Laws from leading 
universities in three continents, will be 
the recipient of yet another honorary de- 
gree of Doctor of Engineering at the 
Commencement Ceremonies of Syracuse 
University on June 1, 1959. This will be 
the Doctor's twentieth honorary degree. 

The noted philanthropist and bridge 
builder, whose endowments for engineer- 
ing scholarships have endeared him to the 
engineering profession, has recently sub- 
mitted his design for the $18,198,000 
International Bridge at Soo, carrying a 
two lane roadway over the American and 
Canadian ship canals, which was recom- 
mended for adoption by the authorities 
concerned. 



>^-'T(l- i4g 



■ Se 



SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY 

DAVID BARNARD STEINMAN, bridge -builder on five continents, 
inventor, scientist, and mathematician, educator, prolific contributor to 
knowledge, and gifted poet, you are an example of the possibilities of the 
full life for all who can and will live it. 

Having taken your Bachelor of Science degree "summa cum laude" 
at the City College of New York and your Civil Engineer, Master of Arts, 
and Ph.D. degrees at Columbia, and having served as Professor of Civil 
Engineering at the University of Idaho and as Professor of Civil and Mechanical 
Engineering at City College, you went into private practice in 1920. Since 
that year, you have been designing or consulting engineer in the construction 
of more than four -hundred and forty bridges - -among them, the Florianopolis 
Bridge in Brazil, which is the largest in South America; the Mount Hope 
Bridge in Rhode Island, the St. John's Bridge in Oregon, the Carquinex Straits 
Bridge in California, the Henry Hudson Bridge in New York, the Constitution 
Bridge in Puerto Rico, the Thousand Islands International Bridge, the Baghdad 
Bridge over the Tigris River in Iraq, the Kingston Bridge across the Hudson 
River, the Raritan River Bridge in New Jersey, and the Connecticut Turnpike 
Bridge in New Haven. And you have recently completed another international 
bridge, that over the St. Lawrence Seaway, as well as the world's largest 
bridge project, the Mackinac Bridge in Michigan. You are now engaged on 
plans for an international bridge at Saulte Sainte Marie and for an inter- 
continental bridge over the Bosporus, as well as for a long-span steel-arch 
bridge in Pakistan. 

You are the author of a number of standard books on bridge design and 
construction as well as of the biographical work The Builders of the Bridge, 
and author, also, of more than six hundred technical papers and inspirational 
articles. Furthermore, an accomplished poet, you have published two volumes 
of verse and have seen your poems printed in many periodicals of national or 
international circ\ilation. And you have promoted the cause of poetry by founding 
visiting-poets series at four universities as well as by serving as an officer of 
the Poetry Society of America and similar organizations. As founder and 
president of the David B. Steinman Foundation, you have provided grants for 
research, education, and student aid. 

For your far reaching achievements, you have earned many and diverse 
honors. Eight of your bridges have won the annual award for the most beautiful 
in America. You have twice received the Norman Medal, the highest award of 
the American Society of Civil Engineers; and, in 1952 and 1954, the highest 



SIt^ 






/-^c 



N^ttr jl0tk Simtis, 



NEW YORK, THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1959. 



2 HONORED BY HUNTER 



Engineer and Lawyer Get 
Gold Medals From Coliego 

The Gold Medal for Distin- 
guished Service to Hunter Col- 
lege was presented yesterday 
to David B. Steinman, interna- 
tionally known bridge engineer, 
and Leon Finley, international 
lawyer. The presentations were 
made by Dr. George N. Shuster, 
president of the college, at th9 
school's Manhattan building at 
695 Park Avenue. 

Mr. Steinman established the 
Irene Steinman Scholarship 
Fund at Hunter in honor of his 
wife. He is known as a poet 
and benefactor of poets as well 
as an engineer. 

Mr. Finley, the first president 
of the Hunter College Opera 
Association, established an an- 
nual scholarship at the college 
for a student from Germany. 



^. TG 140 
. S 8 




ciminv Sc 




JULY, 1959 



The Harp 

D. B. Steinman 



Five stories high above a city street 
He dwelt, a child with wonder in his eyes. 
For him, through winter cold and summer heat. 
The sunbeams danced and stars sang lullabies. ' 

One day, as if on wings, a stranger came 
And stood within the room, unheralded. 
Gently he spoke, calling the boy by name: 
"David, play on your harp!" he softly said. 

How did the stranger guess the secret dream 
That, day and night, within the child's heart burned? 
Outside the window, in the sunset gleam. 
Glittered the instrument for which he yearned: 

A bridge! The cables swung across the bay. 
The strands that hummed like harp-strings murmuring 
They whispered to the child, "Some day. . Some day. . " ' 
"There is my harp, sir. I can hear it sing!" 



'fr— »«[ 




NEW YORK 

Professional 
Engineer 



May-June 1959 • Vol. 16 • No. 3 




I' 



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Engineer Extraordinary: 
D. B. STEINMAN 

• Post-president NYSSPE 

• Founder of NSPE (1934) 

• Renown bridgebuilder 









WEDNESDAY, JULY 29, 1959. 



SECTIONS OF BRIDGE 
MEET IN NEW HAVEN 



SDfCial to The New York Times. 

NEW HAVEN, July 27— The 
suspended sections of the sec- 
ond largest box-girder bridge' 
in the United States were joined 
here today. The central part of 
the bridge is 378 feet long. 

The sections were joined when 
workmen of the American 
Bridge Company set in place a 
fifly-nine-foot girder weighing 
ninety-eight tons. This was 
swung into position on the 
south side of the bridge. A simi- 
lar girder will be installed on 
the north side later this week. 

The bridge will carry the Oak 
Street connector road over four- 
teen mainline tracks of the New 
York, New Haven and Hartford 
Railroad just north of Union 
Station. It will link the Con- 
necticut Turnpike with the 
heart of the city. 

The bridge, which was de- 
signed by Dr. David B. Stein- 
man of New York, is constructed 
of flanged girders fitted into 
one another to form squares or 
boxes that are linked together 
by a web of plates. The sec- 
tions are built out from each 
side, girder box6s and plates 
riveted together, until joined in 
the middle. That is what was 
done today. 

The only box-girder bridge in 
the country longer than this 
eight-lane highway span is one 
crossing part of New Haven 
Harbor and opened last year. 



^-iC ^^c 




Closing Members Are Placed . . . 




In Long Box-Girder Span 



The closing girders of the longest 
box-girder span in the United States 
June been set in place. 

The bridge, part of the Oak Street 
connector in New Ha\en. Conn., is a 
three-span continiions unit with a cen- 
ter span of 378 ft 9 in. and side spans 
of 111 ft 6 in. Its two main girders 
are 21 ft 64 in. deep at the piers, 12 ft 
5i in. deep beyond their haunches. 

The structure is an important link 
in the high-speed road svsteni connect- 
ing New Haxen's city streets with the 
Connecticut Turnpike and with the 
main high\va\ to Hartford, the state's 
capital. It will carr\ eight lanes of traf- 
fic across an electrified main line and 
terminal vard l)elong!ng to the New 



■^'ork, New Haven and Hartford Rail- 
road. 

In prelniiinar\ studies made to de- 
termine the most satisfacturv and eco- 
nomical characteristics of a bridge across 
the tracks, an attempt was made to 
locate a pier in the center of the track 
right-of-wa\ so as to shorten the re- 
quired span. 

But l)ecause train moxcments in the 
busv \ard are automaticajh controlled, 
the relocation of tracks and utilities 
would ha\c cost almost fi\e times more 
than the amount that could have been 
saved bv shortening the spans, regard- 
less of the kind of bridge used. It was 
desirable, therefore, to keep piers out- 
side the tracks. 



Ihicc tvpes of structures were con- 
sidered: a through-truss, a plate girder, 
and the box girder. Configuration of 
the tracks in the area of the proposed 
structure dictated in favor of the box- 
girder design. The wav the tracks fan 
out would have required placing piers 
for cither of the other two possible de- 
signs in such position that a long span 
would have been required. 

The use of two through-trusses, set 
120 ft apart, would have required a 
span length of 440 ft. .\ plate girder 
design using four girders for each half 
of the roadwav would have cut the sjjan 
to 410 ft. The box-girder design, with 
the girders closely spaced and the road- 
wav carried on long cantilevercd brack- 
ets outside them, permitted the reduc- 
tion of the span to 378 ft 9 in. 

TTie webs of each box girder varv in 
thickness from i to | in. and arc set 
5 ft 6 in. on centers. The maximum 
flange section is made up of four 8 x 8 x 
^-in. angles, five cover plates, 86 x J in.. 
and one cover plate, 48 x | in., for a 
total area of 404 sq in. exclusive of 
the webs. Low-allov steel was specified 
and thickness was kept to a maximum 
of I in. 

Moment, shear, and deflection calcu- 
lations include the effects of a future 
wearing surface weighing 2 9 lb per sq 
ft of roadwav. To compensate for 
maximum dead load deflection the 
structure was designed with a center 
span camber of plus 1 3 A. in. and an end 
span camber of minus 2iV in. 

Due to the relatively short end span, 
there is an uplift at the abutments. To 
off,set this uplift, counterweights of 
concrete are provided at the end floor 
beams. The abutments bearing these 
concrete weights measure 60 ft bv 6 ft 
bv 7i ft and weigh 211 tons apiece. 

D. B. Steinman of New York Citv 
was designing engineer. Tlie founda- 
tion and other substructure work was 
done bv C. ^V. Blakeslee and Sons. Inc. 
of New Haven and erection of struc- 
tural steel was handled bv American 
Bridge Co. Mariani Construction Co., 
New Ilavcn, was general contractor. 



ENGINEERING 
NEWSRECORD 



August 13, 1959 



X- /c- f^c 



So 



MAY 



1959 



VOL. 29 • NO. 5 



CIVIL 

ENGINEERING 



TB£ MAGAZINE OF ENGINEEBED COtfSTBVCTION 



Long-Span Steel Arch Railroad Bridge for Pakisfan 




New railroad bridge over the Rohri Channel of the Indus River, near Sukkur, West 
Pakistan, will be the ninth longest steel arch in the world, when it is completed early 
in 1961. It will be a steel trussed arch with span oi 806 it 9 in. and total height of 
204 it. The project will replace a cantilever structure, the 70-Year-old Landsdowne 
Bridge, which is now restricted to the lightest locomotives and speeds of 5 mph. The 
new bridge will carry one broad-gauge track, plus a 15-it-wide concrete deck, for 
emergency use by military vehicles. D. B. Steinman, M. ASCE, is consulting engineer 
on the project lor the Government oi Pakistan. 




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CITATION ,, ^^ 
X. TG 140 

Hunter College 
Honors Convocation, April 29, 1959 . S 8 

D_R. DAVID BARNARD STEINMAN 

Having graduated from the City College summa cum laude 
and pursued graduate study leading to the doctorate at Columbia 
University the distinguished engineer whom Hunter College is 
honoring today embarked on a career which Is perhaps the most 
notable of Its kind In the history of our country. Beautiful 
bridges which in the United States and on four other continents 
span rivers giving testimony to his knowledge and genius have 
acquired an almost legendary fame v/hich finds one of its peaks in 
the quite marvelous bridge at Mackinac, now in process of comple- 
tion — surely a feat of engineering of which the Romans them- 
selves would have been proud. But this master of the art of build- 
ing has been notable always for his deep interest in and concern 
for humanistic education. Perhaps he sees in this his truest claim 
to distinction. It has led him to become a poet in his own right 
and a doer of good for poets as well. Fortunate in his choice of a 
charming Hunter College graduate as his bride, he has been a very 
generous benefactor to her Alma Mater. In particular we owe to his 
concern the establishment of the Irene Steinman Scholarship Fund. 
Hunter College honors itself in awarding to him the President's 
Medal for Distinguished Service. 

♦ ♦ * ♦ * 



April the twenty-ninth 
Nineteen hundred fifty-nine 



(aravan 




X. TG 140 
. S 8 



Moment of Splendor 



?i 



vanescent 
as a cresent 

of the moon. 
As fireflies hover 
glimmering over 

a blue lagoon, 
Love is a tender 
moment of splendor 

dying too soon. 



- D. B. Steinman 



y 



March-April 
1959 



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. S 8 



• THEi^ 




EVANGELIST 



April 19, 1959 



FRONT 
RANK 



PERSPECTIVE 

by D. B. Steinman 

Flung from the fingers of Om- 
nipotence, 

The shimmering clouds of star- 
dust found their place 

As whirling suns and planets, to 
commence 

Their ordered orbits in the realms 
of space. 

On one small orb amid these blaz- 
ing stars, 

A blinking biped — Man — at 
length appears. 

His Eden-earth soon racked by 
greed and wars, 

He finds the Light to overcome 
his fears. 

Of all creation in this vast design, 
He scans the whole and glimpses 
the divine. 



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in Books 



SERVING MICHIGAN "siNCE~lir8^ 



Spring, 1959 



MICHIGAN IN POETRY 

Dr. David B. Steinman, designer and 
engineer of the Mackinac Bridge, is a 
member of the Poetry Society of Mich- 
igan and a trustee of the Poetry So- 
ciety of America, among his many 
other affiliations. His volume of 
P^^etry, I Built a Bridge , is witness 
to his belief that poetry is worth- 
while and necessary: 
"The light gleams on my strands and 
bars 
In glory when the sun goes down. 
I spread a net to hold the stars 
And wear the sunset as my crown." 



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M-:W ^ORK, TUESDAY, APRIL 21, 1959. 



NEW SCIENCE AIDS SAFETY OF SPANS 

Bridge Aerodynamics Used by Designer of Mackinac Link to Ban Wind Damage 



On a windy November morn- 
ing, the engineer in charge of 
the Taconia Narrows Bridge 
rushed to the telephone. 
Alarmed at the rhythmic rise 
and fall of the 2,860-foot sus- 
pension span, the third longest 
in the world, he oi'dered stiffen- 
ing wire ropes for immediate 
installation. When he returned, 
the span was gone. 

Out of this death in 1940 of 
a four-month-old engineering 
masterpiece came the phoenix- 
like birth of a new science, 
bridge aerodynamics, according 
to Science Service. 

In less than two decades, the 
science has reached perhaps its 
ultimate expression in the new 
Straits of Mackinac Bridge in 
upper Michigan, The bridge is 
the first utilizing the concept 
of "perfect aerodynamic stabil- 
ity." 

The world's longest suspen- 
sion bridge, 8,614 feet from 
anchorage to anchorage, "Big 
Mac" can withstand virtually 
infinite wind velocity. With its 
deck openings shut solid by ice 
and snow, it co\ild shrug off 
a 632-mile-an-honr wind, a blow 
that is far beyond what will 
ever happen. What is more re- 
markable is this: the stronger 
the blow, the more rigid and 
resisting the bridge becomes. 

The lesson learned from the 
Taconia collapse '.vas a shocking 
one, indeed, to bridge engineers 
who venerated the principle of 
flexibility in suspension spans. 
The Taconia Bridge was the 
most flexible ever built and was 
hailed as one of the safest. 

During its construction the 
motions of the span, even in 
gentle breezes, caused "seasick- 
ness" among the rugged work- 
ers. Yet. the supreme confidence 
of authorities, designers and 
builders was not shaken. Motor- 
ists seemed to enjoy the bounc- 
ing, swaying ride on the bridge 
they dubbed "Galloping Gertie." 

Writhing Is Violent in Wind 

Then came the 42-mile-an- 
hour wind, violent up-and-down 
oscillations and writhing. Like 
a narrow wooden ruler being 



twisted m opposite auections at 
each end. the span snapped. 
Tearing away from suspending 
cables, it Clashed into Puget 
Sound more than 200 feet be- 
low. 

The catastrophe was not un- 
expected to Dr. Psviri B. Sfein- 
man. dosignei ol i.ui.uitLU uf 
bridges uiinng them the Mac- 
kinac. H<- had previously sug- 
gested thai the span be stiff- 
ened. 

Before most of his prdfession 
had recognized aerodynamic os- 
cillations as a problem. Dr. 
Steinnian had begun to work on 
the solution He recently said 
that some twenty bridges com- 
pleted since 1930 have been sub- 
jected to disturbing or danger- 
ous oscillations. At least two of 
them, the Golden Gate and the 
Bronx-Whitestone. have under- 
gone costly stiffening, recon- 
struction. 

Dr. Steinman credits John A. 
Roebling, designer of the 
Brooklyn Bridge more than 
ninety .vears ago, as being the 
first man to do something 
about aerodynamic instability. 
With an intuitive rather than 
scientific grasp of the problem, 
Roebling built his su.spension 
spans using special stiffening 
methods. For nearly three- 
quarters of a century there- 
after, this phase of bridge 
building w,Ts totally ignored, 

Mne stiffening is not the 
best way to build large and safe 
suspension bridges. Dr. Stein- 
man maintains that it is both 
more scientific and more eco- 
nomical to eliminate the cause 
of aerodvnaniic instab:lity llian 
to build heavy pov.-erful stnic- 
tiiics to resi.st the force of the 
wind. 

It is .-^uipusing that aeiody- 
naniics was not applied to 
bridges sooner since it has been 
utilized by airciaft designers 
from Ihe boeinnmg of the air 
age. Wings are shaped in smh 
a way that the ail flow around 
them piodures a greater pres- 
suio nil the under surlace, thus 
a lifting fiiice. 

Similar forces act on bridge 
roadways v.hirh are supported 
bv rabies fiom aho\e and a net- 



work of steel girders below. In 
a steady wind, the flexible span 
tends to oscillate up and down 
in harmony with the air pros- 
sure which acts rhythmically to 
force it up and then down. 
These oscillations are self-ex- 
citing and may. in a short time, 
grow violent in non-aerodynam- 
ic bridges- 
Effect Is Demonstrat«cl 

Dr. Steinman performs a 
neat simple demonstration of 
this effect. Mounting half a 
solid sphere between two light 
.springs he exposes the flat side 
to a stream of air from an elec- 
tric fan. He pulls the half- 
sphere up or down slightly and 
lets go. The resulting small 
oscillation rapidly builds up into 
a violent one. When the round 
side of the half-sphere faces the 
fan, ' any oscillation that is 
started promptly damps out. 

Employing this "round-side" 
principle, Ur. Steinman designed 
the Mackinac Bridge. As he 
described it:* 

"When the bridge floor is 
moving up. the resultnnt aero- 
dynamic forces art down: and 
vice versa. As a result, any in- 
cipient vibration, as from traf- 
fic, is quickly brought to rest. 
The bridge ac'ually utilizes the 
force pf the wind to produce 
stability: the stronger the wind, 
the more stable the bridge." 

As an added safety factor. 
the two inner traffic iancs are 
constructed of open steel grill- 
work, thus eliminating .some of 
the solid surface that otherwise 
would be exposed to wind pres- 
sure.'. For the same reason, 
there are open slots at the far 
edges of the outer lanes. 

Dr. Steinman believes that 
the design of the Mackinac 
Bridge permitted a saving of 
SI.*). 000. 000 in its construction- 
its total cost was nearly 
$100,000,000. 

The finished structure repre- 
sents to him a triumph of 
mathematics applied to bridge 
design and a towering symbol 
of greater bridges to coino 



Nipw fork 



X. TG 140 
. S 8 



Olonstntrtiott JfietuH 



•M6nday, May 4, 1959 



Hunter Honors 
David B. Steinman 



At the Honors Convocation at 
Hunter College in New York City 
on Wednesday, April 29, the Pres- 
ident's Gold Medal for Disting- 
uished Service was presented to 
David B. Steinman, internationally 
famous bridge engineer. 

At the Commencement Cere- 
monies at Syracuse University on 
June 1, the honorai-y degree of 
Doctor of Engineering will be con- 
ferred upon Dr. Steinman. This 
will be the bridgebuilder"s twen- 
tieth honoring degree. He now 
holds honorary doctorates in Sci- 
ence, Engineering. Literature, Hu- 
manities, and Laws, from leading 
universities on three continents. 



Keprintea from 

"Who's Who in Engineering' 

8th Edition- 1959 



■s- 






"^(3 



STEINMAN. David Barnard, Cons. Engr., 117 
Lilerty St.. N.Y. City; res. 305 Riverside Drive, 

Bridge' Engr. ; b. N.Y. City, June 11, 1886; ed. 
CCNY BS (summa cum laude), 1906; award- 
ed 12 m'edals and 3 yrs. fellowship in Mcchs.; 
Columbia Univ. Sell. Engrg., C.E., 1909 ; awarded 
2 yrs. scholarships in Applied Sci. ; Co umbia 
Univ A.M.. 1909; awarded 1 yr. grad. scholarship 
i: engrg; Ph.D., Columbia Univ., 1911; mem. 
Phi Beta Kappa; m. N.Y. City, 1915, Irene 
Hoffman; ch. : John Francis, Alberta, David. 
Misccl engrg. wk., 1906-10; cons. engr. & prof. 
CE. Univ. Ida., 1910-14; spl. asst. to Gustav 
Lindenthal, on Hell Gate Arch Bridge N.Y. City, 
aid other bridges, 1914-17; prof. CE. & M.E., 
CCNY 1917-20; cons, engr., bridge wk., 19Z0 
to date, incl. bridges at: Florianopolis (Brazil) 
suspension (largest bridge in S.A.) ; Carqumez 
Strait (Calif.) cantilever; Mt. Hope (Bristol, K. 
1); Waldo- Hancock ( Penol scot Riv.. Me); 
Grand'Mcre (Que.); St. Johns (Portland, Ore.); 
Sky R'de & Obs. Towers, 1933 Chicago txpn. ; 
Henry Hudson (N.Y. City) arch; Thousand Islands 
(joining U.S. and Canada) ; Deer Isle (Maine) ; 
Marine Pnrkwav (N.Y. City); Vancouver (BC); 
Deegan Blvd. Express Hwy., N.Y.C. 1945-50; 
Martin Pena Channel Bridge. P.R. 1950-51; Kings- 
ton-Rhinecliff Bridge over Hudson River, N.Y. ; 
rcconstrn. of old Brooklyn Bridge. N.Y. 1948.53; 
Rte. 4 Pkway. and Rte. 4 Bridges. N.J. ; proposed 
bridge across Mess'na Strait, Italy; Mackinac 
Straits Bri.lge, Mich. 1953-57; Raritan River 
Bridge, N. J. ; reconstrn. of Manhattan Bridge, N. 
Y. ; and others in 5 continents; des. Karradah 
Bridge, Baghdad, Iraq., 1957.58; des. bridge across 
Bosporus. Turkey. 1957; Founder & pres.. The 
David B. Steinman Fndn. ; lecturer on bridge des. 
at m,any colls, and univs. Awards and honors 
Silver scroll from II engrg. socs. for contributions 
to advancement of engrg. 1932; Thomas Fitch 
Rowland Prize, Am. Soc. CE. 1929; J. James R. 
Croes Medal. Am. Soc. CE. 1919; Norman Med- 
al Am Soc. CE. 1923 and 51; Artistic Bridge 
Awards, Am. Inst. Ste.l Constrn. 1930, 32, 37, 
38. 3". 42, 54, 55 : Townsend Harris Medal 1934 
and Alumni Servic Medal 1936 from Assoc. Alum- 
ni of C.C.N.Y. ; Alfred T. White Prize, Brook, 
lyn Engrs. Club 1934; Prize for Vow of Svc. 
adopted for engrg. profn.. Am. .^ssn. Engrs. 1926; 
medal for outstanding civic cont' n. (reconstrn. of 
Bklv.i. Brid,7e) by Greater N.Y. Civic Center 
A«sn. and 55 civic, archtl. ?nd sci-ntific orgns. 
1950; highest award of N.S.P.E. 1952; testimonial 
Scroll by Alumni and Friends of Madson House 
1952; Distinguished Service Scroll, Nat. Council 
State Bds. of Engrg. Exam'ners 1949; Cert, of 
Cooperation, U.S. Mutual Security Agency 1952; 
Eloy Alfaro Cross. Republic of Panama ; Hon. 
D.C.E., Univ. Bologna, Italy 1953; DSc. Minerva 
Univ., Italy 1953; Hon. D.Sc. Univ. Ghent 
(Belgium) 1953; hon. mem. Free French War 
Veterans; Cross of Comdr., Grand Prix Humanitare 
de Belgique 1952; Cross of Knight of the Order 
de Chevaliers de la Croix de Lorraine. Paris 1952; 
Hon. Compan'on of the Resistance of the Order 
des Chevaliers de la Croix de Lorraine et de» 
Compagnons de la Resistance. Paris 1952; hon. 
mem. Legion Beige; Knight Comdr. (with Star) 
of the Order of the Gold Cross of the Mil. Chapter 
of Cyprus and Jerusalem. Rome 1952 (founded 
1199 A.D.) ; hon. mem.. French Legion of Honor. 
1954; Gzowski M.. Engrg. Inst. Can., 1957; 
Goeth.-l5 M., S.A.M.E.. 1957; Levy M., Franklin 
lust., 1957: Kiml rough M., Am. Inst. Steel Cons- 
tr.. 1957; 18 honorary degrees from U.S. & foreign 
univs. Acrademia di Filosogia Classica, Rome. 
1952. Author of a number of books on bridge 
constrn. ; number of treatises and tech. papers, 
1911 to date; contbr. to Encyclopedia Britannica, 
Encyclopedia Americana. Colliers Encyclopedia: 



num. arts, in A.S.C.E. Trans, and other engrg. 
jours. ; profl. writings translated into for. Iang». 
Pres. Am. Assn. Engrs. 1925-26. life mem., chmn. 
Civic Com., N.Y. Chapt. 1926-27, Ednl. Com 
1926-27; founder and pres. Natl. Soc. Profl. Engrs. 
1934.36 ; prjs. Natl. Council State Bds. of Engrg. 
Exams., 1931. 32, v.p. 1930-31, chmn. Com. of 
Exams. 1930-33; pres. N.Y. State Soc. Profl. 
Engrs. 1930-33, chmn. Bd. of Tr. 1933-43, 1948- 
49, life mem.; chmn. NY. State Bd. of Exams, 
for Profl. Engrs. 1933-35, 1941-43, 1945-47, vice 
chmn. 1952-53; chmn. Struct. Div., Am. Soc. CE. 
1931-33. chmn. Local Mem. Com. 1929-37, mem. 
Exec. Bd., Struct. Div. 1929-34, PuHns. Com., 
Struct. Div. 1930-32. Com. on Steel 1929-31, chmn. 
Profl. Relations Com., N.Y. Sect. 1934-41, v. chmn. 
1950-51. chmn. 1951-52 Com. on Reg. of Engrs.; 
V. chmn. N.Y. State Bd. of Licensing for Profl. 
Engrs. and Land Surveyors 1931-33. mem. 1930- 
41 ; mem. Ex-c. Com.. Engrs. Council for Profl. 
Devel. 1933-39. Com. on Profl. Recognition 1933- 
41; founder and pres.. Am. Toll Br. Assn. 1932- 
34; pres. N.Y. Acad, of Sci. 1952-53, life fellow, 
mem. Council 1951. 53; chmn. U.S. Council of 
Internat. Assn. of Br. & Struct. Engrs. 1950-51; 
chmn. N.Y. State. Nat. Com. for Trade Recovery 
1933-34; pres. Pan Am. PuM'c Works, Inc.; v.p. 
T'oga-Nichols Br. Co., Smithboro Br. Co. ; dir. 
Independence Br. Co., Interl oro Br. Co. Mem. 
Com. on Bridge Legislation, Am. Engrg. Council 
1930-34 ; mem. Engrg. Inst, of Canada, .Am. Ry. 
Engrg As'in.. A.S.T.^t.. Am. Concrete Inst., Am. 
Mil. Engrs., Munic. Cngrs. of N.Y., A.S.E.E., S.- 
A.E., Am. Math. Soc, Acad. Polit. Sci., Corp. 
of Profl. Engrs. of Prov. of Que., Profl. Engrs. 
of Ore.. Assn. of Profl. Engrs. of Prov. of B.C., 
Brooklyn Soc. of Engrs.. Internat. Assn. of Naviga- 
tion Congresses, N.Y. Good Rds. Assn.. Municipal 
Art Soc, Nat. Orean'zing Com. of Freedom Inter- 
nal., Soc. for the Preservation of Covered Bridges, 
Public Works Com. of N.Y. Soc. of Archts. ; life 
fellow, Royal Soc. of Arts (England) ; fellow. Aerial 
League of Am., Am. Geog. Soc, A.A.A.S.; hon. 
mem. Societe des Ingenieurs Professionale (France), 
Association pour le D.velopment de I'Electro- 
mech.anique et de TEIectrometallurgie (France), 
Ohio Soc. Profl. Engrs., Tex Soc. Profl. Engrs., 
Kv Soc. Profl. Engrs., Hudson Co. Soc Profl. 
Engrs Ida. Soc. Profl. Enirrs. (life). Union 
Countv Chant, of N.J. Soc. Profl. Engrs., Erie 
Co (NY.) Chapt. Profl. Engrs., Archt. & Engrs. 
Airance. Reg. Profl. En/r., N.Y., Ohio, la., Nebr., 
Me. 111., Conn., Ore., W. Va., B.C., Que., and 
Ont. Clubs: Brooklyn Engrs. (pres. 1931-33, v.p. 
1930-31. chmn. Me.tings & Papers Com. 1929-31), 
N.Y. Chapt. Phi Beta Kappa (pres. 1933-34), Co- 
lumbia Univ. ; Phi Beta Kappa Associates (life 
mem.), "Ends of the Earth." Engrs. (New York), 
Millions Club of Sydney, Australia (hon. mem.), 
Nat. Travel Club; Chi Epsilon (nat. hon. mem. 
1950", Columbia Univ. Chapt. of Sigma Xi (elect- 
ed 1951). Tau Beta Pi 'hon. mem.). Sigma Alpha 
(hon. mom.). Mem. Nat. Council, Nat. Econ. 
League 1933-40; Nat. Pub. Housing Conf. Exec. 
Com.; Bus. Men's Groun. NY. Soc. for Ethical 
Culture 1925-27; pres.. chmn. Bd. of Tr., Madison 
House Settlement 1926-27; mem. Assoc. Alumni, 
C.C.N.Y. (v.p. 1930-31, 1949-50, dir. 1929-36, 1947- 
49) ; lion. mem. Tech. Alumni. C.C.N.Y. ; mem. 
Engrs. Council of the City Coll. Alumni (founder 
& d'r. ); mem. Cooper Union Alumni Assn.; mem. 
Nat. Com. for Colum' ia Univ. School of Engrg. ; 
mem. Columbia Associates, Columbia Univ.; hon. 
mem. Intematl. Faculty, Univ. of Andhra (India) ; 
fellow. Research Council. Emerson Univ. ; mem. 
Colegio de Ingenieros de P.R. ; hon. v.p. and mem. 
■ Advis. Com., Laymen's Nat. Comm. Maj., Corps 
of Engrs., N.Y. State Guard; hon, mem., Internat. 
Inst. Am. Ideals ; hon. mem. French Folklore 
Soc ; life mem., Soc. des Amis d'Andri-Marie 
Ampere (Fr.) ; charter mem.. The Patroons of 
Rensselaer; mem. N.Y. State Assoc. Architects. 



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Bridges 
unite science 
and art 

D. B. Steinman 
Consulting Engineer 



The Cooper Union 



February-March 1959 



ALUMNI NEWS 




The natural world offers mankind a 
variety of things of beauty, but it offers 
no greater reward than the beauty man 
creates out of the resources or mater- 
ials of nature, whether they be a 
statue, a building, or a bridge. In 
my own life, the bridge with its curves, 
arcs, and angles, as it fights gravity 
and clings to the sky. is the living 
symbol of man's struggle for growth, 
for conquest, for expression. 

Each man takes a symbol out of his 
experience or makes his own concept 
of an ideal out of his daily task. The 
excavator sees a symbol of power and 
poetry in the snort of a bulldozer or 
the grinding teeth of a clam-shell 
bucket. The architect of a skyscraper 
has the same poetic glow of dedication 
to grandeur and splendor as the de- 
signer of a cathedral, and to both it 
can be spiritual and esthetic triumph. 

I am a bridge builder and I am 
primarily concerned here with voca- 



tional esthetics as a device or agent of 
cultural rewards. I can admire the 
achievement of Roebling in the old 
Brooklyn Bridge, and the sense of 
adventure in his mind when he looked 
across the tidal sweep of the East River 
and visualized the web of steel that 
would support a path for commerce 
between Manhattan and Brooklyn. I 
speak with feeling here because it was 
my task in 1948 to help reconstruct 
the bridge to meet the demands of 
modern automotive commerce. Here 
was the first bridge to dare the drag 
of gravity using steel cables to carry 
the weight of the span and its traffic. 
This was a victory for the poetic mind 
in action. 

Vocational esthetics can be applied 
to shipbuilding, from the wind-driven 
clipper ships of Donald McKay to the 
screw-driven transatlantic liners of 
William Francis Gibbs. Man. imitative 
and curious, has found esthetic excite- 
ment in his conquest of the air from the 
first paoer design of Leonardo da Vinci 
to reality of flieht by the Wright 
brothers at Kittv Hawk. 

A beautiful building is a pleasurable 
experience for the eye. not alone in 
the success of its lines, or the materials 
used, but often in its variety of scenic 
moods against the dawn, the sunset, the 
moonlight, or even the snow sauall. 
Buildings, boats, and bridges take on 
personalities, and even suggest individ- 
ual temperaments. There was even talk 
of the demon-possessed bridge that 
crossed the Tacoma Narrows and. with 
mysterious warnings, whipped itself to 
destruction on November 7. 1940. 
Actually, it was an evil wind whose 



force and fickleness were underesti- 
mated that set up the violent contor- 
tions of the steel span in a dance of 
death. The whims of nature have to 
be considered in an esthetic approach 
to the combined utility and beauty of 
a bridge, boat, or building. 

Cities have personalities that conjure 
up esthetic and cultural excitement but, 
when you analyze the sources of their 
individuality, these are often easily 
identified sources of the pleasure that 
is evoked. Any mental picture of Lon- 
don immediately brings up the Thames 
with its bridges and bustling river 
traffic. San Francisco, blessed with a 
natural setting of beauty, unveils its 
Golden Gate Bridge almost daily from 
the fog that rolls in from the sea. 
Manhattan combines architectural gran- 
deur and splendor with its spiked 
horizons and river rhythms of sky- 
scrapers and bridges. 

Occasionally, an esthetic-minded pul> 
lie can change official decisions. In the 
design of the George Washington 
Bridge, the strong esthetic appeal is 
due largely to the natural grace and 
simplicity of the suspension type — 
expressed by two high and sturdy 
towers and the natural parabolic arcs 
of the great cables from which the 
slender floor system is suspended. The 
striking beauty of the steel towers was 
not planned. They were designed merely 
as load-carrving skeletons to be sub- 
sequently encased in concrete and 
masonry. The authorities gladly yielded 
to the public when it demanded that 
no false facing be added. 

The late Arnold W. Brunner. archi- 





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Flatbush - Tompkins Congregational Church 
Dorchester Road and East 18th St., Brooklyn 26, N. Y. 



April 1, 1959 



Miracle Bridge at Mackinac 

Miracle Bridge at Mac\inac will be the title of 
the address which the Men's Club will hear on 
Monday, May 4, at 8:15 p.m. The guest speaker is 
the world famous bridge designer and engineer. Dr. 
David B. Steinman. His achievements include more 
than 400 bridges which touch harbors and rivers 
on every continent except Africa in 21 countries 
and the states from Rhode Island to Oregon. Dr. 
Steinman is not only a distinguished bridge engineer, 
but also a poet (with 150 published works), scien- 
tist, scholar, educator and lecturer (the recipient of 
22 degrees, four of them earned) and foremost, a 
humanitarian, who stated "we must cling to honor, 
to moral courage, to humanitarian ideals, to all the 
sanctities of life — to defend them, for these are 
the things our Godless adversary would destroy." 

The Mackinac Bridge, a dream since 1854, became 
a reality in November 1957, after three and a half 
years of construction. The magnificent structure 
links the peninsulas between St. Ignace and Mack- 
inaw City. The project features a suspension bridge 
with center span of J, 800 feet, the second longest 
in the world. But the total length of this suspension 
bridge, including anchorages, is 8,614 feet, making 
it the longest suspension bridge in the world. It 
tops San Francisco's famed Golden Gate Bridge 
by 2,614 feet. The towers extend to a height of 
552 feet above low water. The height of the towers 
above the water is equivalent to a forty-six story 
office building. A total of $99,800,000 worth of 
Mackinac Bridge revenue bonds was purchased by 
private investors all over the country to cover the 
cost of the structure. The Mackinac Bridge is unique 
in that it is designed to improve tourist traffic be- 
tween famed vacation areas of Michigan's lower and 
upper peninsulas. The 900,000 plus vehicles, which 
annually in recent years have crossed the Straits of 
Mackinac on the ferries, is expected to double in 
the future. The new bridge reduces the crossing 
time from more than an hour to ten minutes in 
comfort and safety. Dr. Steinman's bridge has won 
six gold medals and the Proctor award for scientific 
research. This article is just a preview of the ex- 
citing evening in store for the men. 



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K))t American parir 



To France 

What is your magic spell, O France, 
To throb our pulses with romance? 
You bring the gift of love and song. 
The breath of spring for which we long; 
The sunshine where soft winds caress 
To stir our dreams of happiness. 
With beauty shrined in life and art, 
France, you have given the world a heart! 

And what is your flame of sacred light 
Inspiring hope in darkest night? 
With Freedom's battleflags unfurled 
Your hero sons have thrilled the world. 
They gave their lives to shape your plan — 
To build the Brotherhood of Man. 
Your noble dream is now our goal — 
France, you have given the world a soul! 
New York — David B. Steinman 









January, February, March, 195^9 



X. TC UO 
. S 8 
NEW RAILROAD BRIDGE IN PAKISTAN TO BE LONG-SPAN STEEL ARCH, 

Designed by D. B. STEINMAN, Past President N.S.P.E. 




Tlie new railroad bridge over the Rohri Channel 
of the Indus River, near Sukkur in West Pakistan, 
will be the ninth longest steel arch in the world, ac- 
cording to plans and specifications that have just 
been completed by D. B. Steinman, Consulting En- 
gineer, for the Government of Pakistan. 

The new bridge will be a steel trussed arch having 
an 806-foot 9-inch span between end pins of bottom 
rib. The rise of the bottom rib is 180 feet and the 
distance between ribs at the crown is 24 feet, making 
the total height of structure 204 feet. 

The bridge is designed to carry approximately E 55 
loading on one bi-oad-gauge {5'6") track. The floor of 
the bridge will be provided with a concrete deck, 
fifteen feet wide between curbs and centered on the 
track centerline, for use of Class 80 military vehicles 
in an emergency. 

The new bridge is to be constructed 100 feet down- 
stream from and will replace the seventy-year old 
Lansdowne Bridge for railway traffic. The latter will 
be converted to highway use after the arch has been 
completed. 

The exi.sting Lansdowne Bridge, completed in 1889 
from plans by Sir A. M. Rendel, is a cantilever bridge, 
with a main span of 820 feet. It was originally de- 



signed as a combination highway and railway bridge, 
but was later converted to a railway and pedestrian 
bridge. At the present time, the bridge is restricted 
to the lightest locomotive and a speed of only 5 miles 
per hour. 

Following is a list of the world's longest steel arches 
up to the present time. The Sukkur Arch will become 
ninth in the list upon its completion now scheduled 
for early in 1961. 

Span 
Name Location (Ft.) Year 

1. Bayonne Kill Van Kull, 

N. Y. C 1652 1931 

2. Sydney 

Harbor Australia 1650 1930 

3. Birchenough S. Rhodesia 1080 1935 

4. Nagasaki- Kyushu Island, 

Sasebo Japan 1042 1955 

5. Glen Canyon Arizona 1028 1958 

6. Hell Gate New York City 97VA 1917 

7. Rainbow Niagara Falls 950 1941 

8. Duisburg- 

Rheinhausen Rhine River 838 1951 

9. Volta Ganna 805 1956 

10. Henry Hudson New York City 800 1936 

11. Inoura Narrows Omura Bay, Japan.. 710 1955 



THE HUDSON ENGINEERING JOURNAL 



MARCH, 1959 







FEBRUARY 1959 



IF I WERE GOD 

By D. B. Steinmcm 

"If I were Gcxi, this weary world would 

be 
A heaven. My omnipotent decree 
Would banish care and pain, and even 

death!" 
So boast impatient men of little faith. 

How blind these mortals ore, to think 

they can 
Improve upon creation's master plan! 

In star-filled blueprint they see naught 

sublime. 
Nor can they calibrate its scale of time. 
Tears and thorns before the heights are 

won. 
As shadows are long before the rising 

sun. 

To hail the down, we first must know the 

night; 
Only from darkness can we prize the light. 

As spring is wombed beneath the winter's 

snow, 
Who knows not grief knows not 

compassion's glow. 
When summer dies in blaze of autumn 

gold. 
Old leaves must fall before new buds 

unfold. 

Only with dying con there be rebirth 
And laughing children to refresh the 
earth. 



The £yric 



Spring, 1959 



X . TG ; 10. 

. S 8 



TRANSFIGURED CITY 

Leaving the Western plains, we wing our way 

Above the billowed cumulus that shrouds 

The checkerboard below. At dusk of day 

We glimpse our goal and swoop down through the clouds. 

With catch of breath, we suddenly behold 
A web of roadways strung with jeweled light, 
Festoons of rubies, emeralds, and gold, 
Like fabled Baghdad of enchanted night. 

And in the glow the flashing gems impart 
To domes of glass and steel, to tower arid spire, 
One feels the pulsing of a mighty heart: 
This Queen of cities, robed in lambent fire. 

GRAND DAUGHTER 

Her bliss of infancy is gone : 
Where formerly she reigned supreme, 
A newborn brother holds the throne. 
Her earlier sway a shattered dream. 

Now there is question in her eyes, 
A troubled look upon her face. 
What tender years to realize 
The tragedy of second place! 

Quietly she reads her book, 
But on the infant boy keeps musing. 
She casts a furtive, searching look. 
Half self-eflFacing, half accusing. 

What recompense can one bestow 

For such a loss, past all believing? 

The crown no longer on her brow, 

What balm can heal her young heart's grieving? 

D. B. Steinman 



MARCH, 1959 



%, TG 140 
. S 8 



THE CHURCHMAN 



MORAL ARMOR FOR THE ATOMIC AGE 



An Engineer Discusses the Vital Roles 
Of Both Religion and Science for Today 



. S 8 



By D. B. STEHNMAIN 



e 



ON AUGIST 6, 194."), when the re- 
port of an atomic blast over 
Hiroshima was flashed around 
the globe, civilization was shaken to its 
utmost foundations. Individual reac- 
tions varied, from "I am scared to 
death," to "Father, forgive them for 
they know not what they do." Men 
realized that, in one brief moment, the 
history of the world had been changed. 
For better or for worse, the story of 
mankind had entered a new and fateful 
chapter. 

Mortal man stands frightened among 
the appalling forces he has summoned 
from the unknown. Beholding the nu- 
clear conflagration, man feels himself 
a child playing with matches — and he 
grows afraid. 

In the present world crisis, we can 
at least strive to avoid mad actions and 
pray to be delivered from blind acci- 
dents. Through enlightened public 
opinion we can prevent those who gov- 
ern us from lapsing into carelessness. 

Civilized man is feeling the strain. 
There is a weary feeling of having 
almost reached the ultimate in the 
Faustian bargain of man's mastery 
over nature; and of having glimpsed in 
atomic power more of mastery — and of 
death — than man is ready to face. 

Perhaps the fear and the soul-search- 
ing it induces are hopeful signs. Many 
more people now sense the need of 
divine guidance, of a moral compass to 
steer by, if only because they realize 
that a single blundering act may prove 
fatal to our civilization, if not to the 
continuance of the race of man. 

The realization grows upon us that 
the spiritual ideal has ceased to be a 
luxury and has become an absolute 
necessity. Today, in a literal sense 
never before so apparent, the moral law 
has become the law of survival. 

In our struggle for the heart of man, 
we must renew the faith; gain again 
the flaming emotion of Pitt and Crom- 
well; of Washington, Lincoln, and the 
great founders of the Republic; of St. 
Paul and all the great Christian mar- 
tyrs who died for their religious be- 
liefs. We must fire political doctrine 
and spiritual ideals with ardent belief, 
for our own sake and for the decency 
of mankind. 



Daily we pray, "Thy Kingdom come." 
Without a belief in the ultimate good, 
all we have held sacred becomes mean- 
ingless. There is no old world to go 
back to; a new one must be made, and 
there are tigers in the way. We must 
breed and nurture a robust vigor to 
resist the vicious assertion that a state 
is an autocratic entity with supreme 
rights; that it need have no morals or 
obligations, and that its members are 
creatures to do its soulless bidding re- 
gardless of their own instincts of hu- 
man dignity and of kindliness. 

We must cling to honor, to moral 
courage, to humanitarian ideals. There 
is a tendency to think of these things 
in far too small units of time. Many 
are in panic because we have not solved 
the problems of the Atomic Age in 
the brief span of ten years. All his- 
toric time is only a moment in the 
eternal plan. Mankind is barely emerg- 
ing from the nursery. He stands bright- 
eyed with new knowledge of his past 
and, for the first time, with the power 
and will to mold his own future. We 
must educate our youth so that they 
will be strong to resist evil and to fight 
for the things that endure. 

St. Thomas Aquinas once said that 
there are only three really important 
endeavors in life: To have faith in the 
right things, to hope for the right 
things, to love the right things in life. 

RELIGION, art, and science, represent- 
ing the everlasting search for the 
good, the true, and the beautiful con- 
stitute a trinity of human aspiiation. 
All three are but difl'erent aspects of 
the same reality, of the same feeling 
for the sublime, rooted in the supreme 
mystery of being. 

It has been pointed out that there 
is a common and unifying element — 
what we identify instinctively as the 
divine spark — in a Raphael Madonna, 
a Beethoven symphony, a discovery by 
Copernicus, Newton, or Einstein. In 
each instance, inspiration was drawn 
from some common resorvoir of spirit- 

Tlie aiillior has an inlcmatioiial repula- 
tion as a bruise ensineer and lonsull- 
anl and is the author of many hooks in 
his speciiihzed fiehl. 



ual vitality. In each there were moments 
of flashing intuition that call to mind 
the burning bush that spoke unto Moses. 
The experience of sudden inner illumi- 
nation beyond mere intelligence, the 
inner light known to mystics, martyrs, 
and poets, is not unknown to creative 
scientists and inventors. 

Art and religion flow from the same 
fount of inspiration in the human soul. 
We need only to think of the Psalms 
and the Prophets, or supreme examples 
of religious music and painting, to see 
their intimate relationship. And fore- 
most thinkers among scientists and 
theologians are coming to recognize 
that science and religion also are close- 
ly related. As the horizons of science 
advance, many of its great leaders be- 
come more humble, not less; more rever- 
ent, not less. 



THE more deeply we delve into the 
heart of nature, the more awe- 
struck we stand in the face of ineluc- 
table mysteries. As the frontier of 
science advance, the scientist, the poet, 
and the religious man meet on common 
ground — the common ground of the 
ultimate, the infinite, the eternal. 

The man who discovered that elec- 
tricity and magnetism are related, Hans 
Christian Oersted, once said, "The uni- 
verse is a manifestation of an infinite 
leason and the laws of nature are the 
thoughts of God." 

From Pythagoras and Euclid to New- 
ton and Einstein, the mathematicians 
and scientists voyage on enchanted seas 
to find new isles of wonder. In the 
microcosm of the atom and in the uni- 
versal laws of celestial mechanics, they 
find the poetry of harmony and perfec- 
tion. They unveil for man the simple 
and sublime unity of Creation. In the 
stiucture of the universe, they discover 
the divinest poetry — the grandeur of 
the infinite. 

By godlike magic given to man, link; 
ing the infinitesimal to the infinite, the 
scientist penetrates the atom and he 
las.sos the flying stars. And in the or- 
dered beauty and unity of the cosmos, 
in its sublime and oteinal design, he 
finds divinity. 

The age-old conflict between science 



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Bridge to Link Canada and Unrtld States 




• FOR NEARLY 25 years a bridge con- 
necting the United States and Canada at 
Sault Ste. Marie has been discussed. The 
International Bridge Authority was origi- 
nally created by the Michigan legislature 
in 1935 to build a toll bridge. In 1941 a 
consulting engineering firm, hired to 
study costs of the project, recommended 
construction on a line 3 miles east of the 
city of Sault Ste. Marie. 

Necessary federal legislation authoriz- 
ing the authority to make a connection be- 
tween the two countries was passed by the 
U. S. congress in 1940. In 1954 the Michi- 
gan legislature revised the original act 
creating the authority to better enable it to 
expedite financing of the bridge. In 1955 
the Canadian parliament created the St^ 
Mary's River Bridge Co. to provide a ve 
hicular crossing of the St. Mary's River 
and later the rights and powers of the com 
pany were assigned to the International 
Bridge Authority, in an eflort to better ex- 
pedite financing and construction of the 
bridge. In 1956, engineering consultants 
conducted a traffic and revenue study of 
the bridge. 

In the spring of 1958 John C. Mackie, 
Michigan state highway commissioner, 
met with the then Ontario Minister of 
Highways James N. Allan (he is now min- 
ister of the treasury) and both agreed their 
respective agencies should make every ef- 
fort to assist in financing and constructing 
the project. The two highway departments 
requested D. B. Steinman. designer of the 
Mackinac Bridge, to report on design anti 
engineering recommendations. 

The bridges and approaches would be 
12,000 ft. long, exclusive of toll plazas, 
providing two 14-ft. traffic lanes plus 2-ft. 
emergency walkways on both sides. 

It would include an American plaza, 
about 1 mile west of the present ferry 
dock, located adjacent to Pine St. between 

BETTER ROADS • February, 1959 



An artist's drawing of the proposed $18,000,000 bridge across the St. Mary's River 
between the United States and Canada at Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. Below, the span across the 
American ship canal in detail. A similar structure will span the Canadian ship canal. According 
to preliminary estimates the structure as designed would take 18 months to build. Design 
standards are similar to those of the Bureau of Public Roads for U. S. interstate roads 




EaitcrJay and Ravine iUcets, oV, :i;guig 
north from the plaza in a gentle "S" curve 
to the river spans for 4,145 ft. The river 
spans include two main structures across 
the .American and Canadian ship canals 
and lesser spans over the United States 
power canal and the St. Mary's River rap- 
ids for a total length of 4,810 ft. The Cana- 
dian approach would be 3,045 ft. long, ex- 
tending north and east from the Canadian 
ship canal in a gentle curve to the Canatli- 
an plaza located between Queen St. west 
and .'\lbert St., extending from Huilson 
St. to Huron St., a distance of 660 ft. 

The crossing will be located just east of 
the existing railroad bridge across the 
river. 

The United States section would in- 
clude two main spans, each 430 ft. long, 
with end spans 200 ft. long. There would 
be three spans on the Canadian side, one 



;i..uii ...pan iJu tt. long (over the Canadian 
ship canal, allowing for its future expan- 
sion), plus two end spans 200 ft. long. 
Lesser spans would cross the power canal 
.ind the St. Mary's River rapids. 

The design standards are similar to 
those recruited by the U. S. Bureau of Pub- 
lic Roads for bridges of this magnitude on 
the national interstate system, of which 
the bridge will be a part, with special at- 
tention given to provision of resistance to 
ice pressures on piers. 

The bridge will include 67 piers and 
will effect a crossing through shallow wa- 
ter of a maximum depth of 20 ft., gener- 
ally founded in sandstone rock. The cost 
of the bridge is estimated at $18,198,000, 
including $1,302,000 for right-of-way. 

Operation and maintenance of the struc- 
ture is estimated to cost $325,000. It would 
take 18 months to build the bridge. ■ 




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of Chi Epsilon 



National Civil Engineering Honor Fraternity 

Spring-Fall 1959 




Y 



U.S. Engineers To Make History: 
Bosporus Bridge Planned 




Sometime between now and Jan- 
uary, 1960, the Turkish Govern- 
ment will announce the opening 
of construction bids lor a $50,000,- 
000 suspension bridge across the 
Bosporus at Istanbul. , 

In so doing, it will translate a 
century-<3ld dream into a concrete 
reality— the linking oi the two con- 
tinents ol Europe and Asia. This 
will be the world's first intercon- 
tinental bridge and the longest 
bridge in the Eastern Hemisphere. 

D. B. STEINMAN IS DESIGNER 

Designer oi the bridge is the 
well-known American engineer, D. 
B. Steinman, creator ot such fa- 
mous bridges as the recently com- 
pleted Mackinac Straits Bridge in 
Michigan (longest in the world), 
New York's Henry Hudson Bridge, 
and the Thousand Islands Bridge 
across the St. Lawrence River. 

DESIGN FEATURES 

The suspension bridge will have 
a main span ot .H091 leet and two 
side spans ^oi 681 ieet each. Two 
archetl main towers, 520 feet each, 
will be supported on piers sunk 
to rock about 100 leet below water. 

A .system of wires and cable stays 
will radiate upwards from the ends 
ot the trusses at each tower. 
Planned to provide maximum re- 
sistance to earthquakes, ihcy will 
be arranged so as to emphasi/.e 
and conlorm with the gracefiU 
curves ot the main cable. 

SPONSORED AND FINANCED 
■Y THE TURKISH GOVERNMENT 

Planning, financing and build- 
ing ot the Rosnorus Bridge is un- 
der the supervision ot Turki.sh 
(ienerai Directorate ot Highways, 
;nul is considered to be one ot the 
major projects in the (tirrent Na- 
tional Highways construction and 
moderni/ation program. When 
completed, it will jjrovide the con- 
necting link for the modern high- 
ways now under construction 
which cross the country East from 
.\nkara and other points to liie 
(ireek border. 

SETTING CALLED "UNIQUELY 
BEAUTIFUL" BY ENGINEERS 

.\skeil to conmicnt on any un- 
unusual aspects of this latest Stein- 





Arrhitect's rendering oj the proposed Bosporus Bridge. 



man briilge, a firm s])okesman said; 
"its uni(]ue location, both histori- 
(ally and aesthetically." 

,\ny one familiar with the his- 
tory anil geography ot Turkey 
woiiltl agree. The Bosporus, a 
strait which coniieds the Hhuk 
•Sea with the Sea ot Marmara and 
separates Turkey from itself as 
well as Europe from Asia, has at- 
ways l)een ot strategic importance, 
(oveted i)y both conipieror and 
\\()idd-he toniiuerer of I lukey. 

It is a favorite toiiiist attraction 
with its Kxk tenain and wooded 
sliores, where palaces, villas and 
gardens extend to the water's edge. 
Rarely Iro/en over, the Bos|)onis 



despite its undertow, is a fre(|ueut 
bathing spot. 

READY FOR USE IN 1963 

Now travelled only by ferries 
and boats, the Bosporus will soon 
ser\ice automobiles and trucks, all 
the appurtenances ol modern trans- 
])ortation. In addition, .i vertical 
iinderdearance of 164 leet for the 
central jjortion of the main s|):im 
will i)e provided for international 
shipping. 

Atcording to Steinman, wlio will 
also supervise the (onstruciion of 
the bridge, it should be reatly lor 
use sometime in 196,*!. 



TRIANGLE 
REVIEW 



v^5 



November, 1959 



44th Convention Names S. C. Hollister 
To National Honorary Membership 

Engineering educator Solomon Cady 
Hollister Cornell honorary, former 
Dean of the College of Engineering and 
Trustee of Cornell University, was ele- 
vated to National Honorary Member 
status at the concluding banquet session 
of the 44th annual convention, 'Septem- 
ber 2-5. 

The sixth man to receive this status 
— which is jealously guarded by Tri- 
angle and reserved for men of such 
outstanding eminence in the engineer- 
ing profession as to merit national, if 
not international acclamation. Brother 
Hollister joins David Barnard Stein- 
man, master mind behind the five-mile- 



long Mackinac Bridge; Lt. General 
John R. Hodge, retired, former Chief 
of Army Field Forces and former mili- 
tary governor of Korea. Deceased Na- 
tional Honorary Members include: Dr. 
Ovid Wallace Eshbach, former Dean 
of Northwestern University Technologi- 
cal Institute; Daniel W. Mead, famed 
authority on hydraulics and Professor 
Emeritus Hydraulic and Sanitary En- 
gineering, University of Wisconsin; and 
Arthur N. Talbot, famed authority on 
concrete and railroads, and Professor 
Emeritus in Municipal and Sanitary 
Engineering, University of Illinois. 
Brother Hollister has been an hon- 



"An Honor I Will Always 
Cherish ..." 
—Brother Hollister 

In accepting National Honorary Mem- 
bership, Dean Hollister said he knows 
the other living recipients — General 
Hodges and Dr. Steinman. "These are 
great men." he said, "to rank me with 
them is an honor I will always cherish." 



orary member of Cornell Chapter since 
the Chapter's initiation into the na- 
tional organization in 1942. 

Only a few of his accomplishments 
follow: Membership on numerous pro- 
fessional and public commissions in- 
cludes the Manpower Commission of 
Engineers' Joint Council; the Commit- 
tee on Specialized Personnel, Office of 
Defense Mobilization; Advisory Com- 
mittee on Engineering Sciences for 
Selective Service; the Advisory Com- 
mittee for the National Registry of 
Engineers and Scientists; and the Sig- 
nal Corps Development and Research 
Council. 

He is currently chairman of the Com- 
mittee on the Survey of the Profession 
of Engineers' Joint Council — Engineers' 
Council for Professional Development. 
His association with various state and 
federal agencies extends over a period 
of many years, the most recent being 
his service on the Second Hoover Com- 
mission, and the current chairmanship 
of the Board of Consultants for Isth- 
mian Canal Studies for the Committee 
of Merchant Marine and Fisheries of 
the House of Representatives. He has 
recently been appointed to the Steering 
Committee for the Study of Africa 
South of the Sahara. 

Brother Hollister has accepted nu- 
merous assignments in the field of educa- 
tion, including service as chairman of 
the Education Committee of Engineers' 
Council for Professional Development, 
and on the ECFD Committees on Grad- 
uate Education and Adequacy and 
Standards. His long participation in 
the activities of the American Society 
for Engineering Education culminated 
in his being elected president in 1951-52. 
In 1952 he was awarded the Lamme 
Medal, bestowed annually upon a dis- 
tingruished engineering educator. He 
holds honorary degrees from several 
universities. 






Three 
Dimensions 

of 

Man 



^ 



DAVID BARNARD STEINMAN 

Doctor of Fine Arts ^ 

Bethany College _Ji 

1960 J^ 9^ 

-^ {J) 






Sheathed in Ice, Bridge Can Stand Winds of 632 mph 

Mackinac Suspension Span 
'Most Stable Ever Designed 



BT GREOO SMITH. 

(CIHien Fktrlot Special Corrapondeot.) 

St Ignace — Wind tunnel tests 
have disclosed that the Mackinac 
;5traits bridge being constructed 
nere will be the world's most aero- 
dynamically stable bridge when it 
Is completed. 

The tests, conducted by Prof. F. 
B. Farquharson . of the suspension 
bridge laboratory at the University 
of Washington, have disclosed that 
the bridge, under the most ad- 
verse circumstances (sheathed in 
sleet) will remain stable in wind 
speeds up to 632 miles per hour. 

The figure should be a source of 
comfort to doubters of the bridge's 
stability. The highest wind ever re- 
corded at the straits is 78 miles 
per hour. 

Wind tunnel tests of the bridge, 
the world's longest single suspen^ 
slon span, were arranged for by Dr. 
D. B. Steimnan, consulting engi- 
neer and designer of the bridge, 
March 18, 1954. And after exhaus- 
tive tests, the final report was 
made by Prot Farquharson May 
20, 1955. 

OFEIGIAL BEPOBT. 

In an official report to the Mack- 
inac bridge authority, after a re- 
view of the wind tunnel tests, Dr, 
Steinman stated, "Extensive wind 
tunnel tests show, as anticipated, 
that the Mackinac bridge, as de- 
signed, has complete and absolute 
aerodynamic oscillation (vertical, 
torsional, and coupled) at all wind 
velocities and all angles of at- 
tack." 

In less scientific terminology. 
Dr. Steinman meiuis that tiie 
bridge will not start a "Gallop- 
ing Gertie" act aa occiirred 
when the Tacoma narrows 
bridge collapsed. 
Dr. Steinman added, "Even for 
the hypothetical and abnormal con- 
dition were all openings in the 
deck are assumed to be completely 
closed by ice, the Mackinac bridge 
has complete and absolute aero- 



ot exhaustive aerodynamie 
tests for the proposed Severn 
bridge in England and 68 per 
cent greater than the ratio 
used in the Golden Gate 
bridge. 

According to Dr. Steinman, this 
generously high depth'to-span ra- 
tio — will have more ample aero- 
dynamic stability. By scientific de- 
sign, utilizing all the new knowl- 
edge of suspension bridge aerody- 
namics, the Mackinac bridge has 
been made the most stable sus- 
pension bridge, aerodynomicaliy, 
that has ever been designed, the 
designer claims. 

DESIGN SAVES CASH. 

Dr. Steinman adds, "This result 
has been achieved, not by spend- 
ing millions of dollars to build up 
the structure in weight and stiff- 
ness to resist the effects, but by 
scientific design of the cross-sec- 
tion to eliminate the causes of in- 
stability." 

And that's what Prof. Farquhar- 
son found out, too. Because models 
of the bridge had features of sta- 
bility much higher than had ever 
been previously Investigated, the 
wind tunnel test equipment used 
at the experiment station had to be 
revised, extensively. Some features 
of stability were too high to be ful- 
ly duplicated in the model test and 
so the next improvement in the 
science of bridge will probably not 
be in bridges — but in wind tunnels 
to test them. 



dynamic stability against all modes 
of oscillation at all wind velocities 
up to a wind velocity of 632 miles 
per hour for the lowest mode of 
oscillations and 942 miles per hour 
for the next higher mode." 

For comparative purposes, offi- 
cial bulletins of the University of 
Washington engineering experi- 
ment station list the critical wind 
velocities or other famous Ameri- 
can bridges as follows: Bronx- 
Whitestone (after addition of stif- 
fening trusses) 30 mph. Golden 
Gate, 40 mph,; (George Washington, 
55 mph; New Tacoma narrows, 76 
mph.; Mackinac (with deck closed) 
632 mph.; Mackinac (with deck 
open as designed) infinite. 

DEVELOP THEOBT. 

For many years the designer of 
the Mackinac bridge had noted 
that suspension bridges had a ten- 
diency to sway and develop an un- 
dulating motion, in winds of gale 
force. Pondering the probable cause 
of this phenomena. Dr. Steinman 
developed the theory that a span of 
a bridge was no different than the 
wing of an aeroplane. The greater 
the wind, the more vacuum was 
developed above its surface just 
like the vacuiun that lifts a plane 
into the air when wind rushes over 
the surface of a wing. 

To avert this effect, the designer 
reasoned that a teidge, to with' 
stand winds, should be as open as 
possible so that winds could not 
create a lifting surface. To provide 
stiffening effect to the bridge, the 
ratio of the trusses supporting the 
span should be as deep a ratio to 
length as could be economically 
constructed. 

Combining these requirements. 
Dr. Steinman developed a new con- 
cept in big bridge design which he 
termed the "aerodynamic stability 
of bridges." 

Stiffening tnisses on the 
Maddnae bridge will be S« feet rr— _ 

in depth, or one one hundredth JaCKSOn Citizen- Patriot 

:l^'^'U:S^^ri^^ Michigan (Aug. 14,1955) 



\-TG MO 
.S3 




472' , 1 , IBQO' 






iVJiK-vni^mf 




472' 



6344' 



MACKINAC BRIDGE 
COMPLETED 1997 




VERRAZANO -NARROWS BRIDGE (UNDER CONSTRUCTION) 
FOR COMPLETION IN 1964 




GOLDEN GATE BRIDGE 
COMPLETED I9ST 




GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE 
COMPLETED 1931 




BROOKLYN BRIDGE 
COMPLETED 1883 



THE WORLD'S GREAT SUSPENSION BRIDGES 
COMPARATIVE MAGNITUDE 



.39 



WITH BEAUTY LIKE A PSALM 
(For Dr. David B, Steinman) 

The needs of mankind are his deep concern: 

Rivers to span — broad lakes and swamps traverse; 
All intricate dimensions he must learn 

And deftly pattern, like a lyric verse; 
His eager mind encompasses the world 

Whose need is fellowship and human grace, 
Hence, by his hand, deftly are hurled 

Inviting spans that lead from place to place. 
He holds so many lives within his palm, 

Yet skill and conscience make him oversure 
That he can build with beauty like a psalm 

Imbuing strength that always will endure; 
And though his feet cling firmly to the sod 

His hand and spirit seem a part of God. 

Jean Chalmers Donaldson 



THE POETRY SOCIETY OF AMERICA 
ANTHOLOGY (1910-1960) 







(joldcYi Xjcar 

D, B. Steinman 

BLUEPRINT 

He saw it clearly and clairvoyant bright: 
Twin granite pylons of majestic rise, 
Founded on rock beneath the water swirl; 

The loft>- cables, spun of cold-drawn steel. 

Cutting the sky in parabolic ores— 

A lyric pattern etched against the blue. 

The spcW of Euclid sang in his design: 

The wizardr)' of radiating sta\s, 

A geometric web to hold the stars; 

Tlie titan uplift of tlie singing strands; 

High Gothic portals framed in stone— all these 

He traced in blueprint, accurate as truth. 

This magic he had made, though in the end 

He did not live to see the caissons down. 

The shadow of a fear that builders know 

Was myth made real: '\ bridge demands a life.* 

He paid the toll, the world his legatee: 

His work, his dream, bridging the span of death. 



i\ 



-• s 




A- ' (3/40 
.Se 



ENGINEERING 



Capacity of Golden Gate 
Bridge to Be Studied 

A four-month study to determine the 
feasibility of running high-speed rapid 
transit vehicles across the Golden Gate 
Bridge will be conducted by D. B. Stein- 
man, F. ASCE, New York City consult- 
ing engineer and bridge authority. A 
rapid transit route between San Fran- 
cisco and Marin County is a key link in 
the five-county, 125-mile rapid transit 
system that has been proposed for the 
Bay area. 



April 1960 



STATE JOURNAL 



XL 



LANSING— EAST LANSING, MK^GAN , FEBRUARY 21, 1960 




The Bridge at Mackinac 



X- iG/^o 



When it opened Nov, 1, 1957, 
Michigan's breath-takinfr Mackin- 
ac bridge was hailed by Gov. G. 
Mennen Williams as "a modern 
Northwest Passage." 

Indeed, the giant bridge has 
stimulated a greater flow of long- 
distance travel through Michigan 
to the Rocky Mountain and Paci- 
fic states and to the Canadian 
provinces. 

But in far greater measure it 
has opened new avenues of com- 
merce and tourtst travel between 
upper and lower Michigan and be- 
tween Michigan and its immediate 
neighbors in the north central re- 
gion. 

FOUR YEARS in the building 
and costing almost $100 million, 
the Mackinac bridge (pronounced 
Mack-in-aw) emerged in 1957 as 
one of the greatest of the man- 
made wonders of the world . . . 
an artistically impressive million- 
ton combination of steel and con- 
crete linking the upper and lower 
peninsulas of Michigan. 

Measured between its enormous 
cable anchorage blocks — each of 
them about a third of a football 
field in size — it is the world's 
longest suspension span — 8,614 
feet. 

Including Its approaches, it is 
five miles long — 26,372 feet to be 
exact . . . and cuts what was 
once a minimum crossing time of 
one hour on the ferries betweer 
Mackinaw City and St. Ignace to 
10 minutes. 

During its first 12 months of op- 
eration, the four-lane structure 
carried 1,411,500 vehicles — 54 per 
cent more traffic than the ferries 
transported across the Straits of 
Mackinac the year before. 

ITS ERECTION fulfilled a cen- 
tuiy • old dream of northern Mich- 
igan travelers for a bridge across 
the turbulent straits. 




The Mackinac bridge is Michi- 
gan's only domestic highway toll 
route. Its operators — the Mack- 
inac Bridge Authority, created by 
the 1950 legislature — believe it 
will attract enough traffic to re- 
pay its $99.fi00,000 revenue bond is- 
sue in 25 to 30 years — after which 
toV charges will either be elimin- 
ated or sharply reduced to cover 
.only the cost of maintenance. 

In the first eight months of 1959, 
the bridge drew 30 per cent more 
trucks and other commercial ve- 
hicles than in the same period 
the year before — indicative of 
the stimulating effect the span is 
having on the state's commercial 
development. 

The story of the Mackinac 
bridge is told only in the superla- 
tives matching the relentless dte- 
termination of generations o f 
Michigan people to unite their two 
great peninsulas no matter what 
the financial cost nor the engineer- 
ing difficulty. 

Its ivory - colored suspension 
towers — standing 552 feet above 
water, higher than the Penobscot 
building in Detroit, Michigan's 
tallest skyscraper . . . are 3,800 
feet apart, astride a gorge in the 
straits 295 feet deep. 

While the central span between 
the towers is slightly shorter than 
that of the Golden Gate bridge, 
Mackinac's 8,614 feet between the 
massive concrete cable anchor- 
ages make it the world's longest 
suspension bridge. 



From their rock foundations to 
their tip, the cable towers are 762 
feet high — and each contains 
6,500 tons of steel. Above water 
thby'rise as high as a 46-story of- 
fice building — and almost as 
high as the 555-foot Washington 
Monument. 

Leading to the suspension span 
itself are 28 truss spans, ranging 
in length from 160 to 560 feet — 
makin? a total expanse of 19,243 
ieet (more than Pi miles) of steel 
superstructure. 



THE BRIDGE arches gracefully 
over the straits, allowing 155 feet 
of clearance at midspan for the 
largest ships to pass safely be- 
neath. At that point, the roadway 
of the span is 199 feet above wa- 
ter. 

The two suspension cables — 68 
feet apart — are more than two 
feet in diameter (24% inches), 
fabricated of 42,000 miles of wire. 
. . . enough to reach one and two- 
thirds times around the equator. 
The cables weigh 11,840 tons. 

Weight of the superstructure is 
66,500 tons . . . and of the founda- 
tions and superstructure together, 
1,024.500 tons. 

The concrete blocks in which 
the suspension cables are anchor- 
ed are each 135 feet long and 
capable of resisting 30,000 tons of 
pull from the two cables which 
support the main span. 

Each of the anchorage blocks 
contains more than 85,000 cubic 
yards of concrete — enough to 
build 26 miles of two-lane pave- 
ment. More than 466,300 cubic 
yards of concrete went into the 
entire structure, for a total of 
934.000 tons of concrete. 

The four-lane bridge has a 48- 
foot-wide roadway, with opposing 
traffic separated by a raised cen« 



ter mall two feet wide. At the pt 
mitted speed of 45 miles an hou 
it is capable el handling 3,0 
cars an hour — and if used 
capacity could accommodate I 
one week the volume of trafl 
carried during an entire year i 
the ferry fleet which the bridj 
replaced. 

The bridge is designed to wit 
stand wind velocity of 632 mil 
an hour — far more than h 
ever been recorded at Mackina 
. . . and is engineered to resi 
ice pressures greatly in excess 
anything known or considered p< 
sible at the straits. Some 85.0 
blueprints and 4,000 engineerii 
drawings were used in its cc 
struction^ guiding the work of t 
10,350 men employed on the pn 
ect at the bridge site and In t 
quarries, shops, mills and oth 
supply points. 

THE JO-MINUTE bridge Cfo 
ing brings Michigan's two pen 
sulas «bout 150 miles closer 
gether In driving time — for, wh 
ferries were in use, it was custo 
ary to have to wait a, consideral 
time for a crossing. At times di 
ing the deer hunting season, tr 
fie waiting to board the ferr; 
was lined up for 17 miles. 

Despite the immensity of t 
job, constniction proceeded ( 
schedule during the four-ye 
building p^iod, and the brid 
was opened to traffic Nov. 1, 191 
the date announced before 1 1 
project started. It was formal 
dedicated In elaborate ceremoni 
June 25 - 28. 1858. 

Its designer and chief engine 
Dr. David B. Steinman. says 
Mackinac bridge should rem 
serviceable for at least a centu 

In 1959 the American Institute 
Steel Construction designated t 
structure as "America's m o 
beautiful bridge." 







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Newsletter to PARENTS 



ST. LAWRFNCH UNIVHRSITY 



April 1960 



STEINMAN FESTIVAL AWARDS 



C 



Student achievement in tlie creative arts was 
cited during the third annual David B. Steinman 
Festival of Arts, March 8-16. 

Awards were made to the following students: 
The David B. Steinman Prize in Creative Arts 
— Joyce Muller, Westfield, N. J.; Frederic Rem- 
ington Prize in Fine Arts — Vagn Worm de Gel- 
dern, New York City; David B. Steinman Festival 
Purchase Prize in Art — Peter Dygert, Rochester; 
Paul L. Wolf Memorial Prize in English — joint 
award to Bruce and Robin McNallie, Buffalo; 
Alexander Black Memorial Award for Contri- 
butions to College Journalism — John Simpkinson, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and Celiene Nold, Rome; and 
the Hill News Editorial Board Award — Carol 
Kemp, Dravosburg, Pa. 




glGNPO^ n 



April 1960 



X'- /(JM" 

Ss 



CHILD IN A CARPENTER SHOP 
by David B. Steinman 

Learning t h e tools 
Of his father's trade, 
He nailed one lath across another 
Then silently brought it to his mother. 
With trembling sense 
Of future loss, 
She saw the sign 
The child had made. 
It was a cross. 



This poem, which tells a faiitiliar Easter story in siviple, poignant terms, is the 
work of Dr. David B. Stetmiian, one of the foremost builders of bridges in the world 
today. He recently completed the great bridge across the Mackinack Strait and is now 
at work on the Indus River Bridge in Pakistan. When completed in 1961, this will be 
the longest railroad arch span in Asia and the third longest in the world. 

Dr. Steinman sees bridges not only as structures of iron and steel to enable pedes- 
trians, motorists and railroads to cross rivers and bays, but also as monuments of beauty 
and romance, hi his desire to express what he really feels about his bridges, he turned to 
poetry. So successful has he been that he has won many prizes. This particular poem won 
first prize from the Wisconsin Poetry Magazine and is reprinted with Dr. Steinman's 
permission.